The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

February 15, 2014

Reed College students know a thing or two about creating snowballs—800-pound snowballs, in fact—that have an impact.

20:26 // 1 month ago
June 29, 2013

How the Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage rulings are affecting state politics

  • changing gears Politicians in a number of states, most notably Oregon, Ohio, Michigan and Pennsylvania, have started discussing repealing laws which bar same-sex marriage in the state, whether through laws or through amendments. (29 states have amendments similar to the one struck down in California.) In the case of Oregon, the state’s Democratic governor, John Kitzhaber, argues that the federal ruling underscores the urgency of the issue. “Oregon has not yet lived up to the ideal of equal rights for all,” he stated. A court decision in Michigan involving a same-sex couple adopting one another’s children could also play a factor in that state—that decision was on hold due to the Supreme Court decisions.
  • doubling down In the case of West Virginia and Indiana, however, Republicans in the states are considering strengthening state laws barring same-sex marriage through the usage of amendments. One advocate in Indiana, the American Family Association of Indiana’s Micah Clark, argues that the decision should be left up to voters. “The future of marriage matters,” he told the Associated Press. “And it belongs in the hands of Hoosier voters, not the courts, not Hollywood, and not the activists seeking to change it from what it is and always has been.” source
11:15 // 9 months ago
February 4, 2013

jimmydaly:

The story of inmates who saved the lives of 3 boys in a flooded creek.

"Just because we’re incarcerated doesn’t mean we’re bad people.” An incredible story.

11:49 // 1 year ago
January 1, 2013
Would you vote for a guy whose entire policy platform involved letting people directly vote on every bill that passed his desk? That’s what Oregon resident Daniel Hollingsworth, who is running for Senate in 2014, is hoping for. Good idea or bad? (via Hacker News)

Would you vote for a guy whose entire policy platform involved letting people directly vote on every bill that passed his desk? That’s what Oregon resident Daniel Hollingsworth, who is running for Senate in 2014, is hoping for. Good idea or bad? (via Hacker News)

17:28 // 1 year ago
November 1, 2012
A new study from the Instituto Mexicano Para La Competitividad A.C. (Mexican Institute for Competitiveness) reveals potentially devastating consequences for a number of Mexican drug cartels should marijuana be legalized in a handful of the United States. The Mexican think thank believes the legalization measures on the ballot in Colorado, Oregon, and Washington could cut combined cartel profits by as much as 22 to 30 percent, and could severely cripple the infamous Sinaloa Cartel that operates in Western Mexico. source

A new study from the Instituto Mexicano Para La Competitividad A.C. (Mexican Institute for Competitiveness) reveals potentially devastating consequences for a number of Mexican drug cartels should marijuana be legalized in a handful of the United States. The Mexican think thank believes the legalization measures on the ballot in Colorado, Oregon, and Washington could cut combined cartel profits by as much as 22 to 30 percent, and could severely cripple the infamous Sinaloa Cartel that operates in Western Mexico. source

17:55 // 1 year ago
August 14, 2012
I have not had a drink in years and the one time I do this I what happens. I will never drink again.
Portland, Ore. resident Justin Gilpatrick • Reacting on Facebook to an ordeal in which he got drunk, fell asleep in a dumpster (rather than driving home), was picked up in a dump truck and was compacted with the trash — twice. He lived to tell about it, obviously, only having suffered minor injuries, but a pal of his who chose to drive drunk instead of dumpster-diving got into a three-car crash, though he didn’t get any life-threatening injuries, either. Enjoy your sobriety, Mr. Gilpatrick.
10:58 // 1 year ago
June 15, 2012

Man in Oregon contracts the plague: How often does that happen?

