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May 27, 2013
For the first time in 400 years, this moss: A few years back, University of Alberta biologist Catherine La Farge found remnants of moss frozen in a glacier since the Little Ice Age. She then took some of the ancient plant material, ground it up, and put the remnants in a number of petri dishes. Despite the fact that those plant cells were frozen for hundreds of years, new life grew in those petri dishes. Cool, eh?

For the first time in 400 years, this moss: A few years back, University of Alberta biologist Catherine La Farge found remnants of moss frozen in a glacier since the Little Ice Age. She then took some of the ancient plant material, ground it up, and put the remnants in a number of petri dishes. Despite the fact that those plant cells were frozen for hundreds of years, new life grew in those petri dishes. Cool, eh?

20:08 // 11 months ago
May 14, 2013
Idea: What if the federal government gave someone like Neil DeGrasse Tyson a “Science Laureate” role, like we do for poets? Sound like a good idea? Fortunately, members of Congress are already working on it.

Idea: What if the federal government gave someone like Neil DeGrasse Tyson a “Science Laureate” role, like we do for poets? Sound like a good idea? Fortunately, members of Congress are already working on it.

12:55 // 11 months ago
April 30, 2013
theweekmagazine:

Genetically modified animals that glow in the dark
Scientists inserted a gene into cats that helps them resist Feline immunodeficiency virus—a close relative of HIV and tracked it with a green fluorescent protein. These cats appeared normal during the day, but can glow at night if prompted.

Thanks science.

While the above glow-in-the-dark kitten is obviously the internet kingpin of the all the photos behind this link, we’re equally mesmerized by the glowing sheep.

theweekmagazine:

Genetically modified animals that glow in the dark

Scientists inserted a gene into cats that helps them resist Feline immunodeficiency virus—a close relative of HIV and tracked it with a green fluorescent protein. These cats appeared normal during the day, but can glow at night if prompted.


Thanks science.

While the above glow-in-the-dark kitten is obviously the internet kingpin of the all the photos behind this link, we’re equally mesmerized by the glowing sheep.

19:14 // 11 months ago
April 13, 2013
Scientists have been working on analyzing this ancient fellow, called Australopithecus sediba, a creature dated somewhere around 2 million years old. It’s not clear yet where he or she might fit into our own evolutionary record. Discovered in South Africa in 2008, researchers determined it could both walk upright and climb through trees. Said Jeremy DeSilva, a lead author of one of the papers on A. sediba released Thursday: “I didn’t think you could have this combination, that hand with that pelvis with that foot… And yet, there it is.” (Photo from Lee R. Burger, University of the Witwatersrand) source

Scientists have been working on analyzing this ancient fellow, called Australopithecus sediba, a creature dated somewhere around 2 million years old. It’s not clear yet where he or she might fit into our own evolutionary record. Discovered in South Africa in 2008, researchers determined it could both walk upright and climb through trees. Said Jeremy DeSilva, a lead author of one of the papers on A. sediba released Thursday: “I didn’t think you could have this combination, that hand with that pelvis with that foot… And yet, there it is.” (Photo from Lee R. Burger, University of the Witwatersrand) source

15:55 // 1 year ago
April 12, 2013
10:21 // 1 year ago
March 26, 2013
Number of two-headed bull shark fetuses we’re going to post about today? Just one. OK, technically two. (via National Geographic)

Number of two-headed bull shark fetuses we’re going to post about today? Just one. OK, technically two. (via National Geographic)

19:03 // 1 year ago
March 9, 2013

New scientific study rates our dire place in climate history

  • 4000year high for global temperatures, according to a new research study headed by climatologist Shaun Marcott of Oregon State University. The study utilized the most in-depth reconstruction of climate information from over the last 11,300 years, virtually the entire Holocene era, and was released in the academic magazine Science earlier this week. source
17:14 // 1 year ago
February 23, 2013
In a memorandum issued on Friday, John P. Holdren, science adviser to President Obama, called for scientific papers that report the results of federally financed research to become freely accessible within a year or so after publication. The findings are typically published in scientific journals, many of which are open only to paying subscribers. The new policy would apply to federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy and the Department of Agriculture, that finance more than $100 million a year of research. The agencies have six months to submit plans for how they would carry out the new policy. The hope is that broad access to scientific results will encourage faster progress on research and will let anyone apply the knowledge for technological advances.

U.S. Speeds Access to Publicly Financed Scientific Research - NYTimes.com (via dendroica)

We admit we’re not exactly entrenched in the world of federally-backed scientific reports, but this certainly seems like a worthy idea, even if it doesn’t spur more research as desired, to give some of these findings more public profile — any dissenters out there? What do you think?

(via dendroica)

13:13 // 1 year ago
February 13, 2013
An interesting read from The Atlantic for anyone else tired of hearing about the State of the Union, Sen. Marco Rubio, or Christopher Jordan Dorner on what has turned out to be a rather slow news day. 

An interesting read from The Atlantic for anyone else tired of hearing about the State of the Union, Sen. Marco Rubio, or Christopher Jordan Dorner on what has turned out to be a rather slow news day. 

17:52 // 1 year ago
January 18, 2013
20:03 // 1 year ago