The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

February 17, 2014
This is what the diversity breakdown of best director nominees for the Oscars looks like. This year provides a big opportunity for a breakthrough, as Buzzfeed’s Adam B. Vary explains:

At this year’s Academy Awards, Alfonso Cuarón could be the first Latino man to win the Oscar for Best Director (for the sci-fi film Gravity) — and given that he’s won the Directors Guild of America award, he is by far the odds-on favorite to win. If he doesn’t, however, the man who has a strong chance of scoring an upset is12 Years a Slave’s director Steve McQueen — who would be the first black man to win in this category.
And this would be a very big deal: More than perhaps any other people in the world, film directors have had the greatest first-hand influence on how we see ourselves for over a century, as they’ve steered tens of thousands of film productions big and small, driving and defining one of (if not the) most influential representation of our culture for just about 100 years.
But when one looks at the nominees and winners for the Academy Award for Best Director — the best barometer we have for whom the film industry regards as the finest film directors of their respective years — an overwhelming majority of them have been white men.

By the way, that sliver of the pie shown that makes up people who aren’t white and male represents just 17 people.

This is what the diversity breakdown of best director nominees for the Oscars looks like. This year provides a big opportunity for a breakthrough, as Buzzfeed’s Adam B. Vary explains:

At this year’s Academy Awards, Alfonso Cuarón could be the first Latino man to win the Oscar for Best Director (for the sci-fi film Gravity) — and given that he’s won the Directors Guild of America award, he is by far the odds-on favorite to win. If he doesn’t, however, the man who has a strong chance of scoring an upset is12 Years a Slave’s director Steve McQueen — who would be the first black man to win in this category.

And this would be a very big deal: More than perhaps any other people in the world, film directors have had the greatest first-hand influence on how we see ourselves for over a century, as they’ve steered tens of thousands of film productions big and small, driving and defining one of (if not the) most influential representation of our culture for just about 100 years.

But when one looks at the nominees and winners for the Academy Award for Best Director — the best barometer we have for whom the film industry regards as the finest film directors of their respective years — an overwhelming majority of them have been white men.

By the way, that sliver of the pie shown that makes up people who aren’t white and male represents just 17 people.

11:55 // 2 months ago
January 10, 2013

Oscar nominations: Best supporting actor

usatoday:

  • Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln
  • Alan Arkin, Argo
  • Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master
  • Robert De Niro, Silver Linings Playbook

More coverage: http://usat.ly/ZL8rRo

Christoph Waltz + Tarantino = Instant Oscar. Who do you think is gonna get snubbed?

8:46 // 1 year ago
September 3, 2012
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Breaking): Academy Award Nominee Michael Clarke Duncan
Michael Clarke Duncan was a big man, (6’ 5”, 315 pounds) and may have normally been found on the football field. But the Chicago native was forbidden from playing by his mother, so he moved to the stage. After graduating from community college Duncan found himself digging ditches for the local gas company, it was then that he decided to move to Hollywood.
Duncan’s imposing physique and talent earned him a role in the blockbuster asteroid film, Armageddon (1998). The following year, his co-start, Bruce Willis, called Frank Darabont who was directing the film version of Stephen King’s novel, The Green Mile. Willis recommended Duncan for the role of John Coffey the gentle giant who brought magic to Tom Hanks’ death row. For his performance, Duncan was nominated for Best Supporting Actor.
Duncan would be featured in various films and TV series (including Sin City, Talladega Nights, Family Guy, and Chuck). His final two films, In the Hive and The Challenger are not yet released.
In July 2012, Duncan suffered a heart attack. He was unable to recover and died on September 3, 2012. He was only 54.
Sources: Chicago Tribune and IMDB.com
(Image is copyright of PETA and courtesy of ecorazzi.com)

He deserved all the praise he got for “The Green Mile.” It’s sad he died so young.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Breaking): Academy Award Nominee Michael Clarke Duncan

Michael Clarke Duncan was a big man, (6’ 5”, 315 pounds) and may have normally been found on the football field. But the Chicago native was forbidden from playing by his mother, so he moved to the stage. After graduating from community college Duncan found himself digging ditches for the local gas company, it was then that he decided to move to Hollywood.

Duncan’s imposing physique and talent earned him a role in the blockbuster asteroid film, Armageddon (1998). The following year, his co-start, Bruce Willis, called Frank Darabont who was directing the film version of Stephen King’s novel, The Green Mile. Willis recommended Duncan for the role of John Coffey the gentle giant who brought magic to Tom Hanks’ death row. For his performance, Duncan was nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

Duncan would be featured in various films and TV series (including Sin City, Talladega Nights, Family Guy, and Chuck). His final two films, In the Hive and The Challenger are not yet released.

In July 2012, Duncan suffered a heart attack. He was unable to recover and died on September 3, 2012. He was only 54.

Sources: Chicago Tribune and IMDB.com

(Image is copyright of PETA and courtesy of ecorazzi.com)

He deserved all the praise he got for “The Green Mile.” It’s sad he died so young.

19:45 // 1 year ago
February 23, 2012
Will Sacha Baron Cohen try to make an appearance at the Oscars wearing this getup? Not if the Academy has anything to say about it. Cohen, who co-starred in (but was not nominated for) the heavily-acclaimed “Hugo,” has a much-anticipated return to his character-driven films, “The Dictator,” coming out later this year. The Academy hasn’t banned him from the ceremony, as was rumored; however, they claim that he has to show up as himself, not Admiral General Alladeen. To which we say: Show up as Alladeen anyway, Sacha! What are they gonna do, block you from the ceremony and make an even bigger scene than if they simply let you in?

Will Sacha Baron Cohen try to make an appearance at the Oscars wearing this getup? Not if the Academy has anything to say about it. Cohen, who co-starred in (but was not nominated for) the heavily-acclaimed “Hugo,” has a much-anticipated return to his character-driven films, “The Dictator,” coming out later this year. The Academy hasn’t banned him from the ceremony, as was rumored; however, they claim that he has to show up as himself, not Admiral General Alladeen. To which we say: Show up as Alladeen anyway, Sacha! What are they gonna do, block you from the ceremony and make an even bigger scene than if they simply let you in?

11:09 // 2 years ago
November 9, 2011
I appreciate how Eddie feels about losing his creative partner, Brett Ratner, and we all wish him well.
Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences head Tom Sherak • Giving a cordial farewell to Eddie Murphy, who was slated to host the Academy Awards this coming year but decided to drop out following the dismissal of the show’s producer (and Murphy’s friend and collaborator), Brett Ratner. Ratner was removed from his producer role after he used an anti-gay epithet, and subsequently gabbed about his sex life on Howard Stern’s radio show (in other words, he appeared on Howard Stern’s radio show). What the departure of Murphy and Ratner ultimately means is unclear, as no new host or producer has been announced or proposed yet. source (viafollow)
14:44 // 2 years ago