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February 13, 2013
An interesting read from The Atlantic for anyone else tired of hearing about the State of the Union, Sen. Marco Rubio, or Christopher Jordan Dorner on what has turned out to be a rather slow news day. 

An interesting read from The Atlantic for anyone else tired of hearing about the State of the Union, Sen. Marco Rubio, or Christopher Jordan Dorner on what has turned out to be a rather slow news day. 

17:52 // 1 year ago
April 8, 2012
People are just very reactive online. Things happen very quickly and we expect to get quick results. In reality things take time. Our expectations of the speed at which things happen online is not matched by reality.
Psychologist Nathalie Nahai • Speaking about how anger builds online in a very reactionary sense, which often manifests itself in a mob-like form. Anonymity is a major factor to this, Nahai says, as is the lack of clear human response. “There is no filter for this,” she says. “Social platforms provide one of those modes of communication where you can be absolutely horrendous and not worry about it. When we talk to someone on the phone we are primed to respond to voices and it’s a much more intimate way of communicating. When you remove social cues and reactions, it becomes easier to not think about it.” What do you think? Are you an angrier person online than you are in person? The Next Web’s article is targeted at startups, but if you ask us, there’s something in here we can all learn from.
12:05 // 2 years ago
May 25, 2011
These data are the first to demonstrate that not only do whites think more progress has been made toward equality than do blacks, but whites also now believe that this progress is linked to a new inequality — at their expense.
Tufts University psychologist Samuel Sommers • Describing his study, published in the peer-reviewed Perspectives on Psychological Science, which shows that some white people feel that, as blacks gain ground in society, they’re falling behind. Which is to say that, due to societal changes, many whites feel they receive detrimental treatment compared to blacks. It’s a perception which, while felt by some whites, isn’t necessarily true, according to Sommers. On top of flying in the face of ample evidence to the contrary, he notes that it’s felt worst in the job market. “Economists have documented over and over again that it takes twice as many resumes to get a call back from an employer if you have a black-sounding name,” he says. This is a study we wish didn’t exist. We still have a way to go. (thanks reallyfoxnews) source (viafollow)
23:24 // 2 years ago