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December 31, 2013
ShortFormBlog Turns Five: Stuff You Probably Shouldn’t Have Missed in 2013
Five years ago (January 1, 2009 to be exact), I was sitting in a bagel shop, staring at my laptop, ready to tell the world about this weird thing I was working on. The moment it went online, everything changed in my life, and suddenly I was running a daily news site. I kept doing it every day, and even got a couple of extra folks on board. So much has evolved—from changes in jobs and marital status, to even the primary platform I built the site on—but five years later, ShortFormBlog is a daily part of what keeps me moving each day. So, on the occasion of its fifth anniversary, I’d like to take a moment to do that thing we’re best at: Reflect on the news. Click on to read about some of the things that defined 2013.
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The year’s darkest moment came at the finish line of a foot race in Boston. It shut down a city for a full day, left many dead and injured, and led to a careless amateur manhunt that the New York Post gave careless front-page airtime. But it also brought together a city, and showed that everyday heroes are not a thing of the past. We needed the reminder.
The situation in Syria, torn asunder by years of civil war, remains a room without much light (or internet). With alliances shaky at best, compromises coming from odd circumstances (and not always followed through) and a human toll far beyond what anyone could have imagined, Syria remains a country where easy answers are far from view.
Traditional hotspots for diplomatic heartburn end the year in odd places. Light is finally shining in the cracks between Iran and the U.S., while North Korea dramatically executed a former top leader and held a senior citizen while getting tight with Dennis Rodman. Hugo Chavez is gone, and the Afghan War lingers like old laundry.
It was kind of a bad year for journalism: People got stuff wrong, other people lost access they rely on, clickbait was king, and even fake newspapers were shutting down their print editions. All of which means, of course, that journalism is ripe for parody right now. But every listicle in the world couldn’t hold back Edward Snowden this year.
And Washington: What can you say about This Town? Nothing got done, the country shut down, and Obamacare’s launch was objectively disastrous. But while 14th Street improves and former scribes drop truth bombs, is the rest of the country being left behind? Probably. Painfully.

So, that’s where we stand right now. 2013 left us a lot of drama, a lot of bad politics, and a lot of bad journalism. But it was a good year, no matter how many Marissa Mayer GIFs showed on on your dashboard in the past twelve months. Tumblr’s still here, and it’s still pretty cool. So that’s that.
As always, thanks for reading. See ya next year. — Ernie @ SFB
(photo by Wilson-Fam/Flickr)

ShortFormBlog Turns Five: Stuff You Probably Shouldn’t Have Missed in 2013

Five years ago (January 1, 2009 to be exact), I was sitting in a bagel shop, staring at my laptop, ready to tell the world about this weird thing I was working on. The moment it went online, everything changed in my life, and suddenly I was running a daily news site. I kept doing it every day, and even got a couple of extra folks on board. So much has evolved—from changes in jobs and marital status, to even the primary platform I built the site on—but five years later, ShortFormBlog is a daily part of what keeps me moving each day. So, on the occasion of its fifth anniversary, I’d like to take a moment to do that thing we’re best at: Reflect on the news. Click on to read about some of the things that defined 2013.

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19:29 // 8 months ago
February 11, 2013

stfuconservatives:

vpbiden:

This Day in History: February 11th, 2006: Vice President Dick Cheney accidentally shoots his friend in the face while hunting

Because remember: if we outlaw guns, only vice presidents will accidentally shoot people in the face.

Happy birthday, best story of the 21st century so far.

17:39 // 1 year ago
January 1, 2013
Hey guys, it’s our birthday: The stuff we learned in 2012
After finishing your champagne, Nosh on some cake! As you may or may not know, ShortFormBlog started in earnest on January 1, 2009, and things have kind of gone pretty crazy since then. Among the milestones we hit this year? A nice little mention from Time Magazine, a night at the Shorty Awards (where I got a chance to say hey to the We Are the 99 Percent folks), and some of our coolest articles ever. But we got into this because of the news, so with that said, hit the jump to see our favorite stories from 2012, displayed Summary Sandwich style. — Ernie @ SFB
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The year’s biggest story, and what we learned from covering it The Chicago Sun-Times nailed it earlier this week, rough as it is to admit. With two major shootings and the major debate it caused, it’s the year of the gun. The question is, will things change in 2013?
How Hurricane Sandy brought us together after the storm In 2011, a hurricane got fairly close to causing major damage to NYC. In 2012, it actually happened. The monetary toll was high; so was the resiliency.
The year that politics went totally flip(-flop) The trend started in 2011 with a smiling Herman Cain. In 2012, we got Etch-a-Sketches, doghouses and binders full of women. Will 2013 be a year off?
Oh yeah, Obama won a second term or something Nate Silver called it. Though the president had a fallow period after the first debate, he eventually made it back. And he got on the cover of Time, too.
The ever-precarious situation in Sryia Syria was very volatile in 2012, but we kept you guys up to date. Meanwhile, there’s already too much drama around Benghazi, so let’s focus on those lost.
The opportunities we got to stretch our wings and try new things One of the best things we got to try in 2012 was The Pitch, an experiment in writing long-form articles. We also got the chance to experiment with the form a little, which was a real joy.
» And again, thank you: The reason SFB has continued to be fun after all this time has been because of the people we get to chat with and talk about the news with through this site. Seeing a post of ours impact so many people is awesome, and it’s something we look forward to doing in 2013. So again, thank you, from the entire team. (photo by Mamapyjama/Flickr)

Hey guys, it’s our birthday: The stuff we learned in 2012

After finishing your champagne, Nosh on some cake! As you may or may not know, ShortFormBlog started in earnest on January 1, 2009, and things have kind of gone pretty crazy since then. Among the milestones we hit this year? A nice little mention from Time Magazine, a night at the Shorty Awards (where I got a chance to say hey to the We Are the 99 Percent folks), and some of our coolest articles ever. But we got into this because of the news, so with that said, hit the jump to see our favorite stories from 2012, displayed Summary Sandwich style. — Ernie @ SFB

Read More

0:35 // 1 year ago
September 15, 2012
usatoday:

futurejournalismproject:

lookatluca:

Happy Birthday, USA Today. The newspaper critics once described as “television you can wrap fish in” is turning 30-years-old. Read “A Newspaper That Influenced Us All” in Garcia Media, a fascinating look back at what this project meant to the industry and its design community.

FJP Fun Fact:  USA Today did try to launch a television program. Called, originally enough, USA Today: The Television Show, it launched in 1988 and was cancelled a year and a half later due to poor ratings. 
FJP Quibble: USA Today launched on September 15th, 1982, so happy pre-birthday.

A very kind post here from Mario Garcia — and today’s our 30th birthday! We’re looking forward to the next 30 years.

Ball-shaped logo or not, fact is that USA Today did a lot to modernize newspapers. Happy birthday, fellas!

usatoday:

futurejournalismproject:

lookatluca:

Happy Birthday, USA Today. The newspaper critics once described as “television you can wrap fish in” is turning 30-years-old. Read “A Newspaper That Influenced Us All” in Garcia Media, a fascinating look back at what this project meant to the industry and its design community.

FJP Fun Fact:  USA Today did try to launch a television program. Called, originally enough, USA Today: The Television Show, it launched in 1988 and was cancelled a year and a half later due to poor ratings. 

FJP Quibble: USA Today launched on September 15th, 1982, so happy pre-birthday.

A very kind post here from Mario Garcia — and today’s our 30th birthday! We’re looking forward to the next 30 years.

Ball-shaped logo or not, fact is that USA Today did a lot to modernize newspapers. Happy birthday, fellas!

15:15 // 2 years ago
May 26, 2012
guardian:

Happy 75th anniversary Golden Gate Bridge!
Photograph: Doug Atkins/AP

Golden Gate Birthday.

guardian:

Happy 75th anniversary Golden Gate Bridge!

Photograph: Doug Atkins/AP

Golden Gate Birthday.

(via journalofajournalist)

10:23 // 2 years ago
May 16, 2012
nprfreshair:

How Common Is Your Birthday?
(via @stiles)

People with lighter colors are more unique. There. We said it.

nprfreshair:

How Common Is Your Birthday?

(via @stiles)

People with lighter colors are more unique. There. We said it.

(via theatlantic)

8:56 // 2 years ago
January 8, 2012
Stephen Hawking turns 70, misses his own birthday speech: Hawking, one of many famous people (Elvis, David Bowie, Kim Jong-Un) to have a birthday today, was recovering from an infection, but pre-recorded the speech ahead of time. He’s turning 70, despite doctors predicting he wouldn’t pass 25. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Stephen Hawking turns 70, misses his own birthday speech: Hawking, one of many famous people (Elvis, David Bowie, Kim Jong-Un) to have a birthday today, was recovering from an infection, but pre-recorded the speech ahead of time. He’s turning 70, despite doctors predicting he wouldn’t pass 25. source

Follow ShortFormBlog

22:01 // 2 years ago
11:52 // 2 years ago
It is time to acknowledge this failure and adopt a more effective course for the federal role in education. Policymakers must abandon their faith-based embrace of test-and-punish strategies and, instead, pursue proven alternatives to guide and support the nation’s neediest schools and students.
A policy assessment written by Lisa Guisbond, Monty Neill and Bob Schaeffer • Suggesting that No Child Left Behind, the Bush-era education law passed under bipartisan circumstances, should go the way of the dodo. The policy, now seen as an example of ineffective government overreach by many, celebrates its 10th birthday today, and politicians who once supported the law — including Rick Santorum, who voted for it and tried to push an intelligent design amendment into the bill — no longer do. Guisbond, Neill and Schaeffer’s report, which suggests revisiting the law based on the lessons learned from the past decade, is available to read over heresource (viafollow)
11:44 // 2 years ago
Happy birthday, Kim Jong-Un! The new North Korean leader’s birthday, his first as Supreme Leader of North Korea, was celebrated by the country’s propaganda machine thanks to a documentary that aired on state television. The video reveals him riding a horse, hanging at an amusement park, and  … most importantly, suggesting way back in 2009 that he’d be willing to wage war with South Korea and the U.S. if they shot down a North Korean rocket. In other words, bro knows a thing or two about threats.

Happy birthday, Kim Jong-Un! The new North Korean leader’s birthday, his first as Supreme Leader of North Korea, was celebrated by the country’s propaganda machine thanks to a documentary that aired on state television. The video reveals him riding a horse, hanging at an amusement park, and  … most importantly, suggesting way back in 2009 that he’d be willing to wage war with South Korea and the U.S. if they shot down a North Korean rocket. In other words, bro knows a thing or two about threats.

11:28 // 2 years ago