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January 9, 2014

Stuff you may have missed: January 9, 2014

The managing editor of Mediaite apparently made up an identity for himself to hide the fact that he’s a convicted felon. He came clean over the weekend.

Thanks to a massive chemical spill in West Virginia, more than 100,000 people can’t drink tap water in the state right now.

Tunisia, the country which got the Arab Spring off the ground in 2010, just saw its prime minister resign.

Looking to save money on a ride? Uber just got even cheaper.

Snapchat is sorry for being indifferent to your security.

21:55 // 7 months ago
October 26, 2011

Tunisia’s Islamic “Al Nahda” party may form secular coalition

An islamic/secular coexistence in Tunisia? As the results come back from the first Democratic election in Tunisia’s history (and the first such election to arise from the Arab Spring), all signs are pointing to a coalition government. The most successful party in the election, the Islamist Al Nahda party, failed to win an outright majority (they’re projected around 30%), meaning they will likely seek to team up with two other secular parties, which it’s believed would represent about 60% of the vote. This is an intriguing study in partnered government despite very differing ideals, and we’re very hopeful for the people of Tunisia that it bears fruit. source

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15:08 // 2 years ago
October 23, 2011

Not like Ben Ali’s rule: Tunisian elections draw massive crowds

  • then Elections during the rule of Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali generally drew a fairly small number of people, due to the fact that many believed that the results were pre-determined.
  • now Ten months after the end of Ben Ali’s regime, today’s elections have drawn huge numbers of people, with lines spreading far beyond the polling booths. source

» Not without some controversy: A notable Islamist figure in the country, Rachid Ghannouchi, was heckled as he came out of the voting booth today. “You are a terrorist and an assassin! Go back to London,” one shouted. Ghannouchi, the leader of the moderate Ennahda party, spent over two decades in Britain, exiled from the country where he was once imprisoned for his political views. He returned earlier this year, and his party is expected to do well today.

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12:12 // 2 years ago
October 22, 2011
Now I am happy that my son’s death has given the chance to get beyond fear and injustice. I’m an optimist, I wish success for my country.
Manoubia Bouazizi, mother of notable Tunisian self-immolator Mohamed Bouazizi • Discussing her son’s death and the spark for democracy it provided both in her own country but throughout northern Africa and the Middle East. Tomorrow Tunisia holds its first democratic election after the toppling of Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali ten months ago. (Ben Ali is now in exile in Saudi Arabia.) The Islamist Ennahda party, banned while Ben Ali was in power, is expected to garner the most votes, but not without controversy due to the long-encouraged secular culture in the country. It’ll be interesting to see what happens next. source (viafollow)
22:45 // 2 years ago
pantslessprogressive:

Downfall of the despots. A Lebanese activist carries a caricature as Lebanese policemen stand guard during a protest in solidarity with anti-government protesters in Syria, Yemen and Bahrain, in front of the Arab league headquarters in Beirut. The caricature depicts (from right to left) Tunisia’s former President Ben Ali, Egypt’s former President Hosni Mubarak, Libya’s former leader Muammar Gaddafi, Yemen’s President Ali Abdullah Saleh and Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad. [Photo: Mohamed Azakir/Reuters]

Fascinating illo. Nice twist on the Time theme.

pantslessprogressive:

Downfall of the despots. A Lebanese activist carries a caricature as Lebanese policemen stand guard during a protest in solidarity with anti-government protesters in Syria, Yemen and Bahrain, in front of the Arab league headquarters in Beirut. The caricature depicts (from right to left) Tunisia’s former President Ben Ali, Egypt’s former President Hosni Mubarak, Libya’s former leader Muammar Gaddafi, Yemen’s President Ali Abdullah Saleh and Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad. [Photo: Mohamed Azakir/Reuters]

Fascinating illo. Nice twist on the Time theme.

11:53 // 2 years ago
August 28, 2011
Tripoli needs lots of food. There is nothing there … we’re bringing this to them and then we’ll do more runs as needed.
Libyan man Lassad Trabelsi • Regarding the decision to open up the main border between Tunisia and Libya. Trabelsi was one of many people driving trucks through through the crossing in order to get supplies, which has been tough considering, you know, the deadly civil war in the country. And Tunisians are ready to help. “We’re ready to supply whatever our brothers need,” said one supplier who set up near the border. source (viafollow)
11:12 // 3 years ago
August 22, 2011
washingtonpoststyle:

theatlantic:

Qaddafi with Mubarak and Ben Ali, One Year Ago

 
Taken less than a year before, the photo captured the ear-to-ear smiles of the leaders of several autocratic regimes. At the center of the photo stood Gaddafi, smiling and resplendent in his golden-brown robes and trademark sunglasses.
To his far left stood then-Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, laughing, and looking for all the world like he was invincible. To his right stood then-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, with Gaddafi’s elbow jauntily on his soldier.

 
Via The Washington Post

Via us.

Saleh’s in there too! It’s like the genesis of the Arab Spring, in a single room.

washingtonpoststyle:

theatlantic:

Qaddafi with Mubarak and Ben Ali, One Year Ago

Taken less than a year before, the photo captured the ear-to-ear smiles of the leaders of several autocratic regimes. At the center of the photo stood Gaddafi, smiling and resplendent in his golden-brown robes and trademark sunglasses.

To his far left stood then-Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, laughing, and looking for all the world like he was invincible. To his right stood then-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, with Gaddafi’s elbow jauntily on his soldier.

Via The Washington Post

Via us.

Saleh’s in there too! It’s like the genesis of the Arab Spring, in a single room.

(via nightline)

10:55 // 3 years ago
June 20, 2011
He boarded the plane with his family after ordering the crew to wait for him in Jeddah. But after his arrival in Jeddah, the plane returned to Tunisia, without waiting for him, contrary to his orders. He did not leave his post as president of the republic and hasn’t fled Tunisia as he was falsely accused of doing.
A statement by Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali’s lawyers • Claiming he didn’t actually leave Tunisia amid protests as was reported by just about everyone. Instead, he claims he was basically ditched. Seems like a fascinating thing to say … six months after the fact. A Tunisian court is trying Ben Ali in absentia for a series of crimes, including theft and illegal possession of firearms and other things he probably shouldn’t have had. source (viafollow)
11:08 // 3 years ago
May 27, 2011

G8 Summit: Arab Spring nations will receive billions in aid

  • what G8 leaders plan to pledge around $20 billion to Arab Spring countries — particularly Egypt and Tunisia, where successful protests led to the ousting of dictators and the possible rise of democracy.
  • why To put it simply, they feel that if they don’t, the countries could face economic hardships that might lead to the rise of extremism. Many G8 nations will also act on their own to help the countries. source
9:40 // 3 years ago
May 19, 2011
12:33 // 3 years ago