The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

December 18, 2012
As it turns out, she was not a teacher. Nor does it appear that Nancy Lanza had been a substitute or a teacher’s aide at Sandy Hook Elementary School, as some reported. Other accounts said incorrectly that she had been killed at the school along with her students, rather than at home before her son’s rampage at the school.
The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi • From an article today detailing the mistaken narratives and misinformation that sprung forth in the early hours after the Sandy Hook shooting, and how those mistakes can persist. This is not the first time we’ve seen so much bad information swarm a tragic incident, or even a school shooting — reports of motive in the aftermath of the Columbine shooting have also since proven dubious (perhaps explained best by Columbine author Dave Cullen). source
21:11 // 1 year ago
December 13, 2012
jaredbkeller:

I think the Huffington Post is trolling the Internet

Huffpo Hates Hipsters.
15:38 // 1 year ago
December 12, 2012
hypervocal:

Surely this New York Post cover isn’t as unapologetically appalling as the NYC subway snuff film that graced the cover eight days ago, and this won’t get the same instinctual rebuke that cover did. But what’s up at the Post? When did they become Faces of Death? Go back to sex sells — this is ugly.
MORE HERE.

The New York Post: You hear about the deaths we were unable to stop, twelve hours after they happen. Seriously, WTF guys?

hypervocal:

Surely this New York Post cover isn’t as unapologetically appalling as the NYC subway snuff film that graced the cover eight days ago, and this won’t get the same instinctual rebuke that cover did. But what’s up at the Post? When did they become Faces of Death? Go back to sex sells — this is ugly.

MORE HERE.

The New York Post: You hear about the deaths we were unable to stop, twelve hours after they happen. Seriously, WTF guys?

9:04 // 1 year ago
December 7, 2012
8:58 // 1 year ago
November 30, 2012

futurejournalismproject:

Michael Jackson’s Thriller Turns 30

Billboard has an interesting history about the November 30, 1982 release of Thriller. In it, we learn of technology disruption (FM was replacing AM radio) and the audience fragmentation that occurred because of it.

We also learn about CBS Records’ concern over the album’s potential success:

Since the start of the [80s], black music had been increasingly banished from most white-targeted radio stations. This was partially due the virulent, reactionary anti-disco backlash that resulted in the implosion of that genre at the end of 1979. As the 80’s dawned, programmers increasingly stayed clear of rhythm-driven black music out of fear of being branded “disco,” even when the black music in question bore little resemblance to disco. This backlash was greatly magnified by the demise of AM mass appeal Top 40 radio at the hands of FM, which led to black artists being ghettoized on urban contemporary radio, while disappearing from pop radio, which focused on a more narrow white audience.

How dramatic was the decline of black music on the pop charts in that period? In 1979, nearly half of the songs on the weekly Billboard Hot 100 pop chart could also be found on the urban contemporary chart. By 1982, the amount of black music on the Hot 100 was down by almost 80%.

Also, and notably, MTV had just launched. But the music videos the station played were very white as it followed the playlists occurring on the FM charts. They too were very hesitant to give Jackson airtime.

[MTV executives at the time] concede that the channel initially assumed it would not play the video, as its thumping beat and urban production did not fit the channel’s “rock” image. They contend however that in mid-February, after seeing the clip—which was possibly the best that had ever come across their desks—they began to re-think things.

Good thing they did.

Billboard, Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’ at 30: How One Album Changed the World.

How a legendary album got its footing.

11:29 // 1 year ago
November 19, 2012
20:23 // 1 year ago
September 30, 2012
africaisdonesuffering:

Battabox
Launching early in January of this year, Battabox has quickly become a household name in Nigeria. Bringing a new and different approach to News and Entertainment, Battabox aims to give Nigerians a chance to have an input in how their news and stories are being shared. Their tagline is ‘Nigeria like you’ve never seen before’ and that is exactly what they show you. From important news features to silly everyday activities, Battabox covers it all; giving the viewers, as well as those involved, a different perspective on things going on in Nigeria. We had the opportunity of speaking with the founder, who happens to be the ex-CNN correspondent to West Africa, Christian Purefoy, who gave us insight to what Battabox is about.
Rise Africa: I see you studied International politics and International History in University, was there anything in particular that attracted you to Journalism?
Christian Purefoy: I got into Journalism because I enjoy writing. That was the main thing; studying international politics obviously helped. I enjoy it because for me, it’s a big part of what makes the world go round. I had an opportunity to go to Nigeria so I followed that through. Funnily enough I got into it because of the writing but I ended up in video and enjoyed that even more.
read the rest of the interview

This is really cool stuff. The site, if you’re curious, is over here.

africaisdonesuffering:

Battabox

Launching early in January of this year, Battabox has quickly become a household name in Nigeria. Bringing a new and different approach to News and Entertainment, Battabox aims to give Nigerians a chance to have an input in how their news and stories are being shared. Their tagline is ‘Nigeria like you’ve never seen before’ and that is exactly what they show you. From important news features to silly everyday activities, Battabox covers it all; giving the viewers, as well as those involved, a different perspective on things going on in Nigeria. We had the opportunity of speaking with the founder, who happens to be the ex-CNN correspondent to West Africa, Christian Purefoy, who gave us insight to what Battabox is about.

Rise Africa: I see you studied International politics and International History in University, was there anything in particular that attracted you to Journalism?

Christian Purefoy: I got into Journalism because I enjoy writing. That was the main thing; studying international politics obviously helped. I enjoy it because for me, it’s a big part of what makes the world go round. I had an opportunity to go to Nigeria so I followed that through. Funnily enough I got into it because of the writing but I ended up in video and enjoyed that even more.

read the rest of the interview

This is really cool stuff. The site, if you’re curious, is over here.

(via globalvoices)

15:46 // 2 years ago
September 28, 2012
An amusing consequence of state-controlled media: In countries with a closed press, satire, by definition, doesn’t exist, and so when satirical pieces leak over from other countries, they’re often interpreted as real news. In other words, Iranians have more of an excuse for mistaking The Onion for reality than these people do. source

An amusing consequence of state-controlled media: In countries with a closed press, satire, by definition, doesn’t exist, and so when satirical pieces leak over from other countries, they’re often interpreted as real news. In other words, Iranians have more of an excuse for mistaking The Onion for reality than these people do. source

20:23 // 2 years ago
September 22, 2012
It was like pulling teeth to get information yesterday…a lot of senators were frustrated. And you pick up major newspapers in the country and you find details not shared with you.
Senator Lindsey Graham • Voicing frustration within the Senate GOP caucus that the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal received more detailed briefing on the Libya attacks than did congress. Senator Bob Corker called it “the most useless, worthless briefing I have attended in a long time,” and John McCain accused the Obama administration of holding the Senate in “disdain.” The closed-door briefing in question presumably also included Senate Democrats, but none have made hay about it in the way Senate GOPers have.
11:52 // 2 years ago
September 20, 2012
thepoliticalnotebook:

13 Mexican journalist have disappeared since 2003: here’s a map of their disappearances. These folks, as Atlantic Cities notes, were most likely killed, but unlike a number of their colleagues, their bodies have never been found. The map was made by Articulo 19. They also made an infographic of instance of attacks on the media with firearms and explosives.
[Atlantic Cities]

Nothing sadder than knowing that hard-working journalists went missing on a hunt for the truth.

thepoliticalnotebook:

13 Mexican journalist have disappeared since 2003: here’s a map of their disappearances. These folks, as Atlantic Cities notes, were most likely killed, but unlike a number of their colleagues, their bodies have never been found. The map was made by Articulo 19. They also made an infographic of instance of attacks on the media with firearms and explosives.

[Atlantic Cities]

Nothing sadder than knowing that hard-working journalists went missing on a hunt for the truth.

11:03 // 2 years ago