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May 28, 2014
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How Officials Tried to Censor One of the Biggest Stories in the World (via The Atlantic)

When Germany surrendered in World War II, military leaders told reporters to keep it a secret. They might have been successful, too, if not for one rogue journalist.


He lost his job over it, too. What a badass.

digg:

How Officials Tried to Censor One of the Biggest Stories in the World (via The Atlantic)

When Germany surrendered in World War II, military leaders told reporters to keep it a secret. They might have been successful, too, if not for one rogue journalist.

He lost his job over it, too. What a badass.

13:45 // 3 months ago
February 11, 2014

German officials discover more paintings stolen by Nazi-era art dealer

  • 1,406 pieces of art from some of the world’s greatest painters were recovered from the Munich apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, son of Nazi-era art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, after a raid by German police back in 2012. Since recovering the works, authorities have confirmed that 380 of the paintings were confiscated by the Nazis, and that number could increase as investigations of each piece continue.. 
  • 60 more paintings were recovered from Gurlitt’s second home, including works by Picasso, Monet and Renoir, leading to calls for more transparency from the German government as it continues cataloging the hundreds of paintings discovered in the last two years. Officials say a preliminary investigation of the new collection has not revealed any works confirmed stolen by the Nazis, but Gurlitt’s lawyer says his client is willing to discuss returns and/or compensation with those who believe they have a claim to one or more of the paintings. source
15:18 // 7 months ago
January 23, 2013
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Growing Up Black in Nazi Germany”
Hans Massaquoi was very disappointed when his teacher told him that he could not join the Hitler Youth. Massaquoi’s friends had all joined and he was enthralled with the uniforms, the parades, the camp-outs. But Hans’ desire to join was trumped by the color of his skin.
Born in 1926, Mr. Massaquoi’s parents were a German nurse and the son of a Liberian diplomat. He would grow up in Hamburg as the Weimar Republic was collapsing and the the Third Reich was building up.
When he was in second grade, Mr. Massaquoi was so taken with the Nazi imagery that, at his request, his nanny sewed a swastika to his sweater. Although his mother removed it when he returned home from school, a picture had already been taken. (See above.)
Mr. Massaquoi’s family lived in Germany for the duration of the war. According to Mr. Massaquoi’s memoir, Destined to Witness, he theorized that there were so few blacks living in Germany that they were a low priority for extermination. Eventually he would move: first to his father’s home country of Liberia and later to Chicago.
In the United States, although trained in aviation mechanics, Mr. Massaquoi would become a writer for Jet magazine and eventual move to its sister publication, Ebony, where he became managing editor.
Mr. Massaquoi, who passed away on January 19, 2013 on his 87th birthday, was encouraged to write down the story of his unusual childhood by his friend and author of Roots, Alex Haley.
Sources: L.A. Times and Chicago Sun-Times
(Image is from Mr. Massaqoui’s collection and copyright of William Morrow Paperbacks via spiritosanto.wordpress.com)

Fascinating story. Fascinating life. And a photo that sticks with you.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Growing Up Black in Nazi Germany”

Hans Massaquoi was very disappointed when his teacher told him that he could not join the Hitler Youth. Massaquoi’s friends had all joined and he was enthralled with the uniforms, the parades, the camp-outs. But Hans’ desire to join was trumped by the color of his skin.

Born in 1926, Mr. Massaquoi’s parents were a German nurse and the son of a Liberian diplomat. He would grow up in Hamburg as the Weimar Republic was collapsing and the the Third Reich was building up.

When he was in second grade, Mr. Massaquoi was so taken with the Nazi imagery that, at his request, his nanny sewed a swastika to his sweater. Although his mother removed it when he returned home from school, a picture had already been taken. (See above.)

Mr. Massaquoi’s family lived in Germany for the duration of the war. According to Mr. Massaquoi’s memoir, Destined to Witness, he theorized that there were so few blacks living in Germany that they were a low priority for extermination. Eventually he would move: first to his father’s home country of Liberia and later to Chicago.

In the United States, although trained in aviation mechanics, Mr. Massaquoi would become a writer for Jet magazine and eventual move to its sister publication, Ebony, where he became managing editor.

Mr. Massaquoi, who passed away on January 19, 2013 on his 87th birthday, was encouraged to write down the story of his unusual childhood by his friend and author of Roots, Alex Haley.

Sources: L.A. Times and Chicago Sun-Times

(Image is from Mr. Massaqoui’s collection and copyright of William Morrow Paperbacks via spiritosanto.wordpress.com)

Fascinating story. Fascinating life. And a photo that sticks with you.

8:45 // 1 year ago
May 6, 2012

Steve Jobs plays FDR in internal Apple clip from 1984: Today in things even we have a hard time explaining.

11:17 // 2 years ago
March 4, 2012

Video of the day: How the “Keep Calm and Carry On” poster became a cultural phenomenon, over 60 years after it was created as a World War II propaganda poster — but forgotten about, only to be discovered by a second-hand bookstore. Anyone ever been to Barter Books? Sounds like an awesome place.

11:20 // 2 years ago
December 7, 2011

The Washington Post has a great slideshow sampling the various ways newspapers played Pearl Harbor on that fateful day in 1941. Here are two; there are a bunch of others, too. (images via the Newseum collection)

10:49 // 2 years ago
December 4, 2011

German town discovers WWII bombs hiding in Rhine River

  • 45,000 people evacuated over old bombs source

» They were hiding in a river: In one of the weirder discoveries since the end of WWII, record-low water levels in the Western German city of Koblenz exposed old bombs from the latter part of the war — including a 1.8-ton bomb that would be big enough to destroy the city center. It’s a very sensitive situation and one that officials are very careful to handle only without people nearby. “Only when we are sure that all of the 45,000 Germans have left the town (can) the regional bomb-disposal squad start to operate,” said brigade spokesman Ronald Eppelsheim.

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9:30 // 2 years ago
May 12, 2011

John Demjanjuk convicted after lengthy Nazi death camp trial

  • before John Demjanjuk, a 91-year-old retired U.S. autoworker, is reportedly a notorious Nazi death camp prison guard. As a result of this he lost his U.S. citizenship and has been tried on various charges since the 1980s.
  • now After his extradition to Germany in 2009, he was tried in a lengthy trial that ended with his conviction as an accessory to murder at a death camp. He was sentenced to five years in prison. Note that he’s 91.
  • next He was released pending appeal. As Demjanjuk no longer has a country to call his own (he’s literally a citizen of nowhere), he’s pretty much stuck in Germany until the appeals go through. Again, he’s 91. source

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10:03 // 3 years ago