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May 1, 2012
Based on this above article, you might expect the threat from al-Qaeda is basically gone, right? Well, perhaps you should read these other articles first. As we pointed out in our analysis on Sunday, media outlets left and right are saying al-Qaeda’s threat is basically gone a year after Osama bin Laden’s death. Or it isn’t. 

Based on this above article, you might expect the threat from al-Qaeda is basically gone, right? Well, perhaps you should read these other articles first. As we pointed out in our analysis on Sunday, media outlets left and right are saying al-Qaeda’s threat is basically gone a year after Osama bin Laden’s death. Or it isn’t. 

10:00 // 2 years ago
April 29, 2012

Bin Laden widows, deported from Pakistan, allowed into Saudi Arabia

  • unwelcome After a year of custody in Pakistan after the death of Osama bin Laden, three women who were married to the al-Qaeda leader were deported from Pakistan last week. The women were jailed for staying in the country illegally. The women lived with bin Laden at the time of the Seal Team Six raid.
  • welcome Despite the trouble the widows and their 11 children faced in Pakistan, they’re being welcomed by Saudi Arabia with open arms. “Saudi Arabia acted out of humanitarian considerations… in so far as there are no reports or evidence of any implication in criminal or illegal acts,” a spokesperson said. source

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8:23 // 2 years ago
January 24, 2012
To close out, Obama again pulls out the Bin Laden hook he used at the beginning:

One of my proudest possessions is the flag that the SEAL Team took with them on the mission to get bin Laden.  On it are each of their names.  Some may be Democrats.  Some may be Republicans.  But that doesn’t matter.  Just like it didn’t matter that day in the Situation Room, when I sat next to Bob Gates – a man who was George Bush’s defense secretary; and Hillary Clinton, a woman who ran against me for president.   All that mattered that day was the mission.  No one thought about politics.  No one thought about themselves.  One of the young men involved in the raid later told me that he didn’t deserve credit for the mission.  It only succeeded, he said, because every single member of that unit did their job – the pilot who landed the helicopter that spun out of control; the translator who kept others from entering the compound; the troops who separated the women and children from the fight; the SEALs who charged up the stairs.  More than that, the mission only succeeded because every member of that unit trusted each other – because you can’t charge up those stairs, into darkness and danger, unless you know that there’s someone behind you, watching your back. 

Think this was totally the right way to intro — and end — his speech.

To close out, Obama again pulls out the Bin Laden hook he used at the beginning:

One of my proudest possessions is the flag that the SEAL Team took with them on the mission to get bin Laden.  On it are each of their names.  Some may be Democrats.  Some may be Republicans.  But that doesn’t matter.  Just like it didn’t matter that day in the Situation Room, when I sat next to Bob Gates – a man who was George Bush’s defense secretary; and Hillary Clinton, a woman who ran against me for president.  
 
All that mattered that day was the mission.  No one thought about politics.  No one thought about themselves.  One of the young men involved in the raid later told me that he didn’t deserve credit for the mission.  It only succeeded, he said, because every single member of that unit did their job – the pilot who landed the helicopter that spun out of control; the translator who kept others from entering the compound; the troops who separated the women and children from the fight; the SEALs who charged up the stairs.  More than that, the mission only succeeded because every member of that unit trusted each other – because you can’t charge up those stairs, into darkness and danger, unless you know that there’s someone behind you, watching your back. 

Think this was totally the right way to intro — and end — his speech.

22:19 // 2 years ago
August 15, 2011
10:39 // 3 years ago
July 27, 2011
10:23 // 3 years ago
July 14, 2011

airzona says: Thoughts on the New York Observer article that almost outs the CIA operative that hunted Bin Laden down?

» SFB says: The NY Observer wasn’t in the wrong for printing it, though you need to approach these types of things with kid gloves (do you think they did?); the CIA was in the wrong for not being careful enough to make sure his identity was hidden. — Ernie @ SFB

12:18 // 3 years ago
June 24, 2011

Osama bin Laden seriously considered changing al-Qaeda’s name

  • what In the months before his death, the leader of the terrorist group considered giving al-Qaeda a different name, according to a letter retrieved by special forces officials after he was killed back in May. It was a sign of Bin Laden attempting to keep the group relevant.
  • why The  name “al-Qaeda” stands for “the base,” which Bin Laden thought didn’t strike a religious pose. He wanted a name that emphasized that they were going to holy war with the enemies of Islam. He had nothing to worry about; “al-Qaeda” did the trick. source
11:17 // 3 years ago
June 16, 2011

Counter-terrorism experts fear intro attack by Zawahiri

  • relief? Ayman al-Zawahiri’s rise to the top spot in the al-Qaeda organization bears some positive realities for the United States. Namely, he is nowhere near as charismatic or effective a leader as Osama bin Laden was.
  • danger One big risk with having a new leader uncertain of how loyal his people are, is that he might feel the need to assert himself with a splash. As such, counter-terrorism experts fear a possible “big” attack in the near term. source
17:51 // 3 years ago
June 11, 2011

On whether these al-Qaeda deaths are directly resulting from bin Laden’s death

thenoobyorker asks: HIPSTER TERRORIST, JUST LOOK AT THIS “THE KILLS” INSPIRED PHOTO. Do you think that all of these new Al-Qaeda losses have something to do with Osama’s data?

» SFB says: While we don’t have the proof directly in front of us, the fact of the matter is, seeing all these deaths of key al-Qaeda figures within weeks of one another suggests the data had at least some role. Some of that data was probably time-sensitive and the kind of thing they would’ve had to act fast on to have any sort of effect. But the big question: Does the data offer information to break down the structure of al-Qaeda, beyond its leadership? (Also, the first half of your response = LULZ.) — Ernie @ SFB

14:09 // 3 years ago
June 8, 2011
The sheikh has departed, may God have mercy on him, to his God as a martyr and we must continue on his path of jihad to expel the invaders from the land of Muslims and to purify it from injustice.
Al-Qaeda’s second-in-command, Ayman al-Zawahri • Eulogizing the death of Osama bin Laden in a recently-released 28-minute recording. He had some rough words for the U.S., too, obviously: “Today, and thanks be to God, America is not facing an individual or a group … but a rebelling nation which has awoken from its sleep in a jihadist renaissance.” Al-Zawahri, al-Qaeda’s longtime number two, was reportedly passed up for the top job after Bin Laden’s death. In other news, a recent poll suggests widespread global support for the killing of Bin Laden, though most people think it won’t change things. source (viafollow)
11:39 // 3 years ago