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February 8, 2014
aljazeeraamerica:

Former US analyst pleads guilty in leak to reporter

A former U.S. State Department analyst pleaded guilty Friday to sharing secret information about North Korea with a reporter for Fox News, becoming the latest government employee convicted in a campaign against unapproved leaks to the media.
The case is one of 11 times in U.S. history that prosecutors have brought charges for disclosing information to a newspaper, blog or other media outlet. Eight cases have been brought since President Barack Obama took office in 2009.
Stephen Kim, 46, entered the plea in U.S. District Court to avoid a trial scheduled for April.

Read more
Photo: Greg Mathieson/Mai/Getty Images

When federal employees are going to jail for leaks to the media, something’s wrong. Especially considering nearly all of these cases have been brought by the Obama administration.

aljazeeraamerica:

Former US analyst pleads guilty in leak to reporter

A former U.S. State Department analyst pleaded guilty Friday to sharing secret information about North Korea with a reporter for Fox News, becoming the latest government employee convicted in a campaign against unapproved leaks to the media.

The case is one of 11 times in U.S. history that prosecutors have brought charges for disclosing information to a newspaper, blog or other media outlet. Eight cases have been brought since President Barack Obama took office in 2009.

Stephen Kim, 46, entered the plea in U.S. District Court to avoid a trial scheduled for April.

Read more

Photo: Greg Mathieson/Mai/Getty Images

When federal employees are going to jail for leaks to the media, something’s wrong. Especially considering nearly all of these cases have been brought by the Obama administration.

15:35 // 7 months ago
August 20, 2013
15:17 // 1 year ago
August 19, 2013
He betrayed the United States. For that betrayal he deserves to spend the majority of his remaining life in prison.
Captain Joe Morrow • During his closing statements, on behalf of the prosecution in the trial of Pfc. Bradley Manning, which also included a call for the presiding judge Colonel Denise Lind to send Manning to jail for at least 60 years. Col. Lind has already ruled out the possibility of any sentence longer than 90 years, despite the fact that the accumulated charges against Pfc. Manning technically qualify him for up to 136 years behind bars, but has given no other indicator of what to expect from the sentence when it arrivess either this week or next. source
19:21 // 1 year ago
August 6, 2013

Judge cuts more than four decades off longest possible sentence for Pfc. Bradley Manning

  • 136 years in prison was originally believed to be the maximum sentence faced by Pfc. Bradley Manning, the soldier found guilty of a variety of crimes (though not aiding the enemy) when he leaked hundreds of thousands of documents to the WikiLeaks organization back in 2010.
  • 90 years in prison will be the maximum sentence faced by Pfc. Manning, following Judge Colonel Denise Lind’s decision to merge several of the soldier’s espionage charges as a precaution against any “unreasonable multiplication of charges.” Prosecutors sought to have each count of espionage counted as a separate offense during the sentencing phase of Pfc. Manning’s trial. source
17:54 // 1 year ago
July 29, 2013
14:31 // 1 year ago
July 25, 2013
He delivered hundreds of thousands of documents ready-to-use to WikiLeaks, he delivered them for notoriety … He searched for as much information as he knew would guarantee his fame, information that he knew that WikiLeaks wanted to publicly release.
Maj. Ashden Fein • Commenting on the U.S. government’s perception of the motivating factor behind Pfc. Bradley Manning’s decision to leak hundreds of thousands of documents to the whistle-blowing organization founded by Julian Assange. Manning faces a total of 21 charges that could land him life plus 154 years imprisonment in a military-run correctional facility. Closing arguments in Manning’s case were delivered on Thursday, and the ruling of Judge Colonel Denise Lind is expected sometime in the next few days. source
17:55 // 1 year ago
July 1, 2013
For decades the United States of America has been one of the strongest defenders of the human right to seek asylum. Sadly, this right, laid out and voted for by the U.S. in Article 14 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, is now being rejected by the current government of my country. The Obama administration has now adopted the strategy of using citizenship as a weapon. Although I am convicted of nothing, it has unilaterally revoked my passport, leaving me a stateless person. Without any judicial order, the administration now seeks to stop me exercising a basic right. A right that belongs to everybody. The right to seek asylum.
Edward Snowden, calling out the Obama administration for trying to block his asylum. Oh, and he made his statement through Wikileaks.
19:05 // 1 year ago
June 17, 2013
Being called a traitor by Dick Cheney is the highest honor you can give an American, and the more panicked talk we hear from people like him, Feinstein, and King, the better off we all are.
Edward Snowden • Offering his thoughts on the opinions of politicians like former Vice President Dick Cheney and Speaker Boehner who have criticized the man responsible for leaking information on the National Security Agency’s classified PRISM program. Snowden made the comments during a Q&A session moderated by The Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald on Monday, and also discussed a myriad of other issues surrounding his decision to leak the PRISM information, including claims that he might be a Chinese spy. source
16:10 // 1 year ago
June 16, 2013
Seriously, if you’re rabidly eating up the Lindsay Mills news but haven’t a clue why China hates us when consequences of this leak start getting real, I will have no pity for you, nor will I explain. You should have listened up when you had the chance.
Digital Trends writer Molly McHugh • Offering a scathing, but spot-on, critique of the attention Edward Snowden’s girlfriend has received in the week since the news of Snowden’s identity became public. As McHugh points out, both Snowden himself and Mills, a dancer who has many photos of herself floating around the internet, have become more popular search terms on Google Trends than PRISM has. “And I get it: When something really complicated and important happens, a lot of people cling to the most personally identifiable thing that has to do with it,” McHugh writes. “This one happens to be a pretty girl who got broken up with (sort of) and gave us plenty of photo insight into her life.” But that we have a national security version of the “Manic Pixie Dream Girl" still doesn’t mean we should skip over the actual issue at hand here, McHugh explains.
17:36 // 1 year ago
June 13, 2013
We have a real double standard. A few weeks ago we were all complaining that we didn’t have enough information about those kids in Boston and we needed broader intelligence sharing. Now we say we want to clamp down on how the information moves.
Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) • Speaking after an off-record briefing, attended by roughly half of the Senate’s members, about the NSA’s surveillance programs. Despite McCain’s skeptical take on the matter, momentum seems to be growing in favor of more limitations on information-sharing, with one key defender of the NSA programs, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), claiming that legislation was on its way. “We will certainly have legislation which will limit or prevent contractors from handling highly classified and technical data, and we will do some other things,” she said.
21:46 // 1 year ago