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January 1, 2014
The Challenger accident is an important part of our history; a tragic reminder that space exploration is risky and should never be trivialized. NASA works every day to honor the legacy of our fallen astronauts as we carry out our mission to reach for new heights and explore the universe.
Lauren B. Worley, NASA’s press secretary • In response to a new single from Beyonce that features bits of audio recorded in the moments after the space shuttle Challenger exploded. The singer has come under fire from several family members of the Challenger crew as well, though she’s said that the song ‘XO’ was included as a tribute to those lost back in 1986. source
17:17 // 7 months ago
November 10, 2013
theatlantic:

Before it arrives in Sochi, the Olympic torch will spend some time in space

Is it possible to be jealous of an inanimate object? If so, then I am jealous of an inanimate object. Specifically, of the Sochi 2014 Olympic flame. Which has spent the past month—and will spend another three months—taking an envy-inducingly epic tour of Earth. 
Before it makes its way to the shores of southern Russia in early February, the Olympic torch, with its symbolic flame, will have traveled to the North Pole (on a high-speed, nuclear-powered icebreaker). It will have summited Mount Elbrus, Europe’s highest peak. It will have descended to the bottom of Lake Baikal, the world’s deepest lake. It will have been transported by plane, train, car, icebreaker, and, yes, reindeer sleigh to more than 130 cities and towns in Russia. It will have traveled nearly 40,000 miles—the longest route in Olympic history—carried by some 14,000 people. It will have gotten to witness some of the most amazing places on Earth. 
And also! Some of the most amazing places outside of Earth. Because the Sochi 2014 torch, on top of everything else, is going on a spacewalk. 
Read more. [Image: NASA]


Super neat. 

theatlantic:

Before it arrives in Sochi, the Olympic torch will spend some time in space

Is it possible to be jealous of an inanimate object? If so, then I am jealous of an inanimate object. Specifically, of the Sochi 2014 Olympic flame. Which has spent the past month—and will spend another three months—taking an envy-inducingly epic tour of Earth.

Before it makes its way to the shores of southern Russia in early February, the Olympic torch, with its symbolic flame, will have traveled to the North Pole (on a high-speed, nuclear-powered icebreaker). It will have summited Mount Elbrus, Europe’s highest peak. It will have descended to the bottom of Lake Baikal, the world’s deepest lake. It will have been transported by plane, train, car, icebreaker, and, yes, reindeer sleigh to more than 130 cities and towns in Russia. It will have traveled nearly 40,000 miles—the longest route in Olympic history—carried by some 14,000 people. It will have gotten to witness some of the most amazing places on Earth. 

And also! Some of the most amazing places outside of Earth. Because the Sochi 2014 torch, on top of everything else, is going on a spacewalk.

Read more. [Image: NASA]

Super neat. 

9:33 // 9 months ago
November 5, 2013

More on Legos and space

jtotheizzoe says: **Not technically in space, since 90,000 feet is only about a quarter of the way to the 100-kilometer Kármán line that officially represents the boundary between Earth and space, but let’s not split Lego hairs here.

» SFB says: Correction accepted and appended. — Ernie @ SFB

(Source: metro.co.uk)

13:23 // 9 months ago
February 9, 2013
This is indeed a remarkably close approach for an asteroid this size. We estimate that an asteroid of this size passes this close to the Earth only once every few decades.
Paul Chodas, research scientist for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory •  Speaking on DA14, a 150-foot wide asteroid which is expected to make the closest flyby of the planet Earth on record. Estimated for 2:24 PM EST on February 15th, the asteroid will pass us, cosmically speaking, by a razor-thin margin – it’ll be ten times closer to Earth than the orbit of the Moon. Researchers assure there won’t be a collision, however – the asteroid will pass over the Indian Ocean, near Sumatra. source  
14:04 // 1 year ago
October 15, 2012
23:20 // 1 year ago
September 19, 2012
Yes. Next question.

Yes. Next question.

