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November 18, 2012
Currently on the NYT front page: This massive ad arguing from a National Parks association arguing for action on the Fiscal Cliff. This took up way more than half of the front page.

Currently on the NYT front page: This massive ad arguing from a National Parks association arguing for action on the Fiscal Cliff. This took up way more than half of the front page.

21:13 // 1 year ago
November 9, 2012
searchengineland:

Yes it’s here, a list of the most expensive keywords in Google. This is only a partial list, but you can check out the full list here.

There’s good money in asbestos.

searchengineland:

Yes it’s here, a list of the most expensive keywords in Google. This is only a partial list, but you can check out the full list here.

There’s good money in asbestos.

14:30 // 1 year ago
October 22, 2012

lateralsymmetry says: The story of the Seattle Times running an ad for a gubernatorial candidate (ostensibly to raise recognition of their own advertising power) is garnering them a lot of criticism. My question: how does running an ad for a candidate differ from writing an endorsement? I'd love to hear your thoughts.

» SFB says: Newspapers are set up with separators between the various departments, including news, editorial and advertising. The goal is that they’re not supposed to have influence on what they do for one another, especially financially. The Seattle Times making an endorsement in their editorial pages shouldn’t have an effect on their coverage, and political ads shouldn’t have an effect on the news coverage or the editorial page. The Seattle Times, on the other hand, ran political ads for a candidate and cause the management supported in an effort to promote the value of political advertising in print. This was a bad idea — mainly because it set a terrible precedent. (And also, there’s this thing called the Ad Council which does this kind of thing already.) If someone bought the ad for Rob McKenna in the Times, it would’ve cost them nearly $80,000. To put it simply: The editorial section doesn’t have a financial interest in sharing their views. The ad department, however, does. And they basically overstepped their bounds, putting the news and editorial departments in a very tough spot. How can the paper report objectively on the election now that they’ve run a full-page ad supporting the Republican candidate? The editorial page is hidden away  from this kind of influence for a reason. The Seattle Times threw the separation between departments out the window by running this ad. And, as a large metropolitan daily, they deserve the criticism they’re getting. — Ernie @ SFB

16:29 // 1 year ago
October 15, 2012
We have a joke around here. Pretty soon we’re going to have such long commercial breaks that people are going to tune in and all they’ll hear is: ‘Hello, welcome to News 3. And goodbye.’
Lisa Howfield, general manager of local NBC-afficiliate KSNV - Commenting on the increasingly long, and repetitive, commercial breaks that are beginning to wear thin on many television viewers in/around Las Vegas. The city just set a new record for most political ads in a single year, passing the old record of 73,000, with nearly a month to go before Election Day 2012. In total, 98 ads are currently in circulation on Las Vegas television networks, and are being run more than 10,000 times per week. source
15:52 // 1 year ago
October 12, 2012

Snoop Dogg has adapted his hit “Drop It Like It’s Hot” into a Hot Pocket commercial (“Pocket Like It’s Hot”). As the LA Times accurately notes, the original song’s appeal lies with its “braggadocio and attitude: [Snoop’s] got it goin’ on and isn’t afraid to say so.” source

18:58 // 1 year ago
September 9, 2012

Amazon’s Plan B: Pay us to opt out

  • $15 The amount it’ll cost to skip out on ads if you want to buy a Kindle Fire HD. Amazon had a change of heart of the matter. See, guys, not evil!
19:10 // 1 year ago
August 30, 2012
11:48 // 1 year ago
August 27, 2012
21:03 // 1 year ago
August 20, 2012
9:51 // 1 year ago
July 25, 2012

Advertisement of the day

pbump:

If you haven’t seen, this ad for the Paralympics is spectacular.

On a side note, it’s worth noting that friend of SFB and Paralympian Josh Sundquist, who competed as a skiier in 2006, is currently in London covering the Olympics for YouTube. Awesome, right? Follow his exploits here.

17:36 // 2 years ago