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February 21, 2014
20:25 // 2 months ago
November 21, 2013

Stuff you may have missed: November 21, 2013

Russia won a proxy victory in Ukraine today, after that country decided that it would delay a deal with the European Union and strengthen its ties with Russia, and that jailed opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko (who was jailed on a variety of politically-motivated charges nearly three years ago) would stay in jail.

More evidence that Arcade Fire is U2.0: They requested people dress up for their shows, then had to back off because we’re not good enough.

Hey FCC, we’re OK with the whole iPads-during-takeoff thing, but phones in flight is a landing gate too far. (Speaking of bad landings …)

Want to live longer? Eat nuts, drink coffee, eat tomato sauce, and lighten up a little bit, will ya?

If you’re punching random people for fun, please don’t. Sincerely, everyone else.

19:53 // 5 months ago
April 28, 2012
Did Ms. Tymoshenko sign a bad deal for corrupt reasons in 2009? I’ve no idea. If she were given a genuine trial by an independent court we might find out, but from the charade that convicted her we found out only that there’s nothing worse than politics dressing twitchy officials in robes to masquerade as justice.
National Post columnist George Jonas • Writing about the situation Yulia Tymoshenko, Ukraine’s former Prime Minister, has been facing in jail of late. Tymoshenko went to jail over an energy deal with Russia that went sour for Ukraine, and has been shown in not the best shape of late, currently on a hunger strike, injured from a recent attack by prison guards. Jonas suggests that, with this tale, Ukraine is starting to look like one of the world’s more corrupt nations: ”A country holding its own ex-prime minister for ransom is either a lingering effect of 70 years of communism or a breakthrough in the quest for rock bottom. Perhaps Ukraine is about to open a new chapter in the history of piracy and blackmail.”
10:35 // 1 year ago
April 27, 2012
Ex-Ukrainian Prime Minister struggles in prison: On the left, Yulia Tymoshenko as people knew her from her Orange Revolution days in 2009. On the right, Tymoshenko in prison, days after she says prison guards attacked her when she resisted being taken to a local hospital. The former Ukranian leader, imprisoned soon after leaving office for what many in the West suggest were political reasons, refuses medical treatment for her severe back pain out of worry they’ll just make things worse. A sad look for a once-powerful figure. (AP Photos)

Ex-Ukrainian Prime Minister struggles in prison: On the left, Yulia Tymoshenko as people knew her from her Orange Revolution days in 2009. On the right, Tymoshenko in prison, days after she says prison guards attacked her when she resisted being taken to a local hospital. The former Ukranian leader, imprisoned soon after leaving office for what many in the West suggest were political reasons, refuses medical treatment for her severe back pain out of worry they’ll just make things worse. A sad look for a once-powerful figure. (AP Photos)

13:49 // 1 year ago
October 11, 2011
Yulia Tymoshenko: Former Ukranian PM sentenced to prison
The end of Ukraine’s experiment with democracy? Just a few years ago, Yulia Tymoshenko was one of the most popular politicians in Ukraine. Then she lost power in a narrow 2010 election, and Viktor Yanukovich gained it. Yanukovich pursued Tymoshenko’s role in a set of negotiations with Russia over the price of natural gas — something which, at best, would constitute a political controversy in the U.S., but certainly not something worthy of jail time. But this is Ukraine, and Tymoshenko got sentenced to seven years in prison on Tuesday. Does this signify a move away from traditional democracy for the country? How does a political icon like Tymoshenko (who’s probably far-more-known in the West than Yanukovich) get jailed for what was, at worst, a political scandal? Seems questionable. (photo via the European People’s Party Flickr page) source
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The end of Ukraine’s experiment with democracy? Just a few years ago, Yulia Tymoshenko was one of the most popular politicians in Ukraine. Then she lost power in a narrow 2010 election, and Viktor Yanukovich gained it. Yanukovich pursued Tymoshenko’s role in a set of negotiations with Russia over the price of natural gas — something which, at best, would constitute a political controversy in the U.S., but certainly not something worthy of jail time. But this is Ukraine, and Tymoshenko got sentenced to seven years in prison on Tuesday. Does this signify a move away from traditional democracy for the country? How does a political icon like Tymoshenko (who’s probably far-more-known in the West than Yanukovich) get jailed for what was, at worst, a political scandal? Seems questionable. (photo via the European People’s Party Flickr page) source

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11:07 // 2 years ago