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May 25, 2013

The Washington Post's Leonard Downie Jr. says the Obama administration's war on leaks is the worst he's seen since Nixon. 

In another, investigators seized the phone records of Fox News reporter James Rosen, searched his personal e-mails, tracked his visits to the State Department and traced the timing of his phone conversations with Stephen Jin-Woo Kim, a State Department security adviser. Kim was charged in 2010 as the suspected source of a Fox News report about North Korean nuclear weapon testing. Perhaps most disturbing, documents related to the secret search warrant for Rosen’s phone and e-mail records cited him as a co-conspirator in the espionage case.

This appeared to journalists to put Rosen in unprecedented jeopardy for doing his job. Although the president said in his speech Thursday that “journalists should not be at legal risk for doing their jobs,” he was nevertheless adamant about pursuing government officials who he said “break the law,” presumably by discussing national security matters and other classified information with reporters, even if that scares off officials from becoming whistle-blowers or even having any contact with reporters.

Downie, who is the paper’s vice president at-large and also spent nearly two decades as the paper’s executive editor, also says that the administration “has disregarded the First Amendment and intimidated a growing number of government sources of information — most of which would not be classified — that is vital for journalists to hold leaders accountable.”

13:20 // 1 year ago
May 17, 2013
A couple ticks behind on this, but Newsweek’s redesign is really, really good.

A couple ticks behind on this, but Newsweek’s redesign is really, really good.

12:50 // 1 year ago
May 16, 2013

The Legend of Ron Burgundy came to life this week when Australia TODAY host Karl Stefanovic channeled his inner-Veronica Corningstone with a last-minute change to the teleprompter lines of guest-host Roz Kelly. We don’t know about you guys, but we’d probably do this to our coworkers every single day if we worked on a televised news broadcast of any kind. Then again, that might be why we don’t work on a televised news broadcast of any kind. (ht to Gawker) source

16:52 // 1 year ago
May 7, 2013
Breaking news in the ongoing saga of the 25-year-old man accused of killing 12 and injuring 58 during a midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises on July 20.

Breaking news in the ongoing saga of the 25-year-old man accused of killing 12 and injuring 58 during a midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises on July 20.

(Source: twitter.com)

17:21 // 1 year ago
April 19, 2013
We get stories much faster than we can make sense of them, informed by cellphone pictures and eyewitnesses found on social networks and dubious official sources like police scanner streams. Real life moves much slower than these technologies. There’s a gap between facts and comprehension, between finding some pictures online and making sense of how they fit into a story. What ends up filling that gap is speculation. On both Twitter and cable, people are mostly just collecting little factoids and thinking aloud about various possibilities. They’re just shooting the shit, and the excrement ends up flying everywhere and hitting innocent targets.

Farhad Manjoo, Slate. Breaking News Is Broken.

FJP: Two things here — Adopt a slow news diet or pay very close attention to how you follow breaking news. Else, as Farhad suggests, take a long walk.

(via futurejournalismproject)

Also worth reading.

(via poynterinstitute)

15:37 // 1 year ago
March 27, 2013
19:21 // 1 year ago
March 26, 2013
Bank Head Resigns: Antreas Artemis, former CEO of Cyprus’ largest bank, stepped down on Tuesday, citing government interference with the Bank of Cyprus as his primary cause of departure. Banks throughout Cyprus remain closed on Tuesday, following a government ordered 48-hour delay of the previously scheduled return to semi-normalcy. Officials in Cyprus are working to verify that recently adjusted systems will function smoothly when banking operations resume, amid fears of a bank run in the recently bailed-out nation. Many in Cyprus have vehemently opposed the bailout plan, which will see steep levies on those who have more than 100 thousand euros in the bank. (Photo via EuroNews)

Bank Head Resigns: Antreas Artemis, former CEO of Cyprus’ largest bank, stepped down on Tuesday, citing government interference with the Bank of Cyprus as his primary cause of departure. Banks throughout Cyprus remain closed on Tuesday, following a government ordered 48-hour delay of the previously scheduled return to semi-normalcy. Officials in Cyprus are working to verify that recently adjusted systems will function smoothly when banking operations resume, amid fears of a bank run in the recently bailed-out nation. Many in Cyprus have vehemently opposed the bailout plan, which will see steep levies on those who have more than 100 thousand euros in the bank. (Photo via EuroNews)

16:04 // 1 year ago
March 20, 2013
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March 19, 2013
16:19 // 1 year ago
13:30 // 1 year ago