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January 6, 2013
sunfoundation:

A visual comparison of every jumbotron in the NFL

Cowboys Stadium currently boasts the largest jumbotron in the NFL — a behemoth of an LED measuring 160 feet wide and 72 feet tall — but how does Dallas’ Texas-sized display compare to the rest of the NFL’s set ups? That’s the question that graphic designer Daniel Beaton set out to answer with a straightforward infographic.


The Vikings’ jumbotron is basically a 27-inch TV.

sunfoundation:

A visual comparison of every jumbotron in the NFL

Cowboys Stadium currently boasts the largest jumbotron in the NFL — a behemoth of an LED measuring 160 feet wide and 72 feet tall — but how does Dallas’ Texas-sized display compare to the rest of the NFL’s set ups? That’s the question that graphic designer Daniel Beaton set out to answer with a straightforward infographic.

The Vikings’ jumbotron is basically a 27-inch TV.

19:47 // 1 year ago
August 1, 2012
12:54 // 1 year ago
June 8, 2012
sunfoundation:

Poll: Majority oppose New York City soda ban

It appears a majority of Americans aren’t too sweet on New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s proposed soda ban.


Key line: “About seven in 10, or 71 percent, say they don’t believe that limiting soda cup sizes will actually have an impact on obesity rates.” For comparison’s sake, would like to see a formal poll on the Disney thing. This non-scientific poll is mostly in favor of Disney’s ad policy changes.

sunfoundation:

Poll: Majority oppose New York City soda ban

It appears a majority of Americans aren’t too sweet on New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s proposed soda ban.

Key line: “About seven in 10, or 71 percent, say they don’t believe that limiting soda cup sizes will actually have an impact on obesity rates.” For comparison’s sake, would like to see a formal poll on the Disney thing. This non-scientific poll is mostly in favor of Disney’s ad policy changes.

23:26 // 2 years ago
May 24, 2012

kylewpppd:

transitmaps:

How the WMATA Rush+ Maps Are Printed

Many thanks to Matt Johnson for telling me about this amazing photoset on Flickr that details the process involved in printing the new Rush+ station maps for Washington, DC’s Metro system. Click through to see the whole set!

Even as an experienced graphic designer, I was amazed to see that the maps are screen printed - each colour on the map is printed one after the other, each using a separate screen with its own spot colour ink. With a map as complex as this, that means that there are a whopping twelve different colours to print! These being: river blue, park green, National Mall green, Blue Line, Orange Line, Yellow Line, Green Line, Red Line, Silver Line, District/County border grey, Beltway grey, and finally, black.

I would have thought with the advances in digital printing and stochastic (micro) screening, that these could be produced digitally in one step instead of twelve, but maybe these are special long-lasting UV inks that will withstand many years of use without fading - an important consideration for station maps! In any case, these photos are a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at a process that many people may not even think about.

EDIT: A tweet from a Metro representative confirms that there are THIRTEEN colours used in the printing: 4 greys (Silver Line, Beltway grey, county border grey, and icon grey), 3 greens (parks, Mall, Green Line), 2 Blues (river, Blue Line), Black, Red, Yellow and Orange.

OH MY GOD! I <3 <3 <3 this more than that time I met Bieber.

Dear fans of DC Metro maps: Here’s how they make them. Wow. Awesome.

(via sunfoundation)

16:56 // 2 years ago
May 20, 2012
futurejournalismproject:

Made in New York City
A map of NYC start-ups, incubators and investors. Also includes information about companies that are hiring if you’re in the market.

Why just NYC? We&#8217;d like to see a similar map of startups around the country. Who knows, we might just surface a latent hotbed in the Rust Belt.

futurejournalismproject:

Made in New York City

A map of NYC start-ups, incubators and investors. Also includes information about companies that are hiring if you’re in the market.

Why just NYC? We’d like to see a similar map of startups around the country. Who knows, we might just surface a latent hotbed in the Rust Belt.

11:42 // 2 years ago
March 27, 2012
futurejournalismproject:

Of Total Income Increase in 2010…
Steven Rattner, a Wall Street executive and New York Times Op-Ed contributor, writes:

In 2010, as the nation continued to recover from the recession, a dizzying 93 percent of the additional income created in the country that year, compared to 2009 — $288 billion — went to the top 1 percent of taxpayers, those with at least $352,000 in income. That delivered an average single-year pay increase of 11.6 percent to each of these households.
Still more astonishing was the extent to which the super rich got rich faster than the merely rich. In 2010, 37 percent of these additional earnings went to just the top 0.01 percent, a teaspoon-size collection of about 15,000 households with average incomes of $23.8 million. These fortunate few saw their incomes rise by 21.5 percent.
The bottom 99 percent received a microscopic $80 increase in pay per person in 2010, after adjusting for inflation. The top 1 percent, whose average income is $1,019,089, had an 11.6 percent increase in income.

Steven Rattner, The New York Times. The Rich Get Even Richer.

Yikes. The balance is off.

futurejournalismproject:

Of Total Income Increase in 2010…

Steven Rattner, a Wall Street executive and New York Times Op-Ed contributor, writes:

In 2010, as the nation continued to recover from the recession, a dizzying 93 percent of the additional income created in the country that year, compared to 2009 — $288 billion — went to the top 1 percent of taxpayers, those with at least $352,000 in income. That delivered an average single-year pay increase of 11.6 percent to each of these households.

Still more astonishing was the extent to which the super rich got rich faster than the merely rich. In 2010, 37 percent of these additional earnings went to just the top 0.01 percent, a teaspoon-size collection of about 15,000 households with average incomes of $23.8 million. These fortunate few saw their incomes rise by 21.5 percent.

The bottom 99 percent received a microscopic $80 increase in pay per person in 2010, after adjusting for inflation. The top 1 percent, whose average income is $1,019,089, had an 11.6 percent increase in income.

Steven Rattner, The New York Times. The Rich Get Even Richer.

Yikes. The balance is off.

12:34 // 2 years ago
March 25, 2012
sunfoundation:

The Evolution of Storage

If you haven’t already seen this Evolution of Storage infographic, take a look. It’s beautiful and fun, and it has me thinking about the way we live.


The graphic falls apart on the right side, as the graphs stop following the key, but the infographic is pretty fascinating nonetheless.

sunfoundation:

The Evolution of Storage

If you haven’t already seen this Evolution of Storage infographic, take a look. It’s beautiful and fun, and it has me thinking about the way we live.

The graphic falls apart on the right side, as the graphs stop following the key, but the infographic is pretty fascinating nonetheless.

10:53 // 2 years ago
October 24, 2011
sunfoundation:

Simple Tumblr Stats

This tool tells you about your tumblr style using charts and graphs.


Pretty cool. This is gonna take us a while to do … we have over 8,000 posts. Kinda curious as to what it&#8217;s going to say.

sunfoundation:

Simple Tumblr Stats

This tool tells you about your tumblr style using charts and graphs.

Pretty cool. This is gonna take us a while to do … we have over 8,000 posts. Kinda curious as to what it’s going to say.

19:54 // 2 years ago
September 18, 2011
18:46 // 2 years ago
September 10, 2011
pantslessprogressive:

The Workers: an interactive look into the lives of those working on One World Trade Center, the largest construction project in the United States.

Certainly a must-look, all. In their words, in their voices.

pantslessprogressive:

The Workers: an interactive look into the lives of those working on One World Trade Center, the largest construction project in the United States.

Certainly a must-look, all. In their words, in their voices.

(via sunfoundation)

14:16 // 2 years ago