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July 5, 2013

Death toll rises in wake of Egyptian coup

30 killed in Egypt today as protests over President Morsi’s ouster flare up around the country. Muslim Brotherhood supporters are calling today the “Friday of Rage,” and over 10,000 have taken to the streets to protest the President’s removal two days ago by the military. The National Salvation front, which supported Morsi’s overthrow, has called for counter-protests this Sunday. source

20:34 // 1 year ago
July 3, 2013
Tanks are rolling through Cairo. Meanwhile, Reuters reports that the military has erected “barbed wire and barriers” around the building in which President Morsi is currently located (UPDATE: I’m having trouble confirming that this picture is indeed from today’s events in Egypt; some have pointed out that the people seem to be wearing winter clothes).
EDIT: As the Daily Beast’s Sam Schlinkert notes, this image is indeed from 2011.

Tanks are rolling through Cairo. Meanwhile, Reuters reports that the military has erected “barbed wire and barriers” around the building in which President Morsi is currently located (UPDATE: I’m having trouble confirming that this picture is indeed from today’s events in Egypt; some have pointed out that the people seem to be wearing winter clothes).

EDIT: As the Daily Beast’s Sam Schlinkert notes, this image is indeed from 2011.

13:22 // 1 year ago

Military coup? Egyptian president moved to Defense Ministry building, armored military vehicles fill streets

Don’t don’t want to jump the gun here, but it certainly looks like a military coup is in the process of taking place in Egypt. 

12:23 // 1 year ago
May 31, 2013

American woman killed in Syrian civil war; regime reported to have upper hand

163 people killed in Syria today, according to a local activist committee. The fact that one of them was a Michigan woman has turned heads at the State Department; according to both AP and John McCain, the regime has recently gained the upper hand in the two-year-old conflict, which has claimed roughly 80,000 lives so far. source

16:31 // 1 year ago
May 15, 2013
17:50 // 1 year ago
April 25, 2013
14:32 // 1 year ago
December 6, 2012
0:22 // 1 year ago
November 23, 2012
A year after Hosni Mubarak’s fall, new round of protests in Egypt: Tear gas filled the streets and 15 were injured in protests after President Mohammed Morsi issued a decree yesterday greatly expanding his own power. The decree shields any of the president’s decisions from legal challenge until a new parliament is elected; protects the Islamist-dominated assembly, which is in the process of crafting a new constitution for the country, from being dissolved; and calls for retrials of Hosni Mubarak and other members of the old guard. 18 liberal and Christain members of the aforementioned assembly recently withdrew from the process, claiming that their input wasn’t being addressed; Morsi’s claims that his decree will only be in effect until the new constitution is drafted. Both pro- and anti-Morsi protesters clashed in Egyptian streets today, numbering in the thousands. source [1] [2] [3] (Photo credit: Reuters)

A year after Hosni Mubarak’s fall, new round of protests in Egypt: Tear gas filled the streets and 15 were injured in protests after President Mohammed Morsi issued a decree yesterday greatly expanding his own power. The decree shields any of the president’s decisions from legal challenge until a new parliament is elected; protects the Islamist-dominated assembly, which is in the process of crafting a new constitution for the country, from being dissolved; and calls for retrials of Hosni Mubarak and other members of the old guard. 18 liberal and Christain members of the aforementioned assembly recently withdrew from the process, claiming that their input wasn’t being addressed; Morsi’s claims that his decree will only be in effect until the new constitution is drafted. Both pro- and anti-Morsi protesters clashed in Egyptian streets today, numbering in the thousands. source [1] [2] [3] (Photo credit: Reuters)

15:18 // 1 year ago
October 22, 2012
Keep in mind that I and Americans took leadership in forming a coalition [in Libya]… Liberated a country that had been under a dictator for 40 years… and as a result, you had thousands of Libyans in the streets saying, ‘America is our friend.’
President Obama, touting his decision to enter the coalition that deposed former Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi.
21:10 // 1 year ago
September 12, 2012
[Romney’s] doubling down on criticism of the President for the statement coming out of Cairo is likely to be seen as one of the most craven and ill-advised tactical moves in this entire campaign.
Time’s Mark Halperin. In case you missed it: Yesterday, Mitt Romney knocked President Obama for “sympathiz[ing] with those who waged the attacks” on US diplomatic compounds in Libya and Egypt. This claim was false to begin with—Obama didn’t express any sympathy for the attackers—but was made all the more awkward when, six hours after Romney’s statement, news came out that the US ambassador to Libya was killed in the attacks. After that revelation, Romney doubled-down on his attacks on POTUS, and so now, it seems a bit as if Romney is claiming that Obama supported the killing of one of his own ambassadors. Notable here is that very few prominent Republicans are backing Romney up on this—he’s more or less alone.  source
14:20 // 2 years ago