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June 26, 2013
Look at the man’s watch. Nice piece of time-telling for Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, right? Well, there’s a reason it’s so nice: As sources tell the Washington Post, the $6,500 Rolex watch came from a wealthy donor, and it was not mentioned in his financial filings. (Apparently, the donor bought it for McDonell thanks to urging from the governor’s wife.) Anyway, let’s not fault him. He needs the watch to tell him when to drink his next Boost.

Look at the man’s watch. Nice piece of time-telling for Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, right? Well, there’s a reason it’s so nice: As sources tell the Washington Post, the $6,500 Rolex watch came from a wealthy donor, and it was not mentioned in his financial filings. (Apparently, the donor bought it for McDonell thanks to urging from the governor’s wife.) Anyway, let’s not fault him. He needs the watch to tell him when to drink his next Boost.

0:09 // 10 months ago
July 16, 2012

Well, that’s dirty: Sarah Silverman has an indecent proposal for GOP superdonor and casino magnate Sheldon Adelson — as long as he gives his $100 million to Obama. (PG-13 subject matter, FYI, probably NSFW; ht Distriction)

13:40 // 1 year ago
November 6, 2010
Before you know it my iPhone can’t turn it’s screen off because I’m getting near constant push notifications of retweets.
Twitter user (and SFB reader) Eric Fadden • Explaining how he became something of a Twitter celebrity yesterday after a key point that he made in the Keith Olbermann saga received 2,500 retweets. The tweet? “Gotta love the new campaign contribution rules. Keith Olbermann donates as a citizen and gets suspended. A corp can give & remain nameless.” Fadden says that around 90 percent of the tweeters agreed him, but the other ten percent were very critical. To that, he says: “Has the polarization gotten that bad where we would mock one of our own as their rights are trampled by their employer…nay, even worse, when that employer enjoys more protection than those it employs?” Good point, Eric. It’s good to point out that the game is a little different for journalists, but Olbermann is biased and should not be held to the standard of a reporter. Meanwhile, General Electric can anonymously influence the electoral process as they choose. source (viafollow)
14:13 // 3 years ago
November 5, 2010

Why MSNBC’s Keith Olbermann decision was a really bad idea

Keith Olbermann stepped in it when he donated to a political candidate. What happened next, though, was a really bad precedent for MSNBC that’ll prove more controversial than Olbermann’s original move was. While we don’t think Keith should’ve been donating to candidates immediately after talking to them on TV, we also think the punishment doesn’t fit the crime. It also opens NBC Universal up to double standards, especially if Gawker’s right, and MSNBC doesn’t actually have the standards that NBC News does. Some other points to come out of this whole mess:

  • one Even William Kristol, a conservative commentator who has no reason to support the ideologically opposed Olbermann, had his back, which was really nice of him.
  • two Salon offers up another relevant point: If CNBC were held to the same standards as Olbermann, most of their staff would have to be suspended. Oy vey. source

» Correction: An earlier version of this post noted The Nation’s Washington Editor, Chris L. Hayes, no longer doing a replacement MSNBC show because of campaign contributions of his own. This was based on a still-online Wall Street Journal article. Hayes himself denied the allegations: “OK: I’m not filling in on Countdown tonight because I didn’t feel comfortable doing it given the circumstances. My not hosting tonight has *nothing* to do with several donations I made to two friends *before* I ever signed an MSNBC contract.” Thanks to Ilya Gerner and Susan Pruden for tipping us off to this. (And for reading!)

20:14 // 3 years ago