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November 18, 2012
A historic visit: For the first time ever, a sitting U.S. president has visited Myanmar (or if you roll that way, Burma), a country long cut off from the outside world. The president, accompanied by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, isn’t going there to endorse the government he claims, but the steps it needs to take. The official U.S. Embassy account for the country has more.

A historic visit: For the first time ever, a sitting U.S. president has visited Myanmar (or if you roll that way, Burma), a country long cut off from the outside world. The president, accompanied by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, isn’t going there to endorse the government he claims, but the steps it needs to take. The official U.S. Embassy account for the country has more.

22:39 // 1 year ago
July 12, 2012
reuters:

U.S. praise for Myanmar grows by the day, but Secretary of State Hillary Clinton still cannot bring herself to use the name of the country in the presence of officials from the former Burma.
It appears Clinton did not wish to offend Myanmar’s government and its diplomats in Phnom Penh by referring to the country by the name officially used in Washington, Burma - two short syllables that rile the former generals who now lead its nascent democracy.

ShortFormBlog says: Just refer to it as “Burmamar,” and call it a day.

reuters:

U.S. praise for Myanmar grows by the day, but Secretary of State Hillary Clinton still cannot bring herself to use the name of the country in the presence of officials from the former Burma.

It appears Clinton did not wish to offend Myanmar’s government and its diplomats in Phnom Penh by referring to the country by the name officially used in Washington, Burma - two short syllables that rile the former generals who now lead its nascent democracy.

ShortFormBlog says: Just refer to it as “Burmamar,” and call it a day.

17:39 // 2 years ago
April 18, 2012

Suu Kyi to leave Myanmar for first time in a quarter-century

  • storyLess than two years after being released from house arrest, Aung San Suu Kyi and 42 fellow members of the National League for Democracy were elected to Myanmar’s year-old parliament during elections on April 1.
  • outcomeReuters has confirmed that the Nobel Peace Prize laureate and newly elected lawmaker will travel outside of Myanmar for the first time in 24 years, after accepting invitations to visit both Britain and Norway in June. source
14:32 // 2 years ago
April 2, 2012
We hope that this will be the beginning of a new era where there will be more emphasis on the rule of the people in the everyday politics of our country.
Myanmar pro-democracy figure Aung San Suu Kyi • Speaking about her party’s victory in Sunday’s elections — the National League for Democracy won nearly all of the 45 seats up for grabs, including one for the Nobel laureate herself. Suu Kyi says her party will push for constitutional changes and an end to ethnic conflicts. This may be tough, however — they won 45 seats out of several hundred, and the ones already there are filled by military and military supporters, and the constitution was written by the military. But the success on Sunday was nonetheless a breakthrough for a democratic movement.
10:28 // 2 years ago
April 1, 2012
Myanmar elections: Aung San Suu Kyi wins seat in parliament
A turning point in a democratically-repressed country? With an unofficial vote count having her at 82 percent, the Nobel Laureate, who spent most of the past two decades under house arrest, is likely to find herself on the other side of the political process. Her party, the National League for Democracy, also says it won 10 other seats in the contest. The election, however, did not come without hitches — with allegations of harassment and vote-tampering reported. The military government hopes, however, that the relatively minor instances will convince Western governments to cut back on economic sanctions that have long crippled the country. Is this the point where things change for the better in Myanmar? Or is it more complicated than that? (photo by Barbara Walton/EPA)

Myanmar elections: Aung San Suu Kyi wins seat in parliament

A turning point in a democratically-repressed country? With an unofficial vote count having her at 82 percent, the Nobel Laureate, who spent most of the past two decades under house arrest, is likely to find herself on the other side of the political process. Her party, the National League for Democracy, also says it won 10 other seats in the contest. The election, however, did not come without hitches — with allegations of harassment and vote-tampering reported. The military government hopes, however, that the relatively minor instances will convince Western governments to cut back on economic sanctions that have long crippled the country. Is this the point where things change for the better in Myanmar? Or is it more complicated than that? (photo by Barbara Walton/EPA)

10:31 // 2 years ago
January 9, 2012
Myanmar: Aung San Suu Kyi plans to run for parliamentary seat
Good for her! The longtime peace activist will run in April’s parliamentary elections, representing the Kawhmu Township area of Yangon. It’s likely she’d be able to win this seat, and if she does, she’d be in a position to lead her party in parliament, leading to some major committee assignments for the long-imprisoned political figure. Fingers crossed! (photo by edenpictures on Flickr) source
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Good for her! The longtime peace activist will run in April’s parliamentary elections, representing the Kawhmu Township area of Yangon. It’s likely she’d be able to win this seat, and if she does, she’d be in a position to lead her party in parliament, leading to some major committee assignments for the long-imprisoned political figure. Fingers crossed! (photo by edenpictures on Flickr) source

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23:03 // 2 years ago
January 5, 2012
Myanmar: Aung San Suu Kyi’s opposition party can run in elections: Suu Kyi, shown with British Foreign Secretary William Hague, spent most of the past two decades under house arrest. It’s not clear if she will run in the highly-anticipated elections herself, however. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Myanmar: Aung San Suu Kyi’s opposition party can run in elections: Suu Kyi, shown with British Foreign Secretary William Hague, spent most of the past two decades under house arrest. It’s not clear if she will run in the highly-anticipated elections herself, however. source

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10:38 // 2 years ago
December 28, 2011

Large, unexplained explosion hits near Myanmar’s largest city

  • 17+ killed in a blast in a suburb of Yangon, the country’s largest city, early Thursday morning local time
  • 80+ injured in the blast; witnesses said several smaller blasts followed the main explosion source

» Details still limited: Local officials have as of yet not explained what caused the blast. ”There are many casualties. We are not in a position to give you further information. We are still looking into it,” said a police officer from Mingalar Taungnyunt Township Police Station.

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21:08 // 2 years ago
December 1, 2011
Hillary Clinton offers Myanmar incentive to reform itself: The Secretary of State has been in Myanmar for the past day or so. “I came to assess whether the time is right for a new chapter in our shared history,” she says. The U.S. is willing to reward Myanmar for implementing reforms. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Hillary Clinton offers Myanmar incentive to reform itself: The Secretary of State has been in Myanmar for the past day or so. “I came to assess whether the time is right for a new chapter in our shared history,” she says. The U.S. is willing to reward Myanmar for implementing reforms. source

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20:38 // 2 years ago
November 30, 2011

Secretary of State Clinton arrives in Myanmar today

  • 56 years since a U.S. official had last visited Myanmar source

» When preparing to fly into the isolated South Asian country, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was forced to depart early from a stop in South Korea, because the airfield in Myanmar’s capitol lacks runway lights to facilitate nighttime landings. On her schedule for the next three days: a meeting with Thein Sein, the General-turned-President, who despite being viewed as a moderate reformer (compared to the norms under decades of brutal military rule) still has the familiar trappings of a leader wrapped in a fraudulent democratic process — he won the last election with over 90% of the vote. She’ll also be visiting opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, a dissident who’s been jailed or under house arrest for most of the last twenty years.

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14:06 // 2 years ago