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February 24, 2014
vicemag:

A quick tip for your elevator ride up to the office: grab a piping hot cuppa joe at the corner store and stick an egg in it to make a hard boiled morning snack.

Oh, so it’s normal to put your finger in “a piping hot cuppa joe?” Let me tell you, VICE Magazine, I don’t think so. 

vicemag:

A quick tip for your elevator ride up to the office: grab a piping hot cuppa joe at the corner store and stick an egg in it to make a hard boiled morning snack.

Oh, so it’s normal to put your finger in “a piping hot cuppa joe?” Let me tell you, VICE Magazine, I don’t think so. 

9:30 // 5 months ago
February 23, 2014
15:15 // 5 months ago
November 9, 2013

In case you were curious, researchers are working on a urine-based power source for robots. Here’s a video of a mobile phone getting charged this way.

16:16 // 9 months ago
October 21, 2013
13:30 // 10 months ago
April 8, 2013

jtotheizzoe:

The Digestion Song

If you’re looking for the definitive video explaining the science of the digestive system, here it is. 

Or something?

I kinda feel like I’m on drugs while watching this.

(via velutican618 on YouTube)

Still digesting the insanity of this clip.

22:37 // 1 year ago
January 23, 2013

This rendition of “Losing My Religion” seems a lot more optimistic than usual, as if there was a major key change. (ht Gawker)

10:18 // 1 year ago
January 15, 2013

hypervocal:

If you joyride a train, you’ll prob crash into a house

A derailed train on Tuesday crashed into the side of a house in Saltsjöbaden, a town of about 10,000 outside Stockholm. A woman, reportedly a twenty-something cleaner for the train company, somehow snagged the keys to the train and drove it away before it crashed into the building. (Lisbeth Salander, is that you?) The cleaner was injured in the incident, but amazingly, there are no reports of injuries of people in the residence.

Reblogging because I’ve done this before.

9:07 // 1 year ago
January 8, 2013
15:00 // 1 year ago
November 2, 2012
dailydot:

Unraveling Markovian Parallax Denigrate, the Internet’s oldest and weirdest mystery 
Spam. It’s the Internet’s most resilient parasite. Millions of messages pollute the Web’s pipes every day. Grow a monster penis. Lose 20 pounds. Help out an African prince. You know the drill.
A lot of it is garbled junk, sentences that read like a computer ingested the Oxford English Dictionary and vomited it back out. The results are bizarre and often unintentionally hilarious, a favorite subject of forwarded emails or, in the age of Twitter, cult celebrity. Spam account @horse_ebooks boasts 120,000 thousand followers thanks entirely to the accidental and absurdist poetry of its tweets.
But back in 1996, users of the proto-Web community Usenet got spammed with messages that reached an almost transcendent level of bizarre—a weirdness so precise it implied the influence of a very human intelligence. [more]

I read this piece all the way through, and it really reminded me of this magazine that no longer exists, but was a cover-to-cover read for me in the late ’90s: Internet Underground Magazine. It had some awesome design for the era, covered edgy topics, and even inspired some notable early memes. It was a great magazine because it seemed much more invested in the culture of the internet than its much-more-heralded competitor, Wired, did. But it closed in 1997, the victim of low ad sales and a change in ownership. It’s too bad. Like Suck.com, they missed out on the good part.
It just hit me that The Daily Dot is the modern equivalent of this magazine, which just made my respect for them go way up.

dailydot:

Unraveling Markovian Parallax Denigrate, the Internet’s oldest and weirdest mystery

Spam. It’s the Internet’s most resilient parasite. Millions of messages pollute the Web’s pipes every day. Grow a monster penis. Lose 20 pounds. Help out an African prince. You know the drill.

A lot of it is garbled junk, sentences that read like a computer ingested the Oxford English Dictionary and vomited it back out. The results are bizarre and often unintentionally hilarious, a favorite subject of forwarded emails or, in the age of Twitter, cult celebrity. Spam account @horse_ebooks boasts 120,000 thousand followers thanks entirely to the accidental and absurdist poetry of its tweets.

But back in 1996, users of the proto-Web community Usenet got spammed with messages that reached an almost transcendent level of bizarre—a weirdness so precise it implied the influence of a very human intelligence. [more]

I read this piece all the way through, and it really reminded me of this magazine that no longer exists, but was a cover-to-cover read for me in the late ’90s: Internet Underground Magazine. It had some awesome design for the era, covered edgy topics, and even inspired some notable early memes. It was a great magazine because it seemed much more invested in the culture of the internet than its much-more-heralded competitor, Wired, did. But it closed in 1997, the victim of low ad sales and a change in ownership. It’s too bad. Like Suck.com, they missed out on the good part.

It just hit me that The Daily Dot is the modern equivalent of this magazine, which just made my respect for them go way up.

19:05 // 1 year ago
September 14, 2012
huffingtonpost:

Raw weblog data gets organized into summarized, usable database tables via a couple of data processing steps. Sometimes intermediate tables are used to help calculate sums, groups, and values at the level we are interested in. For example, variables recorded at very granular time intervals might later be summed or averaged in longer groups of time. Storing what happened in the past hour or day is intuitive, whereas its hard to think of when you would need to know the exact millisecond a user clicked on something. You end up with tables that have a structure closer to what you might remember from the datasets you saw in the Intro to Stats class you aced, and these can be regularly used by developers or analysts without much hassle/manipulation.
Sideboob Exposed: Raw, Summary, and Usable Web Data aka: Why we have a whole page dedicated to this phenomenon. 

This is the most fascinating article in HuffPo history …

… and it appears to all be for the purpose of an elaborate sideboob graph.

huffingtonpost:

Raw weblog data gets organized into summarized, usable database tables via a couple of data processing steps. Sometimes intermediate tables are used to help calculate sums, groups, and values at the level we are interested in. For example, variables recorded at very granular time intervals might later be summed or averaged in longer groups of time. Storing what happened in the past hour or day is intuitive, whereas its hard to think of when you would need to know the exact millisecond a user clicked on something. You end up with tables that have a structure closer to what you might remember from the datasets you saw in the Intro to Stats class you aced, and these can be regularly used by developers or analysts without much hassle/manipulation.

Sideboob Exposed: Raw, Summary, and Usable Web Data aka: Why we have a whole page dedicated to this phenomenon. 

This is the most fascinating article in HuffPo history …

… and it appears to all be for the purpose of an elaborate sideboob graph.

22:57 // 1 year ago