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July 16, 2012

Romney uses Obama’s singing in attack ad: The goal appears to be to make Al Green sound as sinister as possible, and to play up his ties to big-ticket donors. If this seems like a kind of below-the-belt style of attack ad, it’s worth noting that Obama did the same thing with Mitt Romney’s singing over the weekend:

Though in Obama’s case, the attacks stick a little better. But we’re in the period of of the political season where the attack ads appear to be in a race to the bottom. Nobody wins. Especially not the viewers.

9:20 // 2 years ago
June 22, 2012
15:29 // 2 years ago
June 18, 2012
If you use your force and dream big, you can achieve anything. We may be small but we are mighty.
"Little Darth Vader" Max Page • In a statement following his successful open-heart surgery on Saturday. The seven year old, famous for his appearance in a Force-inspired Volkswagen Passat ad, suffers from Tetralogy of Fallot, a congenital heart disease that has caused him to require multiple heart surgeries since his diagnosis at three months of age. However, thanks to his most recent procedure, Page may not find himself in need of another procedure until he’s 22. source (viafollow)
17:24 // 2 years ago
June 11, 2012
newsweek:

There’s a full-fledged Obama for America takeover going on at Talking Points Memo right now.

Oh, don’t you mean Baracking Points Memo? That said, it’s not like Obama’s never done this before.

newsweek:

There’s a full-fledged Obama for America takeover going on at Talking Points Memo right now.

Oh, don’t you mean Baracking Points Memo? That said, it’s not like Obama’s never done this before.

20:32 // 2 years ago
interestingsnippets:

(via Do Not Track Is An Opportunity, Not a Threat | John Battelle’s Search Blog)  This is a mockup — for now anyway. But speaking personally, I think it would be fair enough; albeit with the addition of a 3rd option “click to pay (eg: 2$) for a months access to ad-free version” or similar.  

First off, to emphasize again: This is a mockup, not real. But it’s rare to see Microsoft ahead of the curve on something like “Do Not Track,” which will be turned on by default on IE10. The solution for sites which could suffer from this type of change is to be upfront about it. Or, you know, to change up their model a little. Either way, let’s not do more stuff like this.

interestingsnippets:

(via Do Not Track Is An Opportunity, Not a Threat | John Battelle’s Search Blog)  This is a mockup — for now anyway. But speaking personally, I think it would be fair enough; albeit with the addition of a 3rd option “click to pay (eg: 2$) for a months access to ad-free version” or similar.  

First off, to emphasize again: This is a mockup, not real. But it’s rare to see Microsoft ahead of the curve on something like “Do Not Track,” which will be turned on by default on IE10. The solution for sites which could suffer from this type of change is to be upfront about it. Or, you know, to change up their model a little. Either way, let’s not do more stuff like this.

(via journo-geekery)

10:28 // 2 years ago
June 5, 2012
10:47 // 2 years ago
Disney puts its kids-focused advertisers on a diet
Still watch Saturday morning cartoons? Or, perhaps, The Disney Channel? In case you do, you may soon stop seeing ads for sugary cereals, candy or other unhealthy products. The company is enacting a new policy called the  ”Mickey Check” that will only allow for nutritionally-approved products to be sold on their shows, Web sites, or other branded products. On top of this, the company will cut back on sodium in the kids meals served in its theme parks and increase its efforts to promote exercise and healthy eating. Only downside: Due to currently-existing contracts, the ads won’t change over fully until 2015. Hey, Michael Bloomberg: this is how you do it.

Disney puts its kids-focused advertisers on a diet

Still watch Saturday morning cartoons? Or, perhaps, The Disney Channel? In case you do, you may soon stop seeing ads for sugary cereals, candy or other unhealthy products. The company is enacting a new policy called the  ”Mickey Check” that will only allow for nutritionally-approved products to be sold on their shows, Web sites, or other branded products. On top of this, the company will cut back on sodium in the kids meals served in its theme parks and increase its efforts to promote exercise and healthy eating. Only downside: Due to currently-existing contracts, the ads won’t change over fully until 2015. Hey, Michael Bloomberg: this is how you do it.

10:34 // 2 years ago
May 23, 2012
Spotted: Politico is using the data from this report, which shows that it literally has a perfect balance between Democratic and Republican voters among its readership, to advertise itself. (The ad links to this story.) Because, you know, it’s better than promoting the fact that it has some of the nastiest comment threads on the entire internet. 

Spotted: Politico is using the data from this report, which shows that it literally has a perfect balance between Democratic and Republican voters among its readership, to advertise itself. (The ad links to this story.) Because, you know, it’s better than promoting the fact that it has some of the nastiest comment threads on the entire internet. 

0:00 // 2 years ago
May 17, 2012

Speaking of anti-Obama ads, here’s the early output of Karl Rove’s $25 million campaign to take on the president with attack ads. (Unlike the WTF thing we posted earlier, the attacks are strictly related to fiscal policy.) The Obama camp has already responded with a point-by-point YouTube video. Which is smart.

10:46 // 2 years ago
May 15, 2012
theawl:

skidder:

AdWeek requires you to share certain stories in order to finish reading them. Why would I want to share something I can’t read? And is there anything more desperate a publisher can do? Gross.

I want to talk to the evil stupid-genius that invented this.

This is slightly worse than this image we ganked last week:

Soft paywalls like these are simply terrible ideas.

theawl:

skidder:

AdWeek requires you to share certain stories in order to finish reading them. Why would I want to share something I can’t read? And is there anything more desperate a publisher can do? Gross.

I want to talk to the evil stupid-genius that invented this.

This is slightly worse than this image we ganked last week:

Soft paywalls like these are simply terrible ideas.

11:13 // 2 years ago