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July 1, 2013
For decades the United States of America has been one of the strongest defenders of the human right to seek asylum. Sadly, this right, laid out and voted for by the U.S. in Article 14 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, is now being rejected by the current government of my country. The Obama administration has now adopted the strategy of using citizenship as a weapon. Although I am convicted of nothing, it has unilaterally revoked my passport, leaving me a stateless person. Without any judicial order, the administration now seeks to stop me exercising a basic right. A right that belongs to everybody. The right to seek asylum.
Edward Snowden, calling out the Obama administration for trying to block his asylum. Oh, and he made his statement through Wikileaks.
19:05 // 1 year ago
June 29, 2013
breakingnews:

Obama meets with South African Pres. Zuma, Mandela’s family
NBC News: President Obama continued his tour of Africa Saturday with his second stop in South Africa where he met with ailing icon Nelson Mandela’s family and also held meetings with current South African President Jacob Zuma.
Obama honored Mandela during his meeting with Zuma, saying: “The struggle here against apartheid for freedom, Madiba’s moral courage, this country’s historic transition to a free and democratic nation has been a personal inspiration to me. It has been an inspiration to the world.”Obama will close his visit to South Africa by visiting historic prison Robben Island near Cape Town before traveling to Tanzania, his last stop on his tour to Africa.
Follow the latest on Obama’s trip at Breaking News. 
Photo: President Barack Obama participates in a bilateral meeting with South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma at the Union Buildings in Pretoria on Saturday. (Jason Reed/Reuters)

Obama ended up not meeting with Mandela directly—understandable, considering the rough shape Mandela is in. (Mandela was one mile away, at a nearby hospital.) It’s worth noting that while Obama was meeting with Zuma and the Mandela family, there were large protests building up outside of a university where Obama was set to hold a town hall meeting—with many critical of the U.S. president’s foreign policy.

breakingnews:

Obama meets with South African Pres. Zuma, Mandela’s family

NBC News: President Obama continued his tour of Africa Saturday with his second stop in South Africa where he met with ailing icon Nelson Mandela’s family and also held meetings with current South African President Jacob Zuma.

Obama honored Mandela during his meeting with Zuma, saying: “The struggle here against apartheid for freedom, Madiba’s moral courage, this country’s historic transition to a free and democratic nation has been a personal inspiration to me. It has been an inspiration to the world.”

Obama will close his visit to South Africa by visiting historic prison Robben Island near Cape Town before traveling to Tanzania, his last stop on his tour to Africa.

Follow the latest on Obama’s trip at Breaking News

Photo: President Barack Obama participates in a bilateral meeting with South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma at the Union Buildings in Pretoria on Saturday. (Jason Reed/Reuters)

Obama ended up not meeting with Mandela directly—understandable, considering the rough shape Mandela is in. (Mandela was one mile away, at a nearby hospital.) It’s worth noting that while Obama was meeting with Zuma and the Mandela family, there were large protests building up outside of a university where Obama was set to hold a town hall meeting—with many critical of the U.S. president’s foreign policy.

10:48 // 1 year ago
June 23, 2013

A press secretary is a professional question-dodger, right? Well, if that’s the case, check out how good Jay Carney is at his job using this Yahoo News interactive graphic. (via Slate)

16:46 // 1 year ago
June 11, 2013
0:02 // 1 year ago
June 8, 2013
I welcome this debate and I think it’s healthy for our Democracy. I think it’s a sign of maturity because probably five years ago, six years ago, we might not have been having this debate. I think it’s interesting that there are some folks on the left, but also some folks on the right who are now worried about it who weren’t very worried about it when it was a Republican president.

President Obama addresses the NSA uproar. (via mediaite)

Of course, despite yesterday’s warming rhetoric, the NSA’s widespread data collection was a highly and tightly kept state secret, which rather undermines the idea that this is a debate the White House welcomes. 

(via mediaite)

14:36 // 1 year ago
June 6, 2013
Here we are talking about the post-Obama world, and where the Obama coalition is going to go. We think that Cory [Booker] is one of the people who is best positioned to advance that movement.
Steve Phillips, founder of Pac Plus, a progressive SF-based super PAC. There is a recognition amongst Democratic and progressive operatives that the Obama coalition won’t necessarily make it to the polls for every future Democratic candidate, and that if the left wants continue to utilize that coalition, it will have to be intentional and thoughtful with regard to which progressives it supports. Pac Plus is going to pour between $1 and $2 million to help elect Booker to the recently-vacated senate seat in New Jersey, which will be filled via a special election this October.  source
18:26 // 1 year ago
May 24, 2013
Basically, Republicans are attacking Obama where he is least vulnerable and at a time when they have minimal credibility. It isn’t working. By trying to turn everything into a scandal rather than saying Obama’s policies are wrongheaded—and rather than fixing their own image problems with minority, female, younger, and moderate voters—Republicans are focusing on attacking a guy whose name will never again appear on a ballot.
Polling guru and political analyst Charlie Cook, explaining why Republicans’ attacks on President Obama may ultimately fall flat. Despite the media feeding frenzy over the three concurrent scandals to hit the Obama White House, the President’s approval rating has hardly suffered at all: In general, it’s hovered around 51%, with one poll even showing an uptick since April. Meanwhile, a recent CNN poll showed the Republican Party with the highest negative ratings—59%—that either party has received in more than 20 years. “Americans may not be ecstatic about President Obama and his policies,” Cook writes, “but compared with the Republicans, they think Obama doesn’t look so bad.” source
17:30 // 1 year ago
May 23, 2013
President Obama just delivered a near hour-long speech on drone strikes and counterterrorism policy. There was a lot there; he announced, among other things, new steps the administration is taking to close Guantanamo Bay, changes in policies regarding drone strikes, and a more lenient policy for the transfer of Guantanamo detainees. He defended the strike that killed Anwar al-Awlaki and the practice of drone strikes in general, but also acknowledged their limitations. You can read the full text of the speech here (Photo credit: AP) source

President Obama just delivered a near hour-long speech on drone strikes and counterterrorism policy. There was a lot there; he announced, among other things, new steps the administration is taking to close Guantanamo Bay, changes in policies regarding drone strikes, and a more lenient policy for the transfer of Guantanamo detainees. He defended the strike that killed Anwar al-Awlaki and the practice of drone strikes in general, but also acknowledged their limitations. You can read the full text of the speech here (Photo credit: AP) source

15:35 // 1 year ago
May 16, 2013
22:30 // 1 year ago
nedhepburn:

Can we make ‘Go Bulworth’ a thing, you guys? #GoBulworth on Twitter and everything? 

Obama would make a really good Bulworth.

nedhepburn:

Can we make ‘Go Bulworth’ a thing, you guys? #GoBulworth on Twitter and everything? 

Obama would make a really good Bulworth.

11:10 // 1 year ago