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July 2, 2012

"IVF is now part of the mainstream": Test-tube babies become common

  • 5 million test tube babies born since the first one, way back in 1978 source

» About 350,000 born per year: A solution that’s given parents everywhere a second chance has gone far beyond just being a medical novelty. Now it’s a commonplace procedure, one that’s gone far beyond the birth of Louise Brown, the first test-tube baby (now a mother herself). But, in vitro fertilization experts warn, it’s not a cure-all for pregnancies late in life. ”The subtext is that if people delay childbirth they may view IVF as an insurance policy that they can access at any stage,” says Stuart Lavery of London’s Hammersmith Hospital. “Unfortunately the facts still suggest that IVF success rates in women as they get older are not fantastic.”

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21:13 // 2 years ago
May 21, 2012
Click the link to read the text of Astrue v. Capato, this morning’s Supreme Court decision that held that children conceived and born from in vitro fertilization after their father’s death are not allowed the right to survivor’s benefits from Social Security. Unanimous decision, with the opinion written by Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (minor edit)

Click the link to read the text of Astrue v. Capato, this morning’s Supreme Court decision that held that children conceived and born from in vitro fertilization after their father’s death are not allowed the right to survivor’s benefits from Social Security. Unanimous decision, with the opinion written by Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (minor edit)

11:20 // 2 years ago
October 4, 2010

Test tube victory: In vitro fertilization pioneer nabs Nobel Prize

  • 32 years the amount of time it’s been since the first successful in vitro fertilization (Louise Brown) was born
  • 4 million the number of couples (and kids) that have benefited from the procedure since then source

» Why Robert Edwards won the prize: It wasn’t just for his pioneering spirit, though that helped. It was for the way that he followed his technique through and was able to allay moral concerns. “In retrospect, it is amