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April 20, 2011
9:45 // 3 years ago
February 19, 2011
So, we did have a right to be concerned that people would misunderstand our post about Libya and bit.ly and act like we were being flip when we really weren’t. However, the source for such concern hit the wrong target. Sorry notnadia. :/

So, we did have a right to be concerned that people would misunderstand our post about Libya and bit.ly and act like we were being flip when we really weren’t. However, the source for such concern hit the wrong target. Sorry notnadia. :/

16:06 // 3 years ago

More on the Libya/bit.ly thing

notnadia:

We live in a real, global environment. “How will Libya’s political situation effect my personal, shorthanded Twitter links?” True story.

I had a feeling someone was going to make a rebuttal like this, so I may as well respond. All this is not to say that this is the main issue at stake here (or that bit.ly were particularly wise in getting a domain from the Libyan government), but there is a real technical question here that people may be concerned about. We were wondering it ourselves, so it was worth looking into. Another way to frame this: Do we really want these cutesy domain names to help fund (and bring attention to) the Libyan government, who clearly have some major human rights problems? Because that’s where it’s going – to the Libyan government.

(Source: shortformblog)

15:17 // 3 years ago

Libya’s unrest won’t affect Bit.ly’s domains at all, guys

  • NO Libya’s unrest won’t affect Bit.ly’s URL-shortening source

» When clever names go bad: As we have noted in the past, Bit.ly’s name is tied very closely to Libya. However, as the Interwebs have gone down of late in the country, many are wondering if this means anything bad for the URL shortener market, which also counts owl.ly and ht.ly as potential victims, among others. We’ll let Bit.ly’s CEO, John Borthwick, take it from here: “For .ly domains to be unresolvable the five .ly root servers that are authoritative *all* have to be offline, or responding with empty responses. Of the five root nameservers for the .ly TLD: two are based in Oregon, one is in the Netherlands and two are in Libya.” And plus, they have backup plans in place, like j.mp or bitly.com. So no, nothing to worry about.

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15:03 // 3 years ago
December 2, 2010
Bitly News gives short links the Hacker News treatment
Thinks we like: Bit.ly. Twitter. Hacker News. Bitly.tv. Now what if someone mashed up Bit.ly links found on Twitter to look like Hacker News, but with the ranking style that Bitly.tv uses? Well, friends, you’d have Bitly News. Which is the coolest thing we’ve seen today. source
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Thinks we like: Bit.ly. TwitterHacker News. Bitly.tv. Now what if someone mashed up Bit.ly links found on Twitter to look like Hacker News, but with the ranking style that Bitly.tv uses? Well, friends, you’d have Bitly News. Which is the coolest thing we’ve seen today. source

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12:24 // 3 years ago
October 8, 2010

Thanks, Libya: Bit.ly links could become a thing.ly of the past.ly

  • standing out, clever.ly A popular way to make your name stand out nowadays is to have the domain end in .ly, something hugely popular Twitter-centric services such as Bit.ly and Hootsuite (though its ow.ly and ht.ly services) have taken advantage of. The two-letter length also helps. Oh yeah, Mitt Romney uses it for his mitt.ly domain.
  • unfortunate.ly for themPerhaps this wasn’t thought through all the way, because the .ly domain is owned by Libya, a country not exactly known for its sparkling human rights record. And the country is upset about all the NSFW links that get shared on the services, putting entire business models in danger. Uh-oh. source
15:11 // 3 years ago