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November 3, 2011
Ever wanted to rent a book on your Kindle? Well, now you can!
Kindle and Kindle Fire to have a lending library: The program, which launched today, allows readers to borrow one title at a time per month; when they rent a new title, the previous one will leave their device. Sounds like…not the best plan in the world. The library has over 5,000 titles for readers to choose from, so it’s a little limited. Also, the service is only available to users of Amazon’s Prime service, which costs $79 a year. Stock up! source
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Kindle and Kindle Fire to have a lending library: The program, which launched today, allows readers to borrow one title at a time per month; when they rent a new title, the previous one will leave their device. Sounds like…not the best plan in the world. The library has over 5,000 titles for readers to choose from, so it’s a little limited. Also, the service is only available to users of Amazon’s Prime service, which costs $79 a year. Stock up! source

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23:19 // 2 years ago
September 30, 2011

Report: Amazon’s Kindle Fire losing money with every single device

  • $199 the amount the Amazon Kindle Fire, launched earlier this week, costs
  • $209.63 the amount the Amazon Kindle Fire’s parts are estimated to cost source

» Loss leader vs. straight-up leader: Amazon knows that the thing that was going to get the Kindle Fire to sell was the price, and it appears that even though the device is going to sell at a $10 loss per unit, they’ll make that back quickly through the sale of music and other stuff. This is a situation unlike that of Apple, which sells its devices at a profit and makes money through the sale of content. But that said, Jeff Bezos is looking particularly Jobsian these days.

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14:58 // 2 years ago
September 29, 2011

usualchatter says: As an additional quip about Amazon's Silk and privacy issues. Amazon's EC2 cloud services already host traffic for countless other websites. Netflix for example, serves up it's content thru Amazon. Many webhosts lease out space to customers that they themselves manage on Amazon's servers.

» SFB says: Yep, and Google hosts one of the most widely-used individual Javascript files on the Web, jQuery, as a service for Web users, meaning that millions of people touch that one file daily. This is not to undercut the point about privacy issues here (they exist), but to point out that it seems like the privacy issues are just an excuse to draw controversy and attention around a problem that already exists in numerous other forms, simply because it’s a shiny new thing. — Ernie @ SFB

18:34 // 2 years ago
This makes Amazon like your ISP. Every site, everything you do online [through Silk] will go through Amazon. That’s a new role for someone like them, and I don’t think it’s at all clear that Amazon can step into that, or that it will be apparent to consumers.
Center for Democracy & Technology spokesperson Aaron Brauer-Rieke • Offering up this claim that Amazon will use Silk, which Amazon claims will help speed up Web sites on the Amazon Kindle Fire, as a tracking tool. To that, we say this: Are you guys familiar with this Web browser called Opera Mini? It’s not as common as it once was, but for people using old-school phones, it was a bit of a lifesaver. It made the Motorola Razr, for example, a far more usable phone for surfing the Web, due to the way it handles content — through the company’s own servers, which cleared out all the extra stuff and sped up the sites you were downloading. Sound familiar? It’s exactly what Amazon Silk claims to do. Not buying this whole privacy argument. source (viafollow)
18:12 // 2 years ago
September 28, 2011
11:07 // 2 years ago
thenextweb:

 
Amazon Web Services + Amazon Prime + Amazon Kindle + Amazon App Store + Amazon Instant Video + Amazon MP3= KINDLE FIRE
Live Blog from Amazon’s Tablet Press Event http://tnw.to/1B2HJ 

We’ve read a lot of comments about the Kindle Fire’s seemingly-diminished book-reading abilities. To defend Amazon a bit, it doesn’t look like they’re aiming for their original Kindle target audience here. The original Kindle is still on the market at a far lower price than it was a week ago. This isn’t for the heavy readers, just as the iPad wasn’t for the heavy readers. This is for the people who want a little bit of everything, something which, by the way, Amazon is better-suited to give than most of the other companies out there with tablets. As far as infrastructure goes, Amazon’s got streaming video, it’s got music, it’s got shopping, it’s got a cloud accelerated browser (Editor’s note: !!!!!!!!!!!) and on top of all this, it has books. Barnes and Noble doesn’t have most of this stuff, so even if Amazon’s device itself is a bit thin on the innovation side, the content makes up for it. That’s why we need to take it seriously.

thenextweb:

Amazon Web Services + Amazon Prime + Amazon Kindle + Amazon App Store + Amazon Instant Video + Amazon MP3= KINDLE FIRE

Live Blog from Amazon’s Tablet Press Event http://tnw.to/1B2HJ 

We’ve read a lot of comments about the Kindle Fire’s seemingly-diminished book-reading abilities. To defend Amazon a bit, it doesn’t look like they’re aiming for their original Kindle target audience here. The original Kindle is still on the market at a far lower price than it was a week ago. This isn’t for the heavy readers, just as the iPad wasn’t for the heavy readers. This is for the people who want a little bit of everything, something which, by the way, Amazon is better-suited to give than most of the other companies out there with tablets. As far as infrastructure goes, Amazon’s got streaming video, it’s got music, it’s got shopping, it’s got a cloud accelerated browser (Editor’s note: !!!!!!!!!!!) and on top of all this, it has books. Barnes and Noble doesn’t have most of this stuff, so even if Amazon’s device itself is a bit thin on the innovation side, the content makes up for it. That’s why we need to take it seriously.

11:02 // 2 years ago
10:31 // 2 years ago
Just revealed: What the Amazon Kindle Fire looks like. Looks like a tablet. Dig the bookshelf metaphor. (EDIT: We’re also hearing Amazon’s coming out with a $79 version of the Kindle, which is a pretty big deal all its own.)

Just revealed: What the Amazon Kindle Fire looks like. Looks like a tablet. Dig the bookshelf metaphor. (EDIT: We’re also hearing Amazon’s coming out with a $79 version of the Kindle, which is a pretty big deal all its own.)

10:04 // 2 years ago

Amazon’s Kindle Fire: What it has and doesn’t have

  • included Amazon’s foray into the whole tablet thing (photo here) will be a totally affordable $199 and based on a slick Android-based interface that’s been face-lifted specifically for this freakin’ tablet.
  • missing It’s only 7 inches — a bit small for you iPad fans — and lacks such amenities as a microphone or camera. On top of this, the device is wifi-only — no 3G. Is no 3G a deal-breaker, guys? source
9:58 // 2 years ago