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December 6, 2012
washingtonpoststyle:

It’s our 135th birthday. Here’s the first edition of The Washington Post from December 6, 1877.

That’s exactly what it looked like then, too, down to the photocopying.

washingtonpoststyle:

It’s our 135th birthday. Here’s the first edition of The Washington Post from December 6, 1877.

That’s exactly what it looked like then, too, down to the photocopying.

12:35 // 1 year ago
September 14, 2012
As much as I have enjoyed my prestige among religious conservatives, I fear it will be short-lived. This is because I plan to use my newfound bona fides to criticize Perkins and the Family Research Council.
Liberal-leaning Washington Post columnist Dana Milbank • Responding to surprisingly positive comments made about him by the Family Research Council’s Tony Perkins. While noting that he stands behind a prior column where he criticized liberal organizations that called the FRC a “hate group,” he points out that Perkins missed part of his argument. “I also argued that Perkins should cease the false propaganda his group has put out about gay people,” he says. “Perkins hasn’t followed that advice.”
11:00 // 1 year ago
July 13, 2012
One year ago, journalist Jose Antonio Vargas revealed to the world that he was an undocumented immigrant — building his entire career, which included time at The Washington Post and The Huffington Post, on a lie. Vargas looks back at the past year in an interview with BuzzFeed, where he considers the weirdness of becoming an activist, his friends lost (many in the news industry), and his friends gained (Mark Zuckerberg, Aaron Sorkin). Great piece.

One year ago, journalist Jose Antonio Vargas revealed to the world that he was an undocumented immigrant — building his entire career, which included time at The Washington Post and The Huffington Post, on a lie. Vargas looks back at the past year in an interview with BuzzFeed, where he considers the weirdness of becoming an activist, his friends lost (many in the news industry), and his friends gained (Mark Zuckerberg, Aaron Sorkin). Great piece.

9:02 // 1 year ago
June 5, 2012
The Washington Post’s Jon Cohen notes that exit polls show the split between conservatives and liberals is roughly the same in Wisconsin between the 2010 election and tonight. (click for more)

The Washington Post’s Jon Cohen notes that exit polls show the split between conservatives and liberals is roughly the same in Wisconsin between the 2010 election and tonight. (click for more)

21:29 // 1 year ago
May 27, 2012

States don’t want to raise taxes, so they’re collecting twice as hard

  • problem States like Vermont, Idaho and Oklahoma are trying desperately not to raise taxes on their economy-torn residents. “You don’t want to raise taxes until you’re very sure the taxes that people are supposed to pay are being paid,” said Rep. Janet Ancel, chairwoman of Vermont’s House Ways and Means Committee.
  • solution They may not be willing to raise taxes, but they’re totally willing to go after residents who aren’t paying back taxes! “It certainly is your responsibility when you have a business to be keeping up on the rules,” said Vermont State Tax Commissioner Mary Peterson. Question: Would you rather see tax increases than this? source

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15:41 // 1 year ago
May 2, 2012

Yesterday, The Washington Post was the first news outlet to confirm and talk to blind, house-arrest-escaping Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng after his escape — in a short cell phone call with U.S. ambassador Gary Locke. Here's how it went down: 

“Hello, this is Chen Guangcheng,” came a matter-of-fact, almost cheerful voice.

I introduced myself in halting Chinese, using my Chinese name and the Chinese name for The Washington Post. I asked how Chen was, and where. I asked him to speak slowly, to make sure I could understand.

“Washington Post?” Chen repeated, his voice sounding generally happy.  Chen said he was fine and was in the car headed to the hospital, Chaoyang Hospital.  He repeated the name slowly, three times. 

And that was it. Chen handed the phone back to the ambassador, who said they were stuck in traffic, but promised a full briefing later.

The Post had a prior relationship with Chen Guangcheng, as they wrote an article on the dissident in 2005.

10:42 // 1 year ago
April 30, 2012

Big tech rumor of the night: The Washington Post Company is going to acquire Digg's staff, but not its assets. 

While not confirmed by the Post, which has no comment, The Next Web has multiple sources telling them about the news, with TechCrunch reporting from a source or two of its own. If this was the case, it’d likely dovetail nicely into the Post’s recent push into social readers. Whatever happens, it probably won’t be as exciting as the company’s 2008 near-acquisition by Google, which fell through during the due diligence process but had a rumored valuation as high as $200 million. The company, long-associated with its TV host founder Kevin Rose, had a high-profile failure in 2010 when many of the site’s users left for Reddit after scorning a major redesign. (Disclosure: I work for the Washington Post Company, but not at the Post proper; I’d have no idea if this was actually happening. — Ernie @ SFB)

22:17 // 1 year ago
April 23, 2012

A column by Washington Post ombudsman Patrick Pexton, which suggested the structure of the paper failed a blogger accused of plagiarism, was roundly criticized by a top executive Monday. 

Katharine Zaleski, the Post’s executive director of digital news, told me today that Pexton’s description of an online operation focused on churning out content is inaccurate.

“We have incredibly high standards to the point where this idea [of Pexton’s] that we’re pumping things out is ridiculous when you compare us to some of the other news organizations that have people publish immediately [without editing],” she said.

Zaleski said BlogPost has copy editors that read over posts prior to publication, and work with writers. (She would not speak about Flock, citing Post policy to not comment on personnel matters.)

The blogger in question, Elizabeth Flock, left the paper last week after an article of hers was singled out by in an editor’s note for a “significant ethical lapse.” While some saw Pexton’s column as shining light on the pressure aggregators face (we offered a brief take here), others felt that Pexton was being sympathetic to someone who plagiarized. Zaleski also took issue with Pexton’s presentation of the issue as one of neglected younger employees, whose grievances he cited anonymously: “I have no idea what he’s talking about. I don’t know who he’s talking about. I’m young, so what does that mean?”

(Disclosure: I work for the Washington Post Company, but not at the Post proper. — Ernie @ SFB)

16:25 // 2 years ago
April 22, 2012
They said that they felt as if they were out there alone in digital land, under high pressure to get Web hits, with no training, little guidance or mentoring and sparse editing. Guidelines for aggregating stories are almost nonexistent, they said. And they believe that, even if they do a good job, there is no path forward. Will they one day graduate to a beat, covering a crime scene, a city council or a school board? They didn’t know. So some left; others are thinking of quitting.
The Post fails a young blogger (via frontofbook)

With some disclosure (I work for the Washington Post Company, but not at the Post proper) I’ll say that this whole situation is a real heartbreaker. My hope is that the Post can figure out a way to balance the need for fast-paced aggregation with its high journalistic standards. Worth reading is Ombudsman Patrick Pexton’s previous article on the subject. (He wrote this piece, too.) I don’t agree with every point he makes here, but I think that he’s pointed out an important issue — how high pressure, as is common with blogging trending news stories, puts bloggers at a disadvantage. — Ernie @ SFB

(via markcoatney)

10:25 // 2 years ago
April 20, 2012

Ezra Klein would like you to know that if you obsess over nontroversies – whether Etch A Sketches or dog meat – you're not normal. 

I think most people in Washington believe voters would make better decisions if they spent more time following politics. But I spend a lot of time following politics, and quite often, I couldn’t be happier that voters are tuning out the inanities that obsess this town. Better that they worry about real mountains rather than hyped-up molehills.

The Washington Post columnist has it right. Sure, these stories are fun, but they’re distractions that conveniently fill air during dead periods of the news cycle.

20:03 // 2 years ago