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January 22, 2014
23:45 // 7 months ago
January 14, 2014

D.C. Court of Appeals strikes down FCC net neutrality regulations

  • 2010 The Federal Communications Commission adopted the Open Internet Order, a set of rules dictating how internet service providers could/couldn’t prioritize web traffic; fulfilling a campaign promise from President Obama to continue protecting net neutrality during his time in office.
  • 2014 A federal judge in Washington D.C. struck down the rules adopted under the Open Internet order, saying that the FCC over-stepped its boundaries by implementing the new regulations on ISPs and that Congress would need to formally classify companies like Verizon and Comcast as “common carriers” if it believed the FCC should have the same ability to regulate ISPs as it does telecommunications providers. source
16:16 // 7 months ago
January 7, 2014
15:14 // 7 months ago
September 9, 2013
16:16 // 11 months ago
June 6, 2013
Within hours of the disclosure that the federal authorities routinely collect data on phone calls Americans make, regardless of whether they have any bearing on a counterterrorism investigation, the Obama administration issued the same platitude it has offered every time President Obama has been caught overreaching in the use of his powers: Terrorists are a real menace and you should just trust us to deal with them because we have internal mechanisms (that we are not going to tell you about) to make sure we do not violate your rights.

The New York Times editorial is NOT PLEASED about the news broken by The Guardian about the federal government’s data collection on phone calls through Verizon (essentially everything but the actual conversation). The anger in the editorial is visible and sharp, and is an excellent interrogation of the necessity and effectiveness, as well as the morality, of measures like this one.  (via thepoliticalnotebook)

Hold those feet to the fire!

16:49 // 1 year ago
Within the last few years, this program was used to stop a terrorist attack in the United States. We know that. It’s important. It fills in a little seam that we have, and it’s used to make sure that there is not an international [nexus] to any terrorism event if there may be one ongoing. So in that regard, it is a very valuable thing.
Rep. Mike Rogers, House Intelligence Committee Chairman • Defending a recently revealed NSA program, which collected tens of millions phone records from Verizon, during a press conference on Thursday afternoon. Rep. Rogers claimed that the extremely unpopular program has already prevented at least one act of terrorism, but declined to divulge any additional details, saying such information is still in the process of being declassified. source
15:49 // 1 year ago
1:57 // 1 year ago
The court order doesn’t allow the NSA to collect any information whatsoever on the contents of phone calls, or even to obtain any names or addresses of customers. What’s covered instead is known as “metadata”: the phone number of every caller and recipient; the unique serial number of the phones involved; the time and duration of each phone call; and potentially the location of each of the participants when the call happened. All of this information is being collected on millions of calls every day – every conversation taking place within the US, or between the US and a foreign country is collected.

Telephone metadata and what it can tell the authorities about you | James Ball (via rubenfeld)

Big data, federal-style.

(via rubenfeld)

1:28 // 1 year ago
According to this document obtained by The Guardian, the federal government, through a court order granted to the National Security Agency, is using the Patriot Act to collect the phone records of millions of Verizon users over a three-month period. Awesome. Read the full document here. It’s like the AP thing, except extended to everyone else.

According to this document obtained by The Guardian, the federal government, through a court order granted to the National Security Agency, is using the Patriot Act to collect the phone records of millions of Verizon users over a three-month period. Awesome. Read the full document here. It’s like the AP thing, except extended to everyone else.

1:26 // 1 year ago
August 1, 2012
Today’s action demonstrates that compliance with FCC obligations is not optional. The open device and application obligations were core conditions when Verizon purchased the C-block spectrum. The massive innovation and investment fueled by the Internet have been driven by consumer choice in both devices and applications. The steps taken today will not only protect consumer choice, but defend certainty for innovators to continue to deliver new services and apps without fear of being blocked.
FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski • Regarding an FCC ruling that basically prevents Verizon from charging money for its 4G wi-fi tethering services — a big victory for people who feel like they’re getting screwed by their phone provider. Why’s that? The 4G network was set up to be open and pro-consumer, with cell phone companies having limited influence on how their customers can use it. Verizon Wireless will also voluntarily make a $1.25 million payment to the Treasury to settle the issue.
10:15 // 2 years ago