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February 5, 2014
CVS has announced plans to become the first major U.S. pharmacy chain to stop selling cigarettes and all other tobacco products, despite the fact that it will cost the company an estimated $2 billion in annual sales. CVS plans to have completely removed tobacco products from its 7,600 locations by October 2014, though specific timelines for each store will likely vary. (Photo via Generic Brand Productions) source

CVS has announced plans to become the first major U.S. pharmacy chain to stop selling cigarettes and all other tobacco products, despite the fact that it will cost the company an estimated $2 billion in annual sales. CVS plans to have completely removed tobacco products from its 7,600 locations by October 2014, though specific timelines for each store will likely vary. (Photo via Generic Brand Productions) source

14:52 // 7 months ago
January 7, 2014

Analysis charts huge gains by anti-smoking movement since ‘64

  • 8MAmerican lives saved by anti-smoking efforts since the release of the Surgeon General’s report "Smoking and Health" in 1964, according to analysis published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It found that rates of smoking amongst American adults plunged over the course of the near fifty-year stretch, from 42% in 1964 to just 18% in 2012. In a related editorial, Center for Disease Control director Thomas Frieden hailed “tobacco control” as “described, accurately, as one of the great public health successes of the 20th century.” source
19:40 // 8 months ago
September 24, 2013
20:01 // 12 months ago
July 23, 2013
14:15 // 1 year ago
June 2, 2013
Back in 2007, the cigarette company Camel published an ad wrapped around an illustrated Rolling Stone insert that featured dozens of indie bands—a setup that looked so suspiciously like a giant ad that federal regulators clamped down on Camel (noting that cartoons were banned in cigarette ads) and some of the bands sued. The backlash to this ad was so strong that Camel stopped advertising in magazines for more than five years—a trend that recently changed. (via @cschweitz)

Back in 2007, the cigarette company Camel published an ad wrapped around an illustrated Rolling Stone insert that featured dozens of indie bands—a setup that looked so suspiciously like a giant ad that federal regulators clamped down on Camel (noting that cartoons were banned in cigarette ads) and some of the bands sued. The backlash to this ad was so strong that Camel stopped advertising in magazines for more than five years—a trend that recently changed. (via @cschweitz)

20:48 // 1 year ago
April 22, 2013
19:09 // 1 year ago
August 25, 2012

U.S. Court of Appeals won’t allow graphic cigarette label warnings

  • then The FDA, in an effort to curb the use of tobacco products in American society, began requiring that cigarette packages bear a graphic image on one side – maybe a diseased lung, or the corpse of (ostensibly) an ex-smoker. They were able to do this thanks to a 2009 law bringing tobacco products under federal regulation.
  • now An appeals court handed the tobacco industry a victory, ruling 2-1 that the requirement is unlawful due to free speech protections. “It’s a significant vindication of First Amendment principles,” said Floyd Abrams, attorney for Lorillard Tobacco. Smoking is estimated to lead to 443,000 unnecessary deaths per year. source

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14:34 // 2 years ago
August 24, 2012
This case raises novel questions about the scope of the government’s authority to force the manufacturer of a product to go beyond making purely factual and accurate commercial disclosures and undermine its own economic interest — in this case, by making ‘every single pack of cigarettes in the country mini billboard’ for the government’s anti-smoking message.
U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Janice Rogers Brown • In her opinion regarding the graphic packaging used for cigarette packs, which are federally-regulated. The Washington D.C. Court of Appeals struck down the ads in a 2-1 ruling Friday, with Brown writing that the government “has not provided a shred of evidence” that the packaging actually reduces smoking, and the court as a whole saying that the images violated corporate speech requirements. Five cigarette companies challenged the branding rules — which were upheld by another appeals court, raising the chances that the Supreme Court will rule on the issue.
11:52 // 2 years ago
October 28, 2011

Herman Cain aide Mark Block’s checkered past, abridged edition

  • rise Mark Block started his career in 1974, becoming, at age 18, the youngest elected official in Wisconsin’s history. He spent much of the 1980s coordinating Republican political campaigns in the state.
  • fall In 1997, Block was blocked from Wisconsin politics for a few years for allegedly doing some sketchy stuff with a special interest group. During this time, he worked at Target and his personal life unraveled.
  • recovery In 2005, Block got his mojo back by getting hired as Americans for Prosperity’s director in Wisconsin. He then met a young whippersnapper named Herman Cain, and the rest is chain-smoking historysource

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11:04 // 2 years ago
July 6, 2011
In Iceland, you might need a prescription to smoke
Your doctor may have to give you the go-ahead if you want to keep up the habit. Officials are hoping to do this as an effort to get people to quit. Recently, they’ve raised taxes on cigarettes and they’re on the way to banning them in many public places. Under the proposal, smokers would have to go through treatment programs to try to kick their habit. If they couldn’t pull it off, they’d get prescribed cigarettes. This seems like a bit far to reach, if you ask us, and it could create a black market because it’s so restrictive. Regardless, it should help people quit, should this measure pass —because that’s a lot of trouble to go through for a smoke. (photo via Flickr user mamagrrl) source
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Your doctor may have to give you the go-ahead if you want to keep up the habit. Officials are hoping to do this as an effort to get people to quit. Recently, they’ve raised taxes on cigarettes and they’re on the way to banning them in many public places. Under the proposal, smokers would have to go through treatment programs to try to kick their habit. If they couldn’t pull it off, they’d get prescribed cigarettes. This seems like a bit far to reach, if you ask us, and it could create a black market because it’s so restrictive. Regardless, it should help people quit, should this measure pass —because that’s a lot of trouble to go through for a smoke. (photo via Flickr user mamagrrl) source

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14:09 // 3 years ago