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August 20, 2013
15:17 // 8 months ago
August 19, 2013
He betrayed the United States. For that betrayal he deserves to spend the majority of his remaining life in prison.
Captain Joe Morrow • During his closing statements, on behalf of the prosecution in the trial of Pfc. Bradley Manning, which also included a call for the presiding judge Colonel Denise Lind to send Manning to jail for at least 60 years. Col. Lind has already ruled out the possibility of any sentence longer than 90 years, despite the fact that the accumulated charges against Pfc. Manning technically qualify him for up to 136 years behind bars, but has given no other indicator of what to expect from the sentence when it arrivess either this week or next. source
19:21 // 8 months ago
August 15, 2013

I was dealing with a lot of issues, issues that are ongoing and continuing to affect me. Although a considerable difficulty in my life, these issues are not an excuse for my actions.

I understood what I was doing, and decisions I made. However, I did not fully appreciate the broader effects of my actions.

Those factors are clear to me now, through both self-refection during my confinement in various forms, and through the merits and sentencing testimony that I have seen here.

I am sorry for the unintended consequences of my actions. When I made these decisions I believed I was going to help people, not hurt people.

Pfc. Bradley Manning • In a brief statement, delivered before Judge Col. Denise Lind during the sentencing phase of Manning’s trial. Pfc. Manning was found guilty on 20 of the 21 charges brought against him by prosecutors, for leaking hundreds of thousands of diplomatic cables to WikiLeaks back in 2010, and faces up to 90 years in prison if given the maximum penalty for each count. A sentence is expected to be handed down sometime next week. (ht Ars Technica) source
15:01 // 8 months ago
August 30, 2012
18:57 // 1 year ago
June 26, 2012
16:24 // 1 year ago
April 25, 2012
Wikileaks: Bradley Manning’s request to dismiss denied by judge: Army Col. Denise Lind, the judge in the case, denied the dismissal during a pretrial hearing, meaning the case will go forward. The trial is tentatively set to start in September. source Find us on Twitter! • Stalk us on Facebook!

Wikileaks: Bradley Manning’s request to dismiss denied by judge: Army Col. Denise Lind, the judge in the case, denied the dismissal during a pretrial hearing, meaning the case will go forward. The trial is tentatively set to start in September. source

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10:43 // 1 year ago
December 21, 2011

By witness counts alone, the odds are stacked against Bradley Manning

  • twenty number of witnesses prosecutors called against Bradley Manning, who faces charges of leaking classified information, over a four-day period
  • two number of witnesses the defense called before they said they were done — it took them part of Wednesday morning source

» What could happen to Manning? The man who allegedly gave Wikileaks its biggest coup could face the death penalty if convicted in his case — though the Army’s prosecutors have made it clear that they will not ask for that. Among the people who have testified against Manning: Jihrleah Showman, a former team leader of Manning’s who claims he once punched her in the face, and Adrian Lamo, the “grey hat” hacker who gained infamy in some circles for turning Manning in to federal authorities.

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11:04 // 2 years ago
November 29, 2011
Bradley Manning’s attorney: Wikileaks release didn’t hurt anybody
An interesting defense strategy: The lawyers for the long-held-in-detention Bradley Manning, the former soldier who allegedly gathered and the diplomatic cables that Wikileaks eventually released, are apparently angling for the “these cables didn’t actually cause any problems” angle, noting in a court documents released Monday that the White House and the Defense Department reviewed the cables and found nothing damaging, due to the fact that the data was outdated, already publicly-released or represented low-level information. Manning’s first hearing — finally — is December 16. (thanks Michael Cote) source
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An interesting defense strategy: The lawyers for the long-held-in-detention Bradley Manning, the former soldier who allegedly gathered and the diplomatic cables that Wikileaks eventually released, are apparently angling for the “these cables didn’t actually cause any problems” angle, noting in a court documents released Monday that the White House and the Defense Department reviewed the cables and found nothing damaging, due to the fact that the data was outdated, already publicly-released or represented low-level information. Manning’s first hearing — finally — is December 16. (thanks Michael Cote) source

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21:38 // 2 years ago