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January 12, 2014
18:19 // 7 months ago
October 17, 2013
19:16 // 10 months ago
January 2, 2013
12:08 // 1 year ago
October 9, 2012

think4yourself:

buzzfeed:

politicsbuzz:

Andrew Sullivan’s weeklong Obama meltdown in 8 GIFs.

Andrew Sullivan has had a long week, guys.

meltdown is putting it lightly

Though you have to admit, his response to the article was pretty spot-on.Buzzfeed has some fun. I deserve it. I think Sullivan’s a legend at the blogging game, but they totally nailed this and created what’s probably their best article all week.

21:38 // 1 year ago
September 14, 2012

PITCH: Is Tumblr the Next Time, Inc?

onaunconference:

Once upon a time, the jobs in journalism were all at what we would consider traditional outlets — Time, Newsweek, ABC News, the Washington Post, etc. But these days, journalists who’ve had their pick of those publications are flocking to tech companies like Tumblr, Facebook and Twitter to create stories — content that competes, in breadth and scope, with the highest-caliber traditional publications. As print suffers a slow and painful decline, it’s not just the web that’s changing journalism as we know it — it’s tech companies like Tumblr and Facebook who are launching what could be the new new media movement. But what does this mean for the future of traditional journalistic outlets? Can a journalist remain objective when she’s employed by a company? Are journalists’ future homes in places that aren’t primarily about journalism, and should it be?

Read More

Interesting question. A thought on this: Tumblr is also creating a community of writers and journalists who wouldn’t need a job with traditional media with a little help on the traffic or monetization side. It’s one thing for Tumblr to hire people. It’s another for Tumblr to enable people to make their blog their full-time gig — so folks like those who went to Tampa and Charlotte to cover the conventions could rely on their work as their main source of income. There’s a lot more opportunity in that market (they already have the content verticals, without even really trying), and Tumblr could do more to tap the community’s creativity so it becomes sustainable creativity, the kind that strengthens the work they’re already doing.

(Source: onauncon2012, via wnyc)

21:27 // 1 year ago
September 3, 2012
0:38 // 1 year ago
February 24, 2012
When I started planning the site last summer, my plan was to make it more of a general-interest site. Then in November, when I left Poynter, I pretty much abandoned that plan to compete against my former employer. Finding a new tagline is on my to-do list.
Blogger Jim Romenesko • Discussing why his “blog about media and other things I’m interested in” only seems to feature media posts. For a single individual, Romenesko is doing quite well on the blogging front, nearing the level of his former employer, Poynter, all by himself. He’s doing so well that his ad provider, BlogAds, is already talking about raising his rates. Not bad for a guy whose reputation took a public hit (though not without his defenders) a couple of months back.
12:04 // 2 years ago
December 8, 2011
More on the case of Crystal Cox: A good decision made poorly?
The “blogger-not-a-journalist” thing still sticks, but … In the past few days, there’s been a bit of an uproar on the decision by a federal judge to decide, in a defamation case, that investigative blogger Crystal Cox isn’t a journalist protected by shield laws. We were ticked, too. However, Forbes reporter Kashmir Hill disputes the way the story was first presented by Seattle Weekly, which broke the story: “The facts in the case are far more complicated, and after hearing them, most journalists will not want to include Cox in their camp.” Hill points out that it appeared Cox was attempting to engage in reputation damage, not journalism, including sending out the e-mail shown above, in which Cox reportedly offered reputation-protection services. And ultimately, Cox’s claims —the ones that hit court after she was forced to give up her source — didn’t hold up to scrutiny. The fact of the matter is, the shield law element of this shouldn’t have even come up in the case: Even without it the claims wouldn’t have held up, according to Kevin Padrick, who claims ruin at the hands of Cox’s many sites. source
Follow ShortFormBlog

The “blogger-not-a-journalist” thing still sticks, but … In the past few days, there’s been a bit of an uproar on the decision by a federal judge to decide, in a defamation case, that investigative blogger Crystal Cox isn’t a journalist protected by shield laws. We were ticked, too. However, Forbes reporter Kashmir Hill disputes the way the story was first presented by Seattle Weekly, which broke the story: “The facts in the case are far more complicated, and after hearing them, most journalists will not want to include Cox in their camp.” Hill points out that it appeared Cox was attempting to engage in reputation damage, not journalism, including sending out the e-mail shown above, in which Cox reportedly offered reputation-protection services. And ultimately, Cox’s claims —the ones that hit court after she was forced to give up her source — didn’t hold up to scrutiny. The fact of the matter is, the shield law element of this shouldn’t have even come up in the case: Even without it the claims wouldn’t have held up, according to Kevin Padrick, who claims ruin at the hands of Cox’s many sites. source

Follow ShortFormBlog

12:57 // 2 years ago
December 7, 2011

jacjacattack says: i read your post about the oregon blogger, crystal cox, and i would love to hear your thoughts on the now-official divide between journalist and blogger, since you guys are (to my understanding) a bit of both. do you think that the court case will significantly change anything in the blogosphere? has it impacted how you run (or would run) shortformblog? (great blog by the way; very informative. thank you!) x

» SFB says: It’s early, and the decision only affects bloggers in Oregon at this point — and that’s only according to one judge. But now is a good time to definitely comb through journalist shield laws and figure out which states need updating. Seattle Weekly, which broke the story, talked to Bruce E. H. Johnson, the man who wrote the shield law in Washington, and he said this about the case: ”I believe the shield law would have been applied [in Washington state]. Oregon’s law was probably written before blogging was accounted for.” So, the real question is how to get these laws updated for an era where a “journalist” is anyone with a camera phone and a Twitter account. To answer your question: It’s too soon to say it’s had a chilling effect, but if it goes the wrong way, it certainly could. — Ernie @ SFB

11:35 // 2 years ago
Blogger told she’s not a journalist, fined $2.5 million: This is an important case. The Oregon blogger, Crystal Cox, runs a number of legal sites that play whistleblower to various firms. One of those firms, Obsidian Finance Group (they of obsidianfinancesucks.com), sued over defamatory postings. Nearly all of the alleged defamatory postings were thrown out in court — except for one. The post was fact-based, Cox claimed, as it was based on a source inside the company. But here’s the important part: A federal court claims that she’s not a journalist (as she doesn’t work for a media organization), despite the fact that the post was journalistic in nature, and she’s not subject to the shield laws that protect journalists in her state. Hence … the fine. This is important. Follow this story.
Edit: As the story continues to get press play, the story is becoming more complicated. More details here.

Blogger told she’s not a journalist, fined $2.5 million: This is an important case. The Oregon blogger, Crystal Cox, runs a number of legal sites that play whistleblower to various firms. One of those firms, Obsidian Finance Group (they of obsidianfinancesucks.com), sued over defamatory postings. Nearly all of the alleged defamatory postings were thrown out in court — except for one. The post was fact-based, Cox claimed, as it was based on a source inside the company. But here’s the important part: A federal court claims that she’s not a journalist (as she doesn’t work for a media organization), despite the fact that the post was journalistic in nature, and she’s not subject to the shield laws that protect journalists in her state. Hence … the fine. This is important. Follow this story.

Edit: As the story continues to get press play, the story is becoming more complicated. More details here.

0:27 // 2 years ago