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August 4, 2013
The government of hope and prudence will have moderation as a basis of its management for running the country. The government will fight corruption and discrimination.
Newly-elected Iranian President Hassan Rohani • Speaking during his oath of office on his plans for handling the post. Rohani is seen as much more moderate than his predecessor, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The country’s Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, gave Rohani his seal of approval. “I approve of the prudent approach,” Khamenei said. “We need to take action wisely and prudently.”
10:29 // 8 months ago
September 25, 2012
God willing, a new order will come together and we’ll do away with everything that distances us. Now even elementary school kids throughout the world have understood that the United States government is following an international policy of bullying. They command from behind the microphone. They command and impose their wills on how things should be done. I do believe the system of empires has reached the end of the road. The world can no longer see an emperor commanding it. Bullying must come to an end. Occupation must come to an end.
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad • Describing the United States as a “bully” in a recent interview with the Associated Press. Ahmadinejad was in New York for the UN General Assembly. His final term as Iranian president ends next year.
23:49 // 1 year ago
February 15, 2012

Iran says it’s making its own nuclear fuel, doesn’t care what you jerks think

  • cause In a dramatic speech Wednesday, a white-lab-coat-clad Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said that Iran had figured out a way to produce its own domestically-made nuclear fuel. If true, this would be a big deal on the diplomatic front.
  • reaction For this and other reasons, both the U.S. and Europe are considering slamming the country with some super-strong financial sanctions, which have already led Iran to cut off oil exports to six European nations. source

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10:20 // 2 years ago
January 10, 2012
Ahmadinejad, Chavez joke about having nuclear weapon: Could this photo and this headline juxtapose better? Probably not.

Ahmadinejad, Chavez joke about having nuclear weapon: Could this photo and this headline juxtapose better? Probably not.

10:59 // 2 years ago
September 22, 2011
16:36 // 2 years ago
September 17, 2011
Everything is in place to post bail (for Josh Fattal and Shane Bauer) and to have them released, except for the signature of a judge.
Masoud Shafii, the lawyer for the American hikers jailed in Iran • Revealing that the fate of the two men rested in the hands of a judge — the $500,000 bail for each is in place, it’s just a matter of getting the judge to make a critical last step. Then Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal would be able to go home. Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi hoped the judiciary would so so. ”We hope the judiciary will announce its decision in the near future … According to our information, the judiciary has the intention of reducing their sentences,” Salehi said. The judiciary, which is very conservative, recently contradicted the words of Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, claiming that the hikers would not get released right away. source (viafollow)
11:31 // 2 years ago
September 14, 2011
The two Americans are going to stay in prison for a bit longer. Reports of their imminent release are wrong.
An Iranian judiciary official • Basically contradicting what Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said about the fates of American hikers Josh Fattal and Shane Bauer, who have been held by Iran for two years for what effectively amounts to trespassing. Was Ahmadinejad simply making nice with Ann Curry? Or sounding nice for the United Nations? If so, that’s really lame. source (viafollow)
10:14 // 2 years ago
September 13, 2011
9:37 // 2 years ago
July 25, 2011

Iran to pull the plug on the Internet in two years’ time

  • 2 years until Iranians get their Internet revoked source

» Although only 11% of Iran’s citizens use the Internet, Iranian officials have nonetheless decided that within the next two years, all Internet access in the country will be restricted to a state-controlled intranet. Which is to say there will be no Internet access in Iran. (Note from editor: This story is a little old. So as not to be giving you completely outdated information, we’ll point out that officials plan to roll out tests of their “National Internet” starting next month.)

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23:33 // 2 years ago
May 6, 2011
15:06 // 2 years ago