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June 6, 2013
shychemist:

agooddaytowhy:

qbits:

likeiknewiwould:

canadian-communist:

Confirmed: Canada 2011 Polls Fraudulent
The Canadian Federal Court has confirmed that the country’s 2011 federal election, which led to the victory of Stephen Harper’s government, was fraudulent.

“Either senior leaders of the Conservative Party were directly involved in election fraud or they were astoundingly negligent in securing access to their voter database. Illegal or incompetent—just like in the Senate scandal.”

Garry Neil, Executive Director of the Council of Canadians said “This Federal Court decision is a major indictment of the Conservative Party of Canada.”
The court emphasized in a Thursday ruling that it has found in no uncertain terms that widespread election fraud took place during the vote. The ruling also stated that “there was an orchestrated effort to suppress votes during the 2011 election campaign by a person with access to the [Conservative Party’s] CIMS database.” Accordingly, the Council of Canadians has called on the Conservative Party to investigate the issue. It says anything less at this point would be a cover-up on behalf of the Conservatives. The Council of Canadians says that the non-cooperation, obstructionism, and attempts to disrupt the Federal Court case by the CIMS makes it look like Prime Minister Harper has something to conceal. 
Source

Outrageous.

Just another day for the Harper government…

It is nice to see my suspicions confirmed. In a a depressing manner.

Just a reminder that this happened.

The above story, from Iran’s Press TV, leaves out a key detail, which I culled from The Hill Times — for Americans, essentially a Canadian version of The Hill:

On May 23, Justice [Richard] Mosley delivered his ruling. While he found the “threshold to establish that fraud occurred” had been met, he did not overturn the 2011 federal election results because there was no evidence that a successful candidate or their agent was responsible for the fraudulent activities, and because he found no evidence that “voter suppression efforts had a major impact on the credibility of the vote.”
Mr. Mosley wrote in his ruling: “I find that electoral fraud occurred during the 41st general election but I am not satisfied that it has been established that fraud affected the outcomes in the subject ridings and I decline to exercise my discretion to annul the results in those districts.”

So while, yes, they did find corruption and fraud, it did not affect the elections, nor did they find the corruption came from the candidates themselves, their staffs, or the Conservative Party. So it’s closer to a split decision. The decision involved the seats of six Conservative MPs.

shychemist:

agooddaytowhy:

qbits:

likeiknewiwould:

canadian-communist:

Confirmed: Canada 2011 Polls Fraudulent

The Canadian Federal Court has confirmed that the country’s 2011 federal election, which led to the victory of Stephen Harper’s government, was fraudulent.
“Either senior leaders of the Conservative Party were directly involved in election fraud or they were astoundingly negligent in securing access to their voter database. Illegal or incompetent—just like in the Senate scandal.”
Garry Neil, Executive Director of the Council of Canadians said “This Federal Court decision is a major indictment of the Conservative Party of Canada.”

The court emphasized in a Thursday ruling that it has found in no uncertain terms that widespread election fraud took place during the vote.

The ruling also stated that “there was an orchestrated effort to suppress votes during the 2011 election campaign by a person with access to the [Conservative Party’s] CIMS database.”

Accordingly, the Council of Canadians has called on the Conservative Party to investigate the issue. It says anything less at this point would be a cover-up on behalf of the Conservatives.

The Council of Canadians says that the non-cooperation, obstructionism, and attempts to disrupt the Federal Court case by the CIMS makes it look like Prime Minister Harper has something to conceal.

Source

Outrageous.

Just another day for the Harper government…

It is nice to see my suspicions confirmed. In a a depressing manner.

Just a reminder that this happened.

The above story, from Iran’s Press TV, leaves out a key detail, which I culled from The Hill Times — for Americans, essentially a Canadian version of The Hill:

On May 23, Justice [Richard] Mosley delivered his ruling. While he found the “threshold to establish that fraud occurred” had been met, he did not overturn the 2011 federal election results because there was no evidence that a successful candidate or their agent was responsible for the fraudulent activities, and because he found no evidence that “voter suppression efforts had a major impact on the credibility of the vote.”

