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January 17, 2014
The reason why pop radio is so repetitive, in a single chart.

The reason why pop radio is so repetitive, in a single chart.

14:08 // 8 months ago
November 30, 2012

futurejournalismproject:

Michael Jackson’s Thriller Turns 30

Billboard has an interesting history about the November 30, 1982 release of Thriller. In it, we learn of technology disruption (FM was replacing AM radio) and the audience fragmentation that occurred because of it.

We also learn about CBS Records’ concern over the album’s potential success:

Since the start of the [80s], black music had been increasingly banished from most white-targeted radio stations. This was partially due the virulent, reactionary anti-disco backlash that resulted in the implosion of that genre at the end of 1979. As the 80’s dawned, programmers increasingly stayed clear of rhythm-driven black music out of fear of being branded “disco,” even when the black music in question bore little resemblance to disco. This backlash was greatly magnified by the demise of AM mass appeal Top 40 radio at the hands of FM, which led to black artists being ghettoized on urban contemporary radio, while disappearing from pop radio, which focused on a more narrow white audience.

How dramatic was the decline of black music on the pop charts in that period? In 1979, nearly half of the songs on the weekly Billboard Hot 100 pop chart could also be found on the urban contemporary chart. By 1982, the amount of black music on the Hot 100 was down by almost 80%.

Also, and notably, MTV had just launched. But the music videos the station played were very white as it followed the playlists occurring on the FM charts. They too were very hesitant to give Jackson airtime.

[MTV executives at the time] concede that the channel initially assumed it would not play the video, as its thumping beat and urban production did not fit the channel’s “rock” image. They contend however that in mid-February, after seeing the clip—which was possibly the best that had ever come across their desks—they began to re-think things.

Good thing they did.

Billboard, Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’ at 30: How One Album Changed the World.

How a legendary album got its footing.

11:29 // 1 year ago
August 6, 2012
22:21 // 2 years ago
June 9, 2012
My brother has always been ‘work-averse.’ Now, apparently, even the one hour a week is killing him!
Ray Magliozzi • The younger half of the Car Talk brothers (Ray is 63, Tom is 74), cracking wise at his elder brother’s expense on the matter of the pair’s impending retirement from radio. Car Talk has been a popular mainstay on National Public Radio’s member stations for the past 25 years, and Ray and Tom’s broadcasting careers go back even further — Car Talk was first broadcast in Boston back in 1977. Their final show will air in September, but the Car Talk franchise will continue on for a while even without new material from the iconic pair — NPR will keep broadcasting reassembled episodes drawn from their extensive archives. source (viafollow)
14:49 // 2 years ago
March 13, 2012
theatlantic:

For the Next Two Weeks, Rush Limbaugh Won’t Have National Advertisers

Right after releasing an ever-growing-list companies that don’t want anything to do with Rush Limbaugh on Monday (the count is at 140), the broadcaster’s distributor has sent out a memo telling affiliates to suspend national advertising spots for the next two weeks.
Though Premiere Radio Networks did not specifically comment on why the suspension was needed, but it does address one problem in particular: In the past week, several companies were unaware that their ads had aired during Limbaugh’s show in the wake of his comments about Sandra Fluke.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]


The real question, obviously: If Rush lays low for two weeks with advertisers, will they eventually come back? In a related note, David Frum makes the astute point that Mike Huckabee (who’s jumping in the talk-radio game with a friendlier approach) is a real, genuine threat to Rush’s long-term future on radio, partly because he’s safer for advertisers, partly because he’s competing for the same time slot, and partly because his timing is perfect.

theatlantic:

For the Next Two Weeks, Rush Limbaugh Won’t Have National Advertisers

Right after releasing an ever-growing-list companies that don’t want anything to do with Rush Limbaugh on Monday (the count is at 140), the broadcaster’s distributor has sent out a memo telling affiliates to suspend national advertising spots for the next two weeks.

Though Premiere Radio Networks did not specifically comment on why the suspension was needed, but it does address one problem in particular: In the past week, several companies were unaware that their ads had aired during Limbaugh’s show in the wake of his comments about Sandra Fluke.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

The real question, obviously: If Rush lays low for two weeks with advertisers, will they eventually come back? In a related note, David Frum makes the astute point that Mike Huckabee (who’s jumping in the talk-radio game with a friendlier approach) is a real, genuine threat to Rush’s long-term future on radio, partly because he’s safer for advertisers, partly because he’s competing for the same time slot, and partly because his timing is perfect.

10:45 // 2 years ago
March 3, 2012
21:18 // 2 years ago
October 2, 2011
21:42 // 2 years ago