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October 1, 2011

thepoliticalnotebook:

Watch the #OccupyWallStreet protests on the Brooklyn Bridge live. According to Evan Fleischer, the arrest count is 24 and probably going to increase.

Follow tweeters like Evan Fleischer (who also is curating on Tumblr), Ryan Devereaux, Allison Kilkenny, Brian Stelter, and Adbusters.

The protests are fascinating because of the focus on naming the people getting arrested. “WHAT’S YOUR NAME!?!?” All of these protesters know they’re on camera. All of these protesters know that keeping information as open as possible is the best possible thing they can do for their cause. A child just got arrested, BTW.

17:15 // 2 years ago
September 27, 2011
Spotted at Occupy Wall Street today: Susan Sarandon. No word on when Barry Bostwick will show up. Does that mean NPR will finally cover this? (EDIT: Yes, they will.)

Spotted at Occupy Wall Street today: Susan Sarandon. No word on when Barry Bostwick will show up. Does that mean NPR will finally cover this? (EDIT: Yes, they will.)

17:21 // 2 years ago
jayrosen:

Why NPR won’t give air time to the Occupy Wall Street protests in lower Manhattan.
No crowds, celebrities, mayhem or clear demands? No coverage. 
From the NPR ombudsman’s blog: 

NPR hasn’t aired a story on the “Occupy Wall Street” protest — now entering its second week — but several of you aired your concerns about the lack of coverage, and Ralph Nader called to say NPR is ignoring the left.. We asked the newsroom to explain their editorial decision. Executive editor for news Dick Meyer came back: “The recent protests on Wall Street did not involve large numbers of people, prominent people, a great disruption or an especially clear objective.”

Here we have an answer about priorities at NPR that people can argue with. That’s good. That’s transparency.
Prominent people, huh? As opposed to young people giving up their lives to sleep outside in rain, filth and noise and perhaps get maced to make a political statement about accountability on Wall Street…
Disruption? And that differs from an invitation to mayhem how… exactly?
Dick Meyer’s statement should be a widget. Meaning: NPR should keep a rolling list of candidate-for-coverage stories that it is not covering with an explanation for why it is not covering them, and then place it around npr.org as a sidebar. 

We made a point about this yesterday, that Occupy Wall Street doesn’t have a “hook” at the moment that easily sells its appeal to a larger audience. But there’s a difference between not having a “hook” and ignoring it entirely. We like the transparency, too, but we think NPR’s missing the boat.

jayrosen:

Why NPR won’t give air time to the Occupy Wall Street protests in lower Manhattan.

No crowds, celebrities, mayhem or clear demands? No coverage. 

From the NPR ombudsman’s blog: 

NPR hasn’t aired a story on the “Occupy Wall Street” protest — now entering its second week — but several of you aired your concerns about the lack of coverage, and Ralph Nader called to say NPR is ignoring the left.. We asked the newsroom to explain their editorial decision. Executive editor for news Dick Meyer came back: “The recent protests on Wall Street did not involve large numbers of people, prominent people, a great disruption or an especially clear objective.”

Here we have an answer about priorities at NPR that people can argue with. That’s good. That’s transparency.

Prominent people, huh? As opposed to young people giving up their lives to sleep outside in rain, filth and noise and perhaps get maced to make a political statement about accountability on Wall Street…

Disruption? And that differs from an invitation to mayhem how… exactly?

Dick Meyer’s statement should be a widget. Meaning: NPR should keep a rolling list of candidate-for-coverage stories that it is not covering with an explanation for why it is not covering them, and then place it around npr.org as a sidebar. 

We made a point about this yesterday, that Occupy Wall Street doesn’t have a “hook” at the moment that easily sells its appeal to a larger audience. But there’s a difference between not having a “hook” and ignoring it entirely. We like the transparency, too, but we think NPR’s missing the boat.

(via firthofforth)

11:00 // 2 years ago
September 26, 2011

holden421 says: You recently just replied to someones asking if you think the Wall Street protests are important enough to pay attention to. Your answer was "If more moments like this weekend’s macing take place, you can expect people to start taking them seriously." So my question to you is do you think the wall street protests should only be paid attention to when there is some amount of violence or civil unrest? Shouldn't these protests be getting full coverage by the media despite violence or unrest?

» SFB says: The problem with the protests right now is that they need a spark or a hook, something for an outsider to say, holy crap, I need to focus on this. You don’t have a rally-around-the-flag moment without a reason. It doesn’t have to be violence or over-the-top anger, but it has to be something that brings people together. For example, the Tea Party had a speech by Rick Santelli which was talked about on TV for a week. This movement doesn’t have anything like that. It doesn’t have a leader. It’s decentralized. This can be good, but it needs a spark. — Ernie @ SFB

15:55 // 2 years ago
14:25 // 2 years ago
September 25, 2011

Occupy Wall Street: How often does the NYPD pull out the pepper spray?

Not very often at all, according to the New York Times. In the weekend’s most unbelievable video, a number of young women were pepper sprayed after reacting towards another man’s arrest, seemingly arbitrarily. “A cop in a white shirt — I think he’s a superior officer — just comes along and does these quick little spritzes of pepper spray in my and these three other girls’ eyes,” said Chelsea Elliott, one of the four women sprayed. It’s not a common occurrence for the NYPD to use it. While it got used during a 2003 antiwar protest, it didn’t get used in a much-larger 2004 protest that accompanied the Republican National Convention. “We don’t use it indiscriminately like other cities do,” notes former deputy chief Thomas Graham. So why was it needed for this protest? source

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23:37 // 2 years ago

Occupy Wall Street: Yes, the media is covering it.

beautyofapple says: And still we hear nothing on main stream media. (Edit: After this post, they corrected.)

» SFB says: Here are 900 news articles from the past 24 hours, from news sources as diverse and mainstream as The New York Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post and ABC News. Enjoy. (Note: This is not to say the media isn’t underplaying it, but let’s get our facts straight, friends.) — Ernie @ SFB

(Source: danpatterson, via loveofapple-deactivated20111025)

17:56 // 2 years ago
danpatterson:

Lots of media - guys w expensive cameras and women in suits with notebooks - at #occupywallstreet  (Taken with instagram)

Reblogging with emphasis.

danpatterson:

Lots of media - guys w expensive cameras and women in suits with notebooks - at #occupywallstreet (Taken with instagram)

Reblogging with emphasis.

17:22 // 2 years ago
September 24, 2011
23:57 // 2 years ago

In this short clip, a protester says something to a police officer. Less than two seconds later, he’s on the ground. Again. WTF? (Side note: The NY Post’s headline for this mess? “March Madness.”)

23:37 // 2 years ago