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December 31, 2012
Now as then, the Judicial Branch continues to consume a miniscule portion of the federal budget. In fiscal year 2012, the Judiciary, including the Supreme Court, other federal courts, the Administrative Office of the United States Courts, and the Federal Judicial Center, received a total 4 appropriation of $6.97 billion. That represented a mere two-tenths of one percent of the United States’ total budget of $3.7 trillion. Yes, for each citizen’s tax dollar, only two-tenths of one penny go toward funding the entire third branch of government! Those fractions of a penny are what the courts need to keep court facilities open, pay judges and staff, manage the criminal justice system (including pre-trial, defender, and probation services), process civil disputes ranging from complex patent cases to individual discrimination suits, and maintain a national bankruptcy court system. Those fractions of a penny are what Americans pay for a Judiciary that is second to none.
Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts • Pitching the federal judiciary as an example of fiscal efficiency in the midst of the current fiscal crisis in his year-end report. “No one seriously doubts that the country’s fiscal ledger has gone awry. The public properly looks to its elected officials to craft a solution. We in the Judiciary stand outside the political arena, but we can continue to do our part to address the financial challenges within our sphere,” he also said in his statement. (ht Scotusblog)
23:12 // 1 year ago
April 18, 2012
So, the Washington Post’s The Fix uncovered this doozy of a chart from 2010. 28 percent of people get it. 53 percent not knowing, we guess we can understand. And though John Paul Stevens wasn’t chief justice, he was the court’s senior member in 2010, so it was in the ballpark even if it was wrong. But seriously? Thurgood Marshall? 8 percent? Dude hadn’t been on the court in 19 years by the point this survey was taken, and he never was a Chief Justice. Facepalm. (And don’t get us started on Harry Reid. …)

So, the Washington Post’s The Fix uncovered this doozy of a chart from 2010. 28 percent of people get it. 53 percent not knowing, we guess we can understand. And though John Paul Stevens wasn’t chief justice, he was the court’s senior member in 2010, so it was in the ballpark even if it was wrong. But seriously? Thurgood Marshall? 8 percent? Dude hadn’t been on the court in 19 years by the point this survey was taken, and he never was a Chief Justice. Facepalm. (And don’t get us started on Harry Reid. …)

11:35 // 2 years ago
March 14, 2012
The true issue is whether we can acknowledge the sovereignty of all mighty God over the affairs of our state and our law. That I will not back down from. I will always acknowledge the sovereignty of God and I think we must.
Former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore • Explaining why he will not attempt to place another monument to the Ten Commandments at the state judicial building. Moore finds himself in a position to reclaim his former job as Alabama’s Chief Justice this November, after winning more than 50 percent of the vote during a Republican primary on Tuesday. If he is able to defeat his Democratic challenger, attorney and former gubernatorial candidate Harry Lyon, in November, Moore will replace incumbent Chief Justice Chuck Malone,  the man who replaced him as Chief Justice after he was found guilty of a state ethics violation in 2003. source (viafollow)
17:25 // 2 years ago