13:57 // 1 year ago
September 15, 2012
theweekmagazine:



Jupiter may have “saved Earth from a devastating cosmic collision” on Monday when it took a hit from what may have been a massive asteroid, resulting in a 100-mile-wide fireball large enough to be caught on film from Earth.This is the third time since 2009 observers have seen an impact flash on Jupiter’s surface, and some astronomers think the big planet’s gravitational pull serves as a sort of “cosmic shield” for the inner rings of planets — including Earth — “sweeping up incoming objects that would have a deadlier effect” if they were to crash into us. A few scientists think that without Jupiter’s protection, life on Earth wouldn’t have been able to develop.Watch the collision on Jupiter



Remember folks, it always pays to have a cosmic bodyguard.

theweekmagazine:

Jupiter may have “saved Earth from a devastating cosmic collision” on Monday when it took a hit from what may have been a massive asteroid, resulting in a 100-mile-wide fireball large enough to be caught on film from Earth.

This is the third time since 2009 observers have seen an impact flash on Jupiter’s surface, and some astronomers think the big planet’s gravitational pull serves as a sort of “cosmic shield” for the inner rings of planets — including Earth — “sweeping up incoming objects that would have a deadlier effect” if they were to crash into us. A few scientists think that without Jupiter’s protection, life on Earth wouldn’t have been able to develop.

Watch the collision on Jupiter

Remember folks, it always pays to have a cosmic bodyguard.

18:23 // 1 year ago
September 11, 2012
inothernews:

I LOOK GOOD   A mosaic of photos taken by an imager on NASA’s Curiosity rover shows the underside of the rover and its six wheels, with Martian terrain stretching back to the horizon. The four circular features on the front edge of the rover are the lenses for the left and right sets of Curiosity’s hazard avoidance cameras, or Hazcams. Because of the different perspectives used for different images, some of the borders of the photos don’t line up precisely.  (Photo: ASA / JPL via NBC News)

Considering he’s on Mars all by himself, I don’t think we can judge Curiosity for the incomplete camera work.

inothernews:

I LOOK GOOD   A mosaic of photos taken by an imager on NASA’s Curiosity rover shows the underside of the rover and its six wheels, with Martian terrain stretching back to the horizon. The four circular features on the front edge of the rover are the lenses for the left and right sets of Curiosity’s hazard avoidance cameras, or Hazcams. Because of the different perspectives used for different images, some of the borders of the photos don’t line up precisely.  (Photo: ASA / JPL via NBC News)

Considering he’s on Mars all by himself, I don’t think we can judge Curiosity for the incomplete camera work.

10:13 // 1 year ago
August 28, 2012
nbcnews:

Listen to the first song from Mars
Hip-hop musician Will.i.am’s “Reach for the Stars” officially became the first song broadcast from Mars today, thanks to a signal beamed from NASA’s Curiosity rover.
“This is the first time that a song’s ever come from another planet,” Leland Melvin, NASA’s associate administrator for education and a former astronaut, told students at an educational event at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
Read the complete story. 

You know, if the aliens come, we should be promoting our highest artistic work. Not the Black Eyed Peas. It’s like introducing Martians to our cinematic history through “Santa Claus Conquers the Martians.” I mean, how hard would it have been to put on some John Cage for these folks? You wouldn’t even have had to broadcast anything!

nbcnews:

Listen to the first song from Mars

Hip-hop musician Will.i.am’s “Reach for the Stars” officially became the first song broadcast from Mars today, thanks to a signal beamed from NASA’s Curiosity rover.

“This is the first time that a song’s ever come from another planet,” Leland Melvin, NASA’s associate administrator for education and a former astronaut, told students at an educational event at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

Read the complete story. 

You know, if the aliens come, we should be promoting our highest artistic work. Not the Black Eyed Peas. It’s like introducing Martians to our cinematic history through “Santa Claus Conquers the Martians.” I mean, how hard would it have been to put on some John Cage for these folks? You wouldn’t even have had to broadcast anything!

(via nbcnews)

18:56 // 1 year ago
August 22, 2012

hypervocal:

Watch Curiosity land on Mars in full, glorious HD. 

There’s a little noise reduction, color balance and sharpening, but this is all Mars, baby. Now that the MARDI descent imager has sent home its full collection of 1600 by 1200 images, NASA could piece together a video of the landing. Missing frames were interpolated using thumbnail data.

MORE MARS:
• 7 Years in 7 Minutes: NASA Engineer Takes Us Inside the Landing
• Obama Mentions ‘Mohawk Guy’ on NASA Call, Gets Mohawk
• Watch Ecstatic NASA Engineers Celebrate as Curiosity Lands

High-resolution Mars will be the coolest thing you’ll see today.

10:41 // 2 years ago