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November 4, 2013
11:00 // 5 months ago
There already is some talk about this event being a “random” one. But it is not. These things are becoming as regular as rain, as predictable as the summer heat.
Charles Pierce of Esquire Magazine says Friday’s LAX shooting was nothing random, even when many across America are starting to call these shootings “random.” They’re absolutely not. The shooting was a political one and there is nothing random about terrorism. 
10:30 // 5 months ago
10:00 // 5 months ago
November 2, 2013
Each week, the TSA throws up a blog post informing the public of weapons confiscated by agents at checkpoints. This week, the agency said 29 firearms were confiscated in the past week alone. Just two were unloaded; nine had a round in the chamber.
The post takes on extra significance this week, as the agency lost one of its own in the line of duty, as he was shot to death at the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). Suspect Paul Ciancia, who is currently in custody after being wounded by police, is reported to have held anti-government views based on a statement he was carrying with him, and some witnesses suggested that the 23-year-old was only going after TSA agents.
I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve never been comfortable with the TSA, and their security policies are probably something of an overcorrection to a degree. But the TSA does have value, even if it does feel like it’s just for show 80 percent of the time, or it does feel overly invasive for what it is. Even if we don’t like their methods, we have to learn to either make peace with them or to find constructive ways to change them.
Our trust in the government has been shaken this year (google “Edward Snowden" if you don’t believe me), but there are clearly better ways to handle this than the route Ciancia appears to have chosen. It’s too bad that we have those actions as an example of what not to do. Our anger as a culture has plenty of room to simmer; there’s no need for it to boil. — Ernie @ SFB

Each week, the TSA throws up a blog post informing the public of weapons confiscated by agents at checkpoints. This week, the agency said 29 firearms were confiscated in the past week alone. Just two were unloaded; nine had a round in the chamber.

The post takes on extra significance this week, as the agency lost one of its own in the line of duty, as he was shot to death at the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). Suspect Paul Ciancia, who is currently in custody after being wounded by police, is reported to have held anti-government views based on a statement he was carrying with him, and some witnesses suggested that the 23-year-old was only going after TSA agents.

I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve never been comfortable with the TSA, and their security policies are probably something of an overcorrection to a degree. But the TSA does have value, even if it does feel like it’s just for show 80 percent of the time, or it does feel overly invasive for what it is. Even if we don’t like their methods, we have to learn to either make peace with them or to find constructive ways to change them.

Our trust in the government has been shaken this year (google “Edward Snowden" if you don’t believe me), but there are clearly better ways to handle this than the route Ciancia appears to have chosen. It’s too bad that we have those actions as an example of what not to do. Our anger as a culture has plenty of room to simmer; there’s no need for it to boil. — Ernie @ SFB

14:34 // 5 months ago
November 1, 2013
I’m fine. I got shot. Don’t worry, I’ve been shot before.

TSA worker who was injured in today’s LAX shooting.

I hate the TSA.  But this man is a certifiable badass.

Go find better employment, sir.  The world needs you someplace else.

(via letterstomycountry)

15:42 // 5 months ago
October 6, 2013
Signs the government shutdown is seriously hurting the TSA: A 9-year-old boy somehow managed to board a flight from Minneapolis to Las Vegas without a ticket (or an adult), something that was only figured out when the flight was already halfway to Vegas. If anyone is looking to create a sequel for the above movie, this kid just created the plot.

Signs the government shutdown is seriously hurting the TSA: A 9-year-old boy somehow managed to board a flight from Minneapolis to Las Vegas without a ticket (or an adult), something that was only figured out when the flight was already halfway to Vegas. If anyone is looking to create a sequel for the above movie, this kid just created the plot.

18:16 // 6 months ago
April 15, 2013
14:28 // 1 year ago
January 28, 2013
wired:

A Virginia man who wrote an abbreviated version of the Fourth Amendment on his body and stripped to his shorts at an airport security screening area won a trial Friday in his lawsuit seeking $250,000 in damages for being detained on a disorderly conduct charge.
[via Threat Level]
…hooray for America?

More impressive than the victory? The man’s chest-writing skills.

wired:

A Virginia man who wrote an abbreviated version of the Fourth Amendment on his body and stripped to his shorts at an airport security screening area won a trial Friday in his lawsuit seeking $250,000 in damages for being detained on a disorderly conduct charge.

[via Threat Level]


…hooray for America?

More impressive than the victory? The man’s chest-writing skills.

(Source: Wired, via laughterkey)

9:26 // 1 year ago
January 17, 2013
Great news, everyone: The TSA is chucking the last of the naked-body scanners. Why’s that? Well, a company that was supposed to meet a deadline to get rid of the naked-body images on the machines and replace them with not-so-naked images … didn’t. So the TSA is dropping their contract and switching to companies that don’t use such … um, revealing images. The full-body scans are sticking around. They’ll just be less naked.

Great news, everyone: The TSA is chucking the last of the naked-body scanners. Why’s that? Well, a company that was supposed to meet a deadline to get rid of the naked-body images on the machines and replace them with not-so-naked images … didn’t. So the TSA is dropping their contract and switching to companies that don’t use such … um, revealing images. The full-body scans are sticking around. They’ll just be less naked.

23:46 // 1 year ago
October 20, 2012
Big airports remove X-ray scanners, but not due to privacy concerns
Citing concerns of time and delays, the the Transportation Security Administration has begun removing the controversial X-ray body scanners from some large airports, and replacing them with more modern millimeter-wave scanners, which don’t have many of the radiation or privacy issues the older machines have — in part because they show a person’s profile in a cartoon style, rather than the pseudo-nudity of the older machines. The older machines are getting moved to smaller airports, where the time delays caused are less of an issue. ”They’re not all being replaced,” said  TSA spokesman David Castelveter. “It’s being done strategically. We are replacing some of the older equipment and taking them to smaller airports. That will be done over a period of time.” (photo by Michael Nagle/Getty Images)

Big airports remove X-ray scanners, but not due to privacy concerns

Citing concerns of time and delays, the the Transportation Security Administration has begun removing the controversial X-ray body scanners from some large airports, and replacing them with more modern millimeter-wave scanners, which don’t have many of the radiation or privacy issues the older machines have — in part because they show a person’s profile in a cartoon style, rather than the pseudo-nudity of the older machines. The older machines are getting moved to smaller airports, where the time delays caused are less of an issue. ”They’re not all being replaced,” said  TSA spokesman David Castelveter. “It’s being done strategically. We are replacing some of the older equipment and taking them to smaller airports. That will be done over a period of time.” (photo by Michael Nagle/Getty Images)

11:17 // 1 year ago