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April 11, 2014
10:04 // 3 months ago
April 4, 2013
I’m not going to rule out anything right now.
Former Massachusetts Sen. Scott ”bqhatevwr” Brown • Suggesting that a senate run in New Hampshire was a real possibility for him. He made the statement in the Granite State homestead of Nashua—the first of four visits to the state in the next five weeks. Current Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen is up for reelection in 2014. source
20:40 // 1 year ago
November 6, 2012
21:45 // 1 year ago
21:08 // 1 year ago
October 30, 2012

Scott Brown says no final debate reschedule needed, Warren camp disagrees

  • then When asked by the media last Friday about concerns the fourth and final Massachusetts senate debate would be cancelled, due to the impending arrival of Hurricane Sandy, Sen. Scott Brown made it clear he wanted the show to go on — even if he had to have a mighty awkward carpool: “That’s why I have a truck. You know it has four-wheel drive. If she needs a ride, I’m happy to pick her up, and I’ll be there, providing the electricity is on.”
  • now The tables have turned, as it’s now Warren’s camp is eager to make up the date in the aftermath of Sandy, while Team Brown demurs. “We’ve already had three debates. There’s only a few days left, and we have a very, very busy schedule,” Brown told reporters today, while touring damage from last night’s storm in Westport. The Warren campaign, according to a spokeswoman, has indicated to debate organizers that she’d be available on Thursday night if so decided. source
19:08 // 1 year ago
September 20, 2012

Harry Reid cancels Senate votes for the day so Scott Brown can make debate

  • Scott Brown ”I’m sure if we don’t make [the debate] tonight, we’ll reschedule it for Monday or something,” the Senator said around 2pm today, just hours before a scheduled debate with his Senate opponent Elizabeth Warren. “Bottom line is, the people have sent me down here to do my job — and that’s to vote.” Democrats immediately accused Brown of attempting to avoid the debate.
  • Harry Reid ”No more votes today. It’s obvious to me what’s going on. I’ve been to a few of these rodeos,” the Majority Leader said shortly after Brown’s comments. “One of the senators who doesn’t want to debate tonight won’t be in a debate. While he can’t use the Senate as an excuse, there will be no more votes today.” Reid canceled the rest of the votes for the day so that Brown could make the debate—which he did. source

The Massachusetts Senate race is shaping up to be one of the closest races of 2012, with Brown and Warren consistently running within just a few points of one another. If you missed tonight’s debate, here are two recaps

21:52 // 1 year ago
September 8, 2012
In an electoral season marked by high levels of polarization, Republicans being vocal about their disdain for President Obama is beyond a norm — it’s fundamental to a broad campaign strategy. But, as go constituency attitudes, so must go the officials who’re seeking their votes. This is very evident in Massachusetts, where GOP Senator Scott Brown, fending off a challenge from Democrat Elizabeth Warren, is slated to run an ad today touting President Obama’s praise of Brown’s support of a bill against congressional insider trading. The predictable reason — Obama’s positive approval ratings in Massachusetts, and the centrist votes a Republican needs to win the traditionally blue state. (Photo by American Solutions) source

In an electoral season marked by high levels of polarization, Republicans being vocal about their disdain for President Obama is beyond a norm — it’s fundamental to a broad campaign strategy. But, as go constituency attitudes, so must go the officials who’re seeking their votes. This is very evident in Massachusetts, where GOP Senator Scott Brown, fending off a challenge from Democrat Elizabeth Warren, is slated to run an ad today touting President Obama’s praise of Brown’s support of a bill against congressional insider trading. The predictable reason — Obama’s positive approval ratings in Massachusetts, and the centrist votes a Republican needs to win the traditionally blue state. (Photo by American Solutions) source

20:04 // 1 year ago
July 24, 2012

How the Massachusetts Senate race neutralized outside campaign ads — perhaps too well

Back in January, Republican Sen. Scott Brown and his Senate opponent, Elizabeth Warren, signed a pledge to effectively ban or neutralize outside money — saying that they would donate to charity if a group advertised for them or against their opponent. Brown, who faced a tough 2010 special election for this reason, fought for the deal — which was initially seen as a coup for him because of his war chest. But since then, Warren has had one very prime weak spot — her ancestry controversy — that outside groups weren’t able to exploit because of the document above. Plus, she’s become a huge fundraiser in her own right. So Brown is suddenly having regrets. But is this an example that other campaigns can follow?

8:06 // 2 years ago
June 19, 2012
This non-endorsement pledge is unprecedented and is not being required of any other persons or entities. To us, such a pledge seems inappropriate when a non-media sponsor issues a debate invitation. We can assure both campaigns that the debate will be fair, just as the one we cosponsored between Senator Brown and Attorney General Martha Coakley in 2010 was fair.
A statement by the Edward M. Kennedy Institute • Expressing anger over a main condition set by Sen. Scott Brown that he’ll only take part in senatorial debates to be held at the institute on the condition that Vicki Kennedy, Ted Kennedy’s widow who plays a key role in the institute, not endorse anyone in the campaign. Brown’s campaign manager, upon word of this statement, said Brown would decline the offer to debate: “We respect Vicki Kennedy’s decision but we regret that we cannot accept a debate invitation from someone who plans to endorse Scott Brown’s opponent.” (ht sarahlee310)
21:06 // 2 years ago
June 6, 2012
18:54 // 2 years ago