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April 6, 2014
So Nigeria has now supplanted South Africa as Africa’s largest economy. But I’ve not had light (electricity) for seven days, so it means nothing to me.
A Nigerian social media user • Upon hearing that revised economic figures in the country—a revision 24 years in the making—put the country’s GDP (currently at $510 billion) far ahead of South Africa (currently at $353 billion) and other countries in the African continent. To give you an idea of how long it’s been: During the last GDP check in 1990, 300,000 landlines existed in the country. Now, there are 100 million cell phones. But that GDP level, above developed countries such as Chile, Sweden, and Belgium, belies a tough reality in the country—70 percent of the country’s population still lives in poverty.
18:04 // 4 months ago
December 21, 2013

Stuff you may have missed: December 21, 2013

President Obama has started a 17-day vacation in Hawaii, a vacation which will have a little bit of work—he’ll have daily briefings on the healthcare law and on national security—but (he hopes) a lot of rest.

Four men were arrested Saturday for their suspected roles in a New Jersey car-jacking that led to the death of a lawyer, who was killed in front of his wife after a day of Christmas shopping last weekend.

Worst possible way to lose a job: Write racist tweet before jumping on plane to Africa, fail to use the in-flight internet, and create a PR crisis for your company. (Oh yeah, you’re in charge of PR.)

Stuart Little meets Benjamin Button: Scientists have figured out a way to make the muscles in mice way younger.

Beyonce handed out $37,500 in gift cards at a Wal-Mart on Friday night.

18:53 // 8 months ago
December 9, 2013
Across the desert, the wind combs the sand into smooth ripples that roll out evenly for miles. So when a hole is dug, you see it immediately. The sand looks agitated. Its pattern is disturbed. That’s how you know where the bodies are buried. Close to three dozen people in northern Mali disappeared earlier this year, killed or taken away by the country’s military, according to human rights groups. The victims were caught in a backlash against Arabs and Tuaregs, desert people who form a small and shrinking ethnic minority in Mali. As the West Africa bureau chief for The Associated Press, I wanted to know what had happened to them.
An AP reporter beautifully chronicles their trip to hunt down where conflict killings were buried in Mali. 
9:00 // 8 months ago
July 10, 2013

Apparently, leftover campaign shirts from Mitt Romney’s presidential run are being put to good use in Kenya. Philanthropist Cyndy Waters founded a charity, The Orbit Village Project, that provides clothes and housing to impoverished Kenyans, and it just so happens that Waters’ nephew worked for Romney’s campaign last year. After the election, the nephew had a bunch of shirts left over, and so Waters gave them to the Kenyan kids. “It was a big deal that they could pick between short or long sleeved and blue and white,” Waters said. “For an African youth from such an impoverished area to pick out something new is very rare.” (Image credit: Orbit Village Project) source

11:58 // 1 year ago
January 14, 2013
15:23 // 1 year ago
September 30, 2012
africaisdonesuffering:

Battabox
Launching early in January of this year, Battabox has quickly become a household name in Nigeria. Bringing a new and different approach to News and Entertainment, Battabox aims to give Nigerians a chance to have an input in how their news and stories are being shared. Their tagline is ‘Nigeria like you’ve never seen before’ and that is exactly what they show you. From important news features to silly everyday activities, Battabox covers it all; giving the viewers, as well as those involved, a different perspective on things going on in Nigeria. We had the opportunity of speaking with the founder, who happens to be the ex-CNN correspondent to West Africa, Christian Purefoy, who gave us insight to what Battabox is about.
Rise Africa: I see you studied International politics and International History in University, was there anything in particular that attracted you to Journalism?
Christian Purefoy: I got into Journalism because I enjoy writing. That was the main thing; studying international politics obviously helped. I enjoy it because for me, it’s a big part of what makes the world go round. I had an opportunity to go to Nigeria so I followed that through. Funnily enough I got into it because of the writing but I ended up in video and enjoyed that even more.
read the rest of the interview

This is really cool stuff. The site, if you’re curious, is over here.

africaisdonesuffering:

Battabox

Launching early in January of this year, Battabox has quickly become a household name in Nigeria. Bringing a new and different approach to News and Entertainment, Battabox aims to give Nigerians a chance to have an input in how their news and stories are being shared. Their tagline is ‘Nigeria like you’ve never seen before’ and that is exactly what they show you. From important news features to silly everyday activities, Battabox covers it all; giving the viewers, as well as those involved, a different perspective on things going on in Nigeria. We had the opportunity of speaking with the founder, who happens to be the ex-CNN correspondent to West Africa, Christian Purefoy, who gave us insight to what Battabox is about.

