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May 27, 2013

Poll: Majority of American public still opposes “Obamacare” legislation

  • 54% of Americans don’t support the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare, according to the latest CNN/ORC International poll. The data shows no significant change in public support/opposition since a similar poll was conducted after the law’s passage back in 2010. 
  • 43% of Americans support the law, with roughly three quarters of all Democrats holding a positive opinion of President Obama’s signature legislative achievement. Just over one-third of those who responded to the survey said they opposed the ACA because it is “too liberal,” while a mere 16 percent said they believed the law didn’t go far enough. source
14:55 // 11 months ago
May 24, 2013
Basically, Republicans are attacking Obama where he is least vulnerable and at a time when they have minimal credibility. It isn’t working. By trying to turn everything into a scandal rather than saying Obama’s policies are wrongheaded—and rather than fixing their own image problems with minority, female, younger, and moderate voters—Republicans are focusing on attacking a guy whose name will never again appear on a ballot.
Polling guru and political analyst Charlie Cook, explaining why Republicans’ attacks on President Obama may ultimately fall flat. Despite the media feeding frenzy over the three concurrent scandals to hit the Obama White House, the President’s approval rating has hardly suffered at all: In general, it’s hovered around 51%, with one poll even showing an uptick since April. Meanwhile, a recent CNN poll showed the Republican Party with the highest negative ratings—59%—that either party has received in more than 20 years. “Americans may not be ecstatic about President Obama and his policies,” Cook writes, “but compared with the Republicans, they think Obama doesn’t look so bad.” source
17:30 // 11 months ago
May 6, 2013

It’s neck and neck in the race to represent South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District

  • 47-46 the lead former South Carolina governor Mark Sanford holds over his opponent, Democratic candidate Elizabeth Colbert Busch, one day before the election that will determine which candidate will represent the state’s 1st Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives. Just two weeks ago, Sanford trailed Colbert Busch by 9 points. Guess that Larry Flynt endorsement went a long way, huh? source
14:07 // 11 months ago
February 23, 2013
pewresearch:

While Obama’s job ratings are up at least slightly among many demographic groups, one of the most striking turnarounds over the past year is in the views of Hispanics. Read more.

It’s hard not to assume that the upswing in President Obama’s job approval rating among hispanics relates to the recent push for immigration reform. And though well it may be, it’s worth remembering that immigration isn’t the sole politically-influenced area of hispanic life in America. There’s a panoply of topics before us  — jobs, health care, education, justice, and social issues among them — that animate people across all demographic lines. It’s important not to lose sight of that complexity.

pewresearch:

While Obama’s job ratings are up at least slightly among many demographic groups, one of the most striking turnarounds over the past year is in the views of Hispanics. Read more.

It’s hard not to assume that the upswing in President Obama’s job approval rating among hispanics relates to the recent push for immigration reform. And though well it may be, it’s worth remembering that immigration isn’t the sole politically-influenced area of hispanic life in America. There’s a panoply of topics before us — jobs, health care, education, justice, and social issues among them — that animate people across all demographic lines. It’s important not to lose sight of that complexity.

15:19 // 1 year ago
January 10, 2013

Congress more popular than meth labs, less popular than Nickelback

cognitivedissonance:

Recently, Public Policy Polling sought to discover just how low the public’s opinion of Congress had fallen, testing the popularity of the U.S. Congress against twenty-six different, typically unpopular things. We all know that the American people have a less-than-favorable opinion of Congress (9% favorable and 85% unfavorable), but damn. The results weren’t pretty.

Here’s the outcome of PPP’s survey, in a handy illustrated form, from most to least popular thing:

#1:

image vs. image

When presented with a choice between Congress or Brussels sprouts, respondents gave a higher favorable rating to Brussels sprouts (69%) versus Congress (23%). [more]

Be sure to check out Meg’s full list, which is freaking awesome.

8:14 // 1 year ago
December 12, 2012
14:35 // 1 year ago
December 10, 2012
15:30 // 1 year ago
November 20, 2012
Dean Chambers, the man behind UnskewedPolls, admitted following a tough election that he’d been wrong on his premise that polls systematically underrated GOP challenger Mitt Romney. A couple weeks of reflection, however, and Chambers is back in action. He claims the president is little more than Barack O’Fraudo, having won four states (Ohio, Virginia, Florida, and Pennsylvania) through malfeasance. As to whether he still finds Nate Silver too skinny and effeminate to be trusted on numerical matters, that’s an open question. source

Dean Chambers, the man behind UnskewedPolls, admitted following a tough election that he’d been wrong on his premise that polls systematically underrated GOP challenger Mitt Romney. A couple weeks of reflection, however, and Chambers is back in action. He claims the president is little more than Barack O’Fraudo, having won four states (Ohio, Virginia, Florida, and Pennsylvania) through malfeasance. As to whether he still finds Nate Silver too skinny and effeminate to be trusted on numerical matters, that’s an open question. source

19:02 // 1 year ago
November 13, 2012
I spoke about what I believed and I think that there was a period of time when the Romney campaign was falling apart, people were not optimistic, nobody thought there was a chance of victory and I felt that it was my duty at that point to go out and say what I said. And at the time that I said it, I believe I was right.
Fox News analyst Dick Morris • Speaking to Fox News host Sean Hannity last night, on the matter of his woefully optimistic pre-election prediction that Mitt Romney would defeat President Obama in a landslide, with 325 electoral votes. Of note, right there in his explanation, an overt admission that he felt obliged to promote the idea of a Romney landslide (which was profoundly statistically unlikely) out of a sense of “duty.” He’s essentially admitting he’s more activist than pollster, which is fine — so long as your job description accurately reflects that. Otherwise, as an analyst, you’re doing anything but. source
20:27 // 1 year ago
October 31, 2012

New polling data shows President Obama gaining ground in OH while slipping in FL and WV

  • Florida A new Quinnipiac University/NY Times/CBS News poll shows Mitt Romney has drastically cut into the the 53 - 44 lead enjoyed by President Obama in late September. Romney still trails among early voters though, sitting 6 points behind President Obama in a 50 - 44 race.
  • Ohio According to the same poll, President Obama leads Mitt Romney by 7 points, with current reports suggesting a 50 - 45 split, which he has maintained for more than a week now. Early voting in Ohio heavily leans towards the incumbent as well, with President Obama leading Mitt Romney 60 - 34. 
  • Virginia Mitt Romney has also managed to gain some ground in Virginia, where he trailed the President 51 - 46 as recently as October 11. The former governor of Massachusetts still trails President Obama 49 -47; however, the candidate is undoubtedly happy about shaving the five point spread. Early voters in Virginia also tend to back President Obama, where he currently holds a 57 - 38 lead. source
13:54 // 1 year ago