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October 26, 2013

World Health Organization: Polio on the rise in war-torn Syria

  • 22 the number of people—mostly young children—that have contracted polio in Syria, according to the World Health Organization. It’d be the first outbreak in the country in 14 years, and as many as 100,000 children are susceptible to the disease in the highly-contested Deir Ezzor province alone. Due to the poor living conditions, refugees are also susceptible to the disease as well. source
12:42 // 10 months ago
March 27, 2013
19:21 // 1 year ago
August 3, 2012
Should his results come back and he is positive, that causes us a lot of worry. So right now, we have resolved that the remaining prisoners will be cuffed on the beds for fear that they might also escape.
Ugandan Ministry of Health commissioner Dr. Jackson Amune • Discussing the escape of a prisoner who may have a case of the Ebola virus — one of 30 being held out of suspicion of having the virus. Despite the earlier WHO reports this morning that the virus was under control, some reporters in the country dispute this. (thanks Patrick deHahn)
14:30 // 2 years ago
8:40 // 2 years ago
November 14, 2011

Just in case we needed another reminder to exercise once in a while

  • 552 million people could have diabetes by the year 2030 source

» That’s 1 in 10 people worldwide. The World Health Organization says that the rise in diabetic adults will most likely be due to an aging world population, not the increasing rate of obesity. Most cases are Type 2 and come from “weight gain and a sedentary lifestyle.” Count this number as inspiration for 2012’s resolutions.

23:21 // 2 years ago
May 31, 2011
Smokers of the world, quit! Today is “World No Tobacco Day”
Never a bad time: The new, concerning report on cell phone use isn’t the only place you’ll hear the word “carcinogenic” being used today; May 31st is World No Tobacco Day, a cause that could probably benefit from a slightly less clunky title. The World Health Organization estimates that some 6 million people die each year from tobacco-related illness. Anti-smoking measures within the U.S. have blossomed over the last decade, with smoking bans in public places, restaurants, and bars becoming more and more prevalent across the states — check here for a list of smoking bans applicable in your area. source
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Never a bad time: The new, concerning report on cell phone use isn’t the only place you’ll hear the word “carcinogenic” being used today; May 31st is World No Tobacco Day, a cause that could probably benefit from a slightly less clunky title. The World Health Organization estimates that some 6 million people die each year from tobacco-related illness. Anti-smoking measures within the U.S. have blossomed over the last decade, with smoking bans in public places, restaurants, and bars becoming more and more prevalent across the states — check here for a list of smoking bans applicable in your area. source

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17:23 // 3 years ago

More on that WHO/cell phones/cancer thing

oldmanyellsatcloud said: This story sounds…familiar. Quick google foo brought up this old transcript. transcripts.cnn.com/TRA… Weird. Any link to the actual WHO study? only found this: who.int/mediace…

» SFB says: This is new. Engadget has a press release if you’re curious. The International Agency for Research on Cancer, a WHO-affiliated group, made the specific report. If anything else, this certainly makes things more interesting.

14:27 // 3 years ago
Yeah, that’s scary: WHO calls cell phones “carcinogenic hazard”
The World Health Organization has a new study out that says cell phones are possibly carcinogenic to humans — they’re in the same class as lead, engine exhaust and chloroform. They based their findings on a number of peer-reviewed studies on cell-phone safety. Long-term effects from cell phone radiation remain unknown, but research suggests that cell phone radiation is non-ionizing — similar to a very low-powered microwave. “What microwave radiation does in most simplistic terms is similar to what happens to food in microwaves, essentially cooking the brain,” notes Dr. Keith Black, who leads the neurology department at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He notes that beyond brain cancer, this could also cause memory problems because we hold cell phones close to the memory temporal lobes. Looks like it’s time to break out the earbuds. (photo via ElvertBarnes' Flickr page) source
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The World Health Organization has a new study out that says cell phones are possibly carcinogenic to humans — they’re in the same class as lead, engine exhaust and chloroform. They based their findings on a number of peer-reviewed studies on cell-phone safety. Long-term effects from cell phone radiation remain unknown, but research suggests that cell phone radiation is non-ionizing — similar to a very low-powered microwave. “What microwave radiation does in most simplistic terms is similar to what happens to food in microwaves, essentially cooking the brain,” notes Dr. Keith Black, who leads the neurology department at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He notes that beyond brain cancer, this could also cause memory problems because we hold cell phones close to the memory temporal lobes. Looks like it’s time to break out the earbuds. (photo via ElvertBarnes' Flickr page) source

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13:55 // 3 years ago
April 14, 2011

Stillborn babies: Very high rates worldwide, and even in the U.S.

  • 2.6M number of stillborn babies worldwide in 2009, according to reports published by The Lancet
  • 98% of the babies stillborn each day — roughly 7,200 — die in developing countries, some at alarming rates
  • six number of stillborn babies per 1,000 born in the United States — very high for a developed country source

» Controversial numbers: The numbers in the developing world are questionable simply because, being the developing world, they’re much harder to quantify. But that doesn’t make the numbers any less shocking. According to the World Health Organization’s estimates, these countries have two-thirds of the stillborn deaths worldwide: India, Pakistan, Nigeria, China, Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Afghanistan and the United Republic of Tanzania. Yeah, that’s right. That’s only ten countries.

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10:44 // 3 years ago
November 25, 2010

WHO: Second-hand smoke kills hundreds of thousands each year

  • 600,000 the number of people worldwide who die each year as a result of second-hand smoking (cough, cough)
  • 165,000 the number of children killed each year by second-hand smoke; they’re most heavily exposed to it source
22:20 // 3 years ago