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February 12, 2014
15:44 // 5 months ago
December 11, 2013

Revenge porn brings federal charges for California resident

  • 10K+ explicit images were published by a revenge porn site, allegedly created by California resident Kevin Christopher Bollaert, during its roughly nine months in operation. Authorities say the site admin also ran a separate side-business, which the alleged site admin used to contact victims and offer to get their explicit photos removed…for a $300-$350 fee.
  • 31 felony charges have been leveled against Kevin Christopher Bollaert, who was arrested on Tuesday, including conspiracy, identity theft and extortion charges, The filing also alleges that Bollaert broke existing federal statues, rather than California’s recently passed anti-revenge porn legislation. source
15:13 // 7 months ago
August 8, 2013
14:58 // 11 months ago
May 11, 2013
On November 7th, his administration gleefully voted at the UN for a renewed effort to pass the ‘Small Arms Treaty.’ But after the tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut — and anti-gun hysteria in the national media reaching a fever pitch — there’s no doubt President Obama and his anti-gun pals believe the timing has never been better to ram through the U.N.’s global gun control crown jewel. I don’t know about you, but watching anti-American globalists plot against our Constitution makes me sick.
An email from Senator Rand Paul, on behalf of the National Association on Gun Rights • Decrying the Obama administration’s shadowy collaboration with the United Nations, aimed at a constitutional end-around abolishing the Second Amendment via international arms treaty. If you haven’t heard about this, that may be because it’s actually a well-worn and fallacious conspiracy theory, but that didn’t stop Paul from lending his name to this paranoia-fueled fundraising effort from the National Association on Gun Rights. It’s a theory cut from virtually the same intellectual cloth as those UN-centric “Agenda 21” conspiracy theories, propagated by people like Alex Jones — who, as it happens, has landed the Kentucky Senator as an interview guest in the past. This is a major issue facing Paul, should he indulge bigger, national political ambitions — he’s proven extremely willing to court the affections (and in the process endorse the ideas) of people far out on the conspiratorial right-wing. source
16:24 // 1 year ago
November 2, 2012
dailydot:

Unraveling Markovian Parallax Denigrate, the Internet’s oldest and weirdest mystery 
Spam. It’s the Internet’s most resilient parasite. Millions of messages pollute the Web’s pipes every day. Grow a monster penis. Lose 20 pounds. Help out an African prince. You know the drill.
A lot of it is garbled junk, sentences that read like a computer ingested the Oxford English Dictionary and vomited it back out. The results are bizarre and often unintentionally hilarious, a favorite subject of forwarded emails or, in the age of Twitter, cult celebrity. Spam account @horse_ebooks boasts 120,000 thousand followers thanks entirely to the accidental and absurdist poetry of its tweets.
But back in 1996, users of the proto-Web community Usenet got spammed with messages that reached an almost transcendent level of bizarre—a weirdness so precise it implied the influence of a very human intelligence. [more]

I read this piece all the way through, and it really reminded me of this magazine that no longer exists, but was a cover-to-cover read for me in the late ’90s: Internet Underground Magazine. It had some awesome design for the era, covered edgy topics, and even inspired some notable early memes. It was a great magazine because it seemed much more invested in the culture of the internet than its much-more-heralded competitor, Wired, did. But it closed in 1997, the victim of low ad sales and a change in ownership. It’s too bad. Like Suck.com, they missed out on the good part.
It just hit me that The Daily Dot is the modern equivalent of this magazine, which just made my respect for them go way up.

dailydot:

Unraveling Markovian Parallax Denigrate, the Internet’s oldest and weirdest mystery

Spam. It’s the Internet’s most resilient parasite. Millions of messages pollute the Web’s pipes every day. Grow a monster penis. Lose 20 pounds. Help out an African prince. You know the drill.

A lot of it is garbled junk, sentences that read like a computer ingested the Oxford English Dictionary and vomited it back out. The results are bizarre and often unintentionally hilarious, a favorite subject of forwarded emails or, in the age of Twitter, cult celebrity. Spam account @horse_ebooks boasts 120,000 thousand followers thanks entirely to the accidental and absurdist poetry of its tweets.

But back in 1996, users of the proto-Web community Usenet got spammed with messages that reached an almost transcendent level of bizarre—a weirdness so precise it implied the influence of a very human intelligence. [more]

I read this piece all the way through, and it really reminded me of this magazine that no longer exists, but was a cover-to-cover read for me in the late ’90s: Internet Underground Magazine. It had some awesome design for the era, covered edgy topics, and even inspired some notable early memes. It was a great magazine because it seemed much more invested in the culture of the internet than its much-more-heralded competitor, Wired, did. But it closed in 1997, the victim of low ad sales and a change in ownership. It’s too bad. Like Suck.com, they missed out on the good part.

It just hit me that The Daily Dot is the modern equivalent of this magazine, which just made my respect for them go way up.

19:05 // 1 year ago
February 1, 2011

Colleen LaRose pleads guilty to terrorism conspiracy

  • YES Colleen LaRose conspired with terrorist groups source

» Jihad Jane fesses up: The 47-year-old Michigan woman widely known as “Jihad Jane” plead guilty today.  She was charged with contacting an Islamic terrorist group and pledging to aid them in murdering Danish cartoonist Lars Vilks, who suffered attempts on his life after penning a newspaper comic featuring the Islamic prophet, Muhammad.

15:48 // 3 years ago
January 10, 2011

On conspiracy theories and stuff like that

j-boner asks: What is the most interesting conspiracy to you?

» We say: Not really into believing conspiracies over here, but we do find the roots of them to be interesting. What makes people to dig into things like Roswell, JFK, the Moon landing or 9/11 and assume that there’s a secondary explanation for what happened? Is it general mistrust of government? Or is it something else? (It’s our Office Hours! Ask us a question or something!)

21:39 // 3 years ago