A very rare occurrence, especially in the U.S.: An Oregon man in his 50s contracted the “Black Death” plague while trying to remove a dead rodent from a stray cat’s mouth. While somewhere between 1,000 and 3,000 instances of the plague— yes, the same plague that devastated a third of Europe’s population in the 14th century — only ten to fifteen instances happen in the U.S. each year (this being the fifth incidence of plague in Oregon since 1995). Instances of plague are so rare that vaccination against it is no longer sold in the States, although it does exist. The man was still in critical condition in a hospital in Bend, Oregon as of Friday, and is being treated with antibiotics. (EDIT: As ajoyner notes below, New Mexico has had a number of cases, strangely, in affluent areas.) source

Follow ShortFormBlog • Find us on Twitter & Facebook

16:11 // 1 year ago
April 13, 2012
inothernews:

The Simpsons creator Matt Groening breaks hearts in politely explaining that his animated family’s hometown is not, in fact, modeled after Springfield, Oregon.

Matt Groening knows how to make an Oregonian cry.

inothernews:

The Simpsons creator Matt Groening breaks hearts in politely explaining that his animated family’s hometown is not, in fact, modeled after Springfield, Oregon.

Matt Groening knows how to make an Oregonian cry.

8:35 // 2 years ago
February 5, 2012
They just got turned around. They sought some shelter in a hollowed-out tree and basically they stayed in the same place. But it was heavy vegetation where they were.
Curry County, Ore. Sheriff John Bishop • Discussing the disappearance and later recovery of a family of mushroom pickers who spent six days lost in an an Oregon forest. Considering their situation — lost in a forest in freezing temperatures for roughly six days — the three family members (husband and wife Belinda and Daniel Conne and son Michael) came out of the situation relatively unscathed, with the three suffering only minor injuries. It helped that they largely stayed in the same spot. While the trio could see the helicopters circling them overhead, they had no way of sending them a signal informing them of their presence, slowing things down. The trio were lucky — former CNet editor James Kim died under similar circumstances five years ago. source (viafollow)
11:01 // 2 years ago
December 8, 2011
More on the case of Crystal Cox: A good decision made poorly?
The “blogger-not-a-journalist” thing still sticks, but … In the past few days, there’s been a bit of an uproar on the decision by a federal judge to decide, in a defamation case, that investigative blogger Crystal Cox isn’t a journalist protected by shield laws. We were ticked, too. However, Forbes reporter Kashmir Hill disputes the way the story was first presented by Seattle Weekly, which broke the story: “The facts in the case are far more complicated, and after hearing them, most journalists will not want to include Cox in their camp.” Hill points out that it appeared Cox was attempting to engage in reputation damage, not journalism, including sending out the e-mail shown above, in which Cox reportedly offered reputation-protection services. And ultimately, Cox’s claims —the ones that hit court after she was forced to give up her source — didn’t hold up to scrutiny. The fact of the matter is, the shield law element of this shouldn’t have even come up in the case: Even without it the claims wouldn’t have held up, according to Kevin Padrick, who claims ruin at the hands of Cox’s many sites. source
Follow ShortFormBlog

The “blogger-not-a-journalist” thing still sticks, but … In the past few days, there’s been a bit of an uproar on the decision by a federal judge to decide, in a defamation case, that investigative blogger Crystal Cox isn’t a journalist protected by shield laws. We were ticked, too. However, Forbes reporter Kashmir Hill disputes the way the story was first presented by Seattle Weekly, which broke the story: “The facts in the case are far more complicated, and after hearing them, most journalists will not want to include Cox in their camp.” Hill points out that it appeared Cox was attempting to engage in reputation damage, not journalism, including sending out the e-mail shown above, in which Cox reportedly offered reputation-protection services. And ultimately, Cox’s claims —the ones that hit court after she was forced to give up her source — didn’t hold up to scrutiny. The fact of the matter is, the shield law element of this shouldn’t have even come up in the case: Even without it the claims wouldn’t have held up, according to Kevin Padrick, who claims ruin at the hands of Cox’s many sites. source

Follow ShortFormBlog

12:57 // 2 years ago