Rise Africa: I see you studied International politics and International History in University, was there anything in particular that attracted you to Journalism?

Christian Purefoy: I got into Journalism because I enjoy writing. That was the main thing; studying international politics obviously helped. I enjoy it because for me, it’s a big part of what makes the world go round. I had an opportunity to go to Nigeria so I followed that through. Funnily enough I got into it because of the writing but I ended up in video and enjoyed that even more.

read the rest of the interview

This is really cool stuff. The site, if you’re curious, is over here.

(via globalvoices)

15:46 // 1 year ago
September 25, 2012
humanrightswatch:

The Islamist armed groups have become increasingly repressive as they have tightened their grip over northern Mali. Stonings, amputations, and floggings have become the order of the day in an apparent attempt to force the local population to accept their world view. In imposing their brand of Sharia law, they have also meted out a tragically cruel parody of justice and recruited and armed children as young as 12.
Read more after the break.

"On July 30, the Islamist authorities in Aguelhoc stoned to death a married man and a woman he was not married to for adultery, reportedly in front of 200 people. They also have punished women for failing to adhere to their dress code – which requires women to cover their heads, wear long skirts, and desist from wearing jewelry or perfume – and for having contact with men other than family members.” Scary stuff.

humanrightswatch:

The Islamist armed groups have become increasingly repressive as they have tightened their grip over northern Mali. Stonings, amputations, and floggings have become the order of the day in an apparent attempt to force the local population to accept their world view. In imposing their brand of Sharia law, they have also meted out a tragically cruel parody of justice and recruited and armed children as young as 12.

Read more after the break.

"On July 30, the Islamist authorities in Aguelhoc stoned to death a married man and a woman he was not married to for adultery, reportedly in front of 200 people. They also have punished women for failing to adhere to their dress code – which requires women to cover their heads, wear long skirts, and desist from wearing jewelry or perfume – and for having contact with men other than family members.” Scary stuff.

10:18 // 1 year ago
July 28, 2012

Ugandan health officials trying to contain fresh Ebola outbreak

  • 13 killed in Ebola virus outbreak in Uganda since late June source

» Emergency health measures in place: One of the most virulent diseases in the world, the Ebola outbreak, centered on the Kibaale district of Uganda, was only confirmed as such recently. This is bad — Ebola has no vaccine and a 90 percent death rate. Most of the deaths are tied to a single family, who contracted the disease at a recent funeral. Seven others have fallen ill due to the disease. (thanks @sorta_like_art)

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16:25 // 2 years ago
July 12, 2012
humanrightswatch:

Central African Republic: LRA Attack Near Hunting Reserve
The Ugandan rebel group, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), carried out attacks from June 21 to 25, 2012, near a remote hunting concession outside Bakouma, in the Central African Republic (CAR). The attackers killed at least two civilians and abducted at least 14 others. The attacks followed killings of 13 civilians in the same area in March.

To be clear, this is the same Lord’s Resistance Army as associated with Kony 2012.

humanrightswatch:

Central African Republic: LRA Attack Near Hunting Reserve

The Ugandan rebel group, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), carried out attacks from June 21 to 25, 2012, near a remote hunting concession outside Bakouma, in the Central African Republic (CAR). The attackers killed at least two civilians and abducted at least 14 others. The attacks followed killings of 13 civilians in the same area in March.

To be clear, this is the same Lord’s Resistance Army as associated with Kony 2012.

(via npr)

10:31 // 2 years ago
April 24, 2012
Sudan, South Sudan move closer to war: South Sudanese leader Salva Kiir (shown above), in China to meet with President Hu Jintao, said Tuesday that his country’s “neighbour in Khartoum has declared war on the Republic of South Sudan.” This follows a comment by Sudan’s Omar al-Bashir last week that suggested they would crush the “insect” government to the south. The two countries — as a country, South Sudan is less than a year old — are locked in a deadly battle over a contested border, augmented by concerns over the valuable oil supply in the region. (photo by Phil Moore/AFP; EDIT: Removed use of phrase “civil war,” which was accidental. Apologies.)

Sudan, South Sudan move closer to war: South Sudanese leader Salva Kiir (shown above), in China to meet with President Hu Jintao, said Tuesday that his country’s “neighbour in Khartoum has declared war on the Republic of South Sudan.” This follows a comment by Sudan’s Omar al-Bashir last week that suggested they would crush the “insect” government to the south. The two countries — as a country, South Sudan is less than a year old — are locked in a deadly battle over a contested border, augmented by concerns over the valuable oil supply in the region. (photo by Phil Moore/AFP; EDIT: Removed use of phrase “civil war,” which was accidental. Apologies.)

10:54 // 2 years ago