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July 6, 2014
21:23 // 1 month ago
May 20, 2014

Pat Sajak writes crazy tweet. Science blogger posts perfect response. The end.

18:46 // 3 months ago
March 31, 2014
20:23 // 4 months ago
February 23, 2014
This is what the East Coast of the United States could look like in a few hundred years, according to a graphic artist who put together a map of the world after 260 feet of sea rise. Go see what your region of the world would look like - Another writer and artist put together images of what your city would look like if it were drowned. 

This is what the East Coast of the United States could look like in a few hundred years, according to a graphic artist who put together a map of the world after 260 feet of sea rise. Go see what your region of the world would look like - Another writer and artist put together images of what your city would look like if it were drowned. 

13:31 // 5 months ago
November 11, 2013
climateadaptation:

What’s the connection between Super Typhoon Haiyan and climate change? Despite the conflicting headlines connecting climate change to massive storms, the science really is unclear. And this is a problem that science writers need to be clear about.  Tom Yulsman of Discover Magazine rounds up some very controversial and frankly terribly dishonest headlines about climate change and typhoons. Check it out if you have a chance.

Very, very interesting. "There are, in fact, conflicting reports about Haiyan’s strength at landfall. Remote sensing by satellites indicated peak wind speeds of 190 to 195 miles per hour, prompting Jeff Masters, director of Meteorology at Weather Underground, to say it was the ‘strongest tropical cyclone on record to make landfall in world history.’ Meanwhile, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration pegged the storm’s peak gusts at 171 miles per hour."

climateadaptation:

What’s the connection between Super Typhoon Haiyan and climate change? Despite the conflicting headlines connecting climate change to massive storms, the science really is unclear. And this is a problem that science writers need to be clear about.  Tom Yulsman of Discover Magazine rounds up some very controversial and frankly terribly dishonest headlines about climate change and typhoons. Check it out if you have a chance.

Very, very interesting. "There are, in fact, conflicting reports about Haiyan’s strength at landfall. Remote sensing by satellites indicated peak wind speeds of 190 to 195 miles per hour, prompting Jeff Masters, director of Meteorology at Weather Underground, to say it was the ‘strongest tropical cyclone on record to make landfall in world history.’ Meanwhile, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration pegged the storm’s peak gusts at 171 miles per hour."

13:30 // 9 months ago
November 3, 2013
14:25 // 9 months ago
September 30, 2013
12:00 // 10 months ago
September 27, 2013
nbcnews:

'Extremely likely': Humans blamed more clearly than ever for global warming
(Photo: Reuters file)
A group of top climate scientists found in a new report that human beings needs to limit all man-made carbon emissions below a total of 1 trillion tons in order to limit climate change – and noted that the planet had already reached half that amount by 2011.
Continue reading

This oughta raise the temperature in the room a few degrees. No, I’m not talking about the situation itself—I’m referring to the discourse.

nbcnews:

'Extremely likely': Humans blamed more clearly than ever for global warming

(Photo: Reuters file)

A group of top climate scientists found in a new report that human beings needs to limit all man-made carbon emissions below a total of 1 trillion tons in order to limit climate change – and noted that the planet had already reached half that amount by 2011.

Continue reading

This oughta raise the temperature in the room a few degrees. No, I’m not talking about the situation itself—I’m referring to the discourse.

12:22 // 10 months ago
July 27, 2013
Republicans have said that this would be a big jobs generator. There is no evidence that that’s true. The most realistic estimates are this might create maybe 2,000 jobs during the construction of the pipeline, which might take a year or two, and then after that we’re talking about somewhere between 50 and 100 jobs in an economy of 150 million working people.
President Obama, in an interview with The New York Times • Dismissing the argument, by proponents of the Keystone XL oil sands pipeline project, that the construction of such would generate a meaningful number of American jobs. This is just one of the arguments against the pipeline that Obama seemed to voice sympathy for in his comments with the paper — he also argued the pipeline would not impact American gasoline prices, as oil shipped to the gulf coast would largely be exported to foreign markets. source
20:03 // 1 year ago
July 5, 2013

America underwater: Artist Nickolay Lamm has created a series of striking images depicting what coastal cities in America will look like over the next several centuries if ocean levels continue to rise at their current rates (between 1992 and 2012, that’d be roughly one inch per decade). The images above are of San Francisco’s AT&T Park and Boston Harbor in 300 years, at which point they’ll be immersed in 25 feet of water.  (Images credit: Nickolay Lamm; higher resolution images posted at Business Insidersource

13:26 // 1 year ago