Mr. Mosley wrote in his ruling: “I find that electoral fraud occurred during the 41st general election but I am not satisfied that it has been established that fraud affected the outcomes in the subject ridings and I decline to exercise my discretion to annul the results in those districts.”

So while, yes, they did find corruption and fraud, it did not affect the elections, nor did they find the corruption came from the candidates themselves, their staffs, or the Conservative Party. So it’s closer to a split decision. The decision involved the seats of six Conservative MPs.

(via )

1:13 // 1 year ago
May 3, 2011
nationalpost:

National Post front page for May 3, 2011
Harper proves his doubters wrong again Quebec takes the plunge with the NDP; Duceppe quits After Bin Laden: The manhunt, the raid, the reaction and what comes next

To give you an idea of what happened with the Canadian elections last night.

nationalpost:

National Post front page for May 3, 2011

Harper proves his doubters wrong again
Quebec takes the plunge with the NDP; Duceppe quits
After Bin Laden: The manhunt, the raid, the reaction and what comes next

To give you an idea of what happened with the Canadian elections last night.

9:47 // 3 years ago
May 2, 2011
22:28 // 3 years ago
March 26, 2011
Summary: Explaining Canadian politics (and Stephen Harper) to Americans
Stephen Harper has some pretty huge problems right now. The Canadian Prime Minister’s government was found in contempt by the House of Commons — the first time that’s happened in the country’s history. The situation, pushed by a coalition led by the minority Liberal party, promises to add an interesting twist to Canadian politics over the next six weeks. “The principle at stake in this debate goes to the heart of parliamentary democracy: the obligation of a government to provide members of this House with the information they need in order to hold the government accountable to the people of Canada,” said Liberal Party leader Michael Ignatieff. Now, we understand that many of our readers may not know much about Canadian politics, so here’s a quick explanation of what’s going on:
What happened? Stephen Harper’s Conservative minority government was found in contempt — the first time that’s happened in Canadian history. The contempt vote, pushed by minority parties, also doubled as a no-confidence vote.
What’s next? Tomorrow, Harper is expected go to the Governor-General David Johnston to dissolve parliament. In May, Canadians would vote in the country’s 41st election — the country’s fourth election in roughly seven years.
The reason The three major minority parties — Liberals, New Democrats and Bloc Quebecois — say that the Harper government kept them in the dark on the budgetary elements of certain pieces of legislation, which led to the contempt vote. source
» Other frustrations: The minority parties also have shared frustrations in Harper’s corporate tax cuts and push for increased defense spending on military jets — allowing for the opposition parties to find common ground. If they were to gain control, expect these things to be targets.
How the party lines break down
A plurality government with no majority: The House of Commons — the main voter-elected body in the Canadian government — has led with a plurality government for a few years, strengthening their hold in 2008, but with the 308 seats up for grabs a little over four weeks, the body could change significantly. While polls suggest Harper’s Conservatives could gain a majority this time out, if they don’t, it’s possibile that the three main minority parties (along, possibly, with the Greens, who currently don’t have a seat in the House of Commons) could form their own coalition, forcing Harper off his perch entirely. Here’s what the House of Commons looks like now:
143 Conservatives seats in the House of Commons
77 seats are held by the Liberal Party
47 seats are held by Bloc Quebecois
36 seats are held by the New Democratic Party
» Minor members and the Senate: On top of the parties here, two of House of Commons seats are held by independent candidates, and three seats are currently empty. Also of note: The Canadian parliament also has a Senate, but it isn’t directly elected, is kind of a messy situation of its own, and holds no say over the situation with Harper or the government.  Harper’s job lies in the hands of the confidence of the House of Commons — which he just lost. (By the way, our boy Ilya Gerner has a pretty interesting take on the whole Canadian plurality system worth checking out.)
Harper’s take on the issue

Unfortunately, Mr. Ignatieff and his coalition partners in the NDP and Bloc Quebecois made abundantly clear that they had already decided they wanted an election instead, Canada’s fourth election in seven years, an election Canadians had told them clearly that they did not want. Thus the vote today, which obviously disappoints me, and will, I suspect, disappoint most Canadians.

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper • Discussing his frustrations with the current contempt vote. The polls seem to suggest that many back Harper’s take on the situation — the party still holds a strong plurality in two recent polls, and in one holds over 40 percent — enough for the Conservatives to hold a technical majority. Other parties say that, either way, Harper’s uncooperative leadership style made his bed. “He made a choice,” said NDP leader Jack Layton “and that choice was to take us into an election.” source

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Stephen Harper has some pretty huge problems right now. The Canadian Prime Minister’s government was found in contempt by the House of Commons — the first time that’s happened in the country’s history. The situation, pushed by a coalition led by the minority Liberal party, promises to add an interesting twist to Canadian politics over the next six weeks. “The principle at stake in this debate goes to the heart of parliamentary democracy: the obligation of a government to provide members of this House with the information they need in order to hold the government accountable to the people of Canada,” said Liberal Party leader Michael Ignatieff. Now, we understand that many of our readers may not know much about Canadian politics, so here’s a quick explanation of what’s going on:

  • What happened? Stephen Harper’s Conservative minority government was found in contempt — the first time that’s happened in Canadian history. The contempt vote, pushed by minority parties, also doubled as a no-confidence vote.
  • What’s next? Tomorrow, Harper is expected go to the Governor-General David Johnston to dissolve parliament. In May, Canadians would vote in the country’s 41st election — the country’s fourth election in roughly seven years.
  • The reason The three major minority parties — Liberals, New Democrats and Bloc Quebecois — say that the Harper government kept them in the dark on the budgetary elements of certain pieces of legislation, which led to the contempt vote. source

» Other frustrations: The minority parties also have shared frustrations in Harper’s corporate tax cuts and push for increased defense spending on military jets — allowing for the opposition parties to find common ground. If they were to gain control, expect these things to be targets.

How the party lines break down

A plurality government with no majority: The House of Commons — the main voter-elected body in the Canadian government — has led with a plurality government for a few years, strengthening their hold in 2008, but with the 308 seats up for grabs a little over four weeks, the body could change significantly. While polls suggest Harper’s Conservatives could gain a majority this time out, if they don’t, it’s possibile that the three main minority parties (along, possibly, with the Greens, who currently don’t have a seat in the House of Commons) could form their own coalition, forcing Harper off his perch entirely. Here’s what the House of Commons looks like now:

  • 143 Conservatives seats in the House of Commons
  • 77 seats are held by the Liberal Party
  • 47 seats are held by Bloc Quebecois
  • 36 seats are held by the New Democratic Party

» Minor members and the Senate: On top of the parties here, two of House of Commons seats are held by independent candidates, and three seats are currently empty. Also of note: The Canadian parliament also has a Senate, but it isn’t directly elected, is kind of a messy situation of its own, and holds no say over the situation with Harper or the government.  Harper’s job lies in the hands of the confidence of the House of Commons — which he just lost. (By the way, our boy Ilya Gerner has a pretty interesting take on the whole Canadian plurality system worth checking out.)

Harper’s take on the issue

Unfortunately, Mr. Ignatieff and his coalition partners in the NDP and Bloc Quebecois made abundantly clear that they had already decided they wanted an election instead, Canada’s fourth election in seven years, an election Canadians had told them clearly that they did not want. Thus the vote today, which obviously disappoints me, and will, I suspect, disappoint most Canadians.
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper • Discussing his frustrations with the current contempt vote. The polls seem to suggest that many back Harper’s take on the situation — the party still holds a strong plurality in two recent polls, and in one holds over 40 percent — enough for the Conservatives to hold a technical majority. Other parties say that, either way, Harper’s uncooperative leadership style made his bed. “He made a choice,” said NDP leader Jack Layton “and that choice was to take us into an election.” source

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0:29 // 3 years ago