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February 27, 2012
I talked to the driver Tony Raines on Saturday and told him that since he’s starting at the back of the pack in the 21st row, I said, you know, let’s use the Santorum — let’s use the Santorum strategy. Hang back, let the other cars in front get in wrecks and — or drop out of the race, and then move up at the end. That’s hopefully the pattern he’ll use.
Rick Santorum, offering up allegorical racing advice to Tony Raines, the driver of the Rick Santorum-themed vehicle at the Daytona 500. The race has been delayed multiple times due to rain, the first time that’s happened in its history.
11:01 // 2 years ago
February 26, 2012

On dingleberries

attackofthe says: Why is someone a “dingleberry” for accepting sponsorship from a politician? Great “journalism”.

» SFB says: Because it’s called “making a joke.” Have a sense of humor. (EDIT: The reader responded below; again, don’t take the comment so seriously because it was clearly meant with jest. If you can’t handle that, find another blog.) — Ernie @ SFB

10:47 // 2 years ago
September 26, 2011
Meet the country’s most innovative/sketchy payday loan lender
According to the Wall Street Journal, Scott Tucker has a really impressive story. Tucker, a late-blooming race star who scored a third-place finish at the Rolex 24 at Daytona endurance race earlier this year, only picked up auto racing about five years ago, and he’s earned such fame that he had a documentary about his life air on the Discovery Channel. But here’s the part this storyline doesn’t tell us — how he got here. Sure, the WSJ’s story calls him a “private investor,” but the Center for Public Integrity notes he earned his significant fortune — enough to start up his own auto-racing team — by running a payday lending company. This company uses partnerships with Native American tribes as a front to get around laws designed to protect consumers — allowing his company to do incredibly sketchy things, such as hiding its address and shielding itself from lawsuits using shell companies. Somehow, this is legal. And Tucker won’t be talking about it himself. “Due to a confidentiality agreement, I am not permitted to discuss the business of my employer,” he said about his businesses. Read the report at the source link — the first part in a series. source
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According to the Wall Street Journal, Scott Tucker has a really impressive story. Tucker, a late-blooming race star who scored a third-place finish at the Rolex 24 at Daytona endurance race earlier this year, only picked up auto racing about five years ago, and he’s earned such fame that he had a documentary about his life air on the Discovery Channel. But here’s the part this storyline doesn’t tell us — how he got here. Sure, the WSJ’s story calls him a “private investor,” but the Center for Public Integrity notes he earned his significant fortune — enough to start up his own auto-racing team — by running a payday lending company. This company uses partnerships with Native American tribes as a front to get around laws designed to protect consumers — allowing his company to do incredibly sketchy things, such as hiding its address and shielding itself from lawsuits using shell companies. Somehow, this is legal. And Tucker won’t be talking about it himself. “Due to a confidentiality agreement, I am not permitted to discuss the business of my employer,” he said about his businesses. Read the report at the source link — the first part in a series. source

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20:38 // 2 years ago