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February 9, 2014

Stuff you may have missed: February 9, 2014

Bill Keller, the longtime New York Times executive editor who spent the last few years as an opinion writer for the paper, is moving on to lead a nonprofit journalism organization. Should be fun to watch, as long as he passes on criticizing cancer patients.

A suspected drunk driver in California drove the wrong way on an expressway and ended up killing at least six people. Awful. But worse when you consider that a similar crash happened in Florida, killing five.

Edward Snowden defeated the NSA’s security mechanisms using wget, which is an open-source command line program more common than QBasic.

Microsoft is so desperate to get people to upgrade from Windows XP that it’s asking people to pressure their friends.

T-Mobile does not want competitors using magenta in their marketing—and a court agrees.

20:54 // 2 months ago
December 5, 2013
Mr. Mandela’s quest for freedom took him from the court of tribal royalty to the liberation underground to a prison rock quarry to the presidential suite of Africa’s richest country. And then, when his first term of office was up, unlike so many of the successful revolutionaries he regarded as kindred spirits, he declined a second term and cheerfully handed over power to an elected successor, the country still gnawed by crime, poverty, corruption and disease but a democracy, respected in the world and remarkably at peace.
Nelson Mandela, South Africa’s Liberator as Prisoner and President, Dies at 95,” The New York Times. It’s a 6,625-word obit, written by iconic NYT journalist Bill Keller, no less.
18:02 // 4 months ago
July 29, 2012

A game of what’s-the-difference: Two Bill Keller articles, one major difference

Top: A Bill Keller article about Wikileaks, suggesting that the Times’ financial mechanisms were being targeted by the State Department. It uses this line: "I find myself in the awkward position of having to defend WikiLeaks."

Bottom: A recent Keller article about something else. Structurally, it looks almost exactly the same, except it doesn’t sport a wonky-looking Tweet button right below the byline. Hop to the jump to find out the big difference between the two.

Read More

14:33 // 1 year ago
September 19, 2011
9:50 // 2 years ago
June 2, 2011
soupsoup:

Josh Haner instagrams the big move at NY Times

Also relevant here: This tweet.

soupsoup:

Josh Haner instagrams the big move at NY Times

Also relevant here: This tweet.

(via inothernews)

11:17 // 2 years ago

Shakeup at the NYT: Executive editor Bill Keller’s going back to writing

nightline:

“Bill Keller, the newspaper’s current executive editor, is stepping down to return to writing.”

— BREAKING: Jill Abramson Named New Executive Editor Of The New York Times • Today in announcements we’re not sure how we feel about. (via markcoatney)

Maybe Jill will get Twitter a little better than her predecessor.

10:44 // 2 years ago
May 18, 2011
19:05 // 2 years ago
My father, who was trained in engineering at M.I.T. in the slide-rule era, often lamented the way the pocket calculator, for all its convenience, diminished my generation’s math skills. Many of us have discovered that navigating by G.P.S. has undermined our mastery of city streets and perhaps even impaired our innate sense of direction. Typing pretty much killed penmanship. Twitter and YouTube are nibbling away at our attention spans. And what little memory we had not already surrendered to Gutenberg we have relinquished to Google. Why remember what you can look up in seconds?
Bill Keller, executive editor of the New York Times, is afraid of the Internet (via soupsoup)
12:10 // 2 years ago
March 8, 2011
I think if you’re a regular viewer of Fox News, you’re among the most cynical people on planet Earth. I cannot think of a more cynical slogan than ‘Fair and Balanced.’
New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller • Assessing Fox News while speaking at the City University of New York graduate journalism school late last week. As you might guess, the comments weren’t taken particularly well, partly because he’s the executive editor of the New York Times and the NYT regularly breaks news about Fox News. Including, uh, like two days ago. Now, considering how hard-up they are about their objectivity (this piece on Nate Silver is a pretty great example), it’s a reasonable criticism – and one that sticks a little harder than the one about Anderson Cooper using the word “liar.” Because, unlike that, he landed a direct blow on a competitor that compromises his paper’s objectivity. source
21:36 // 3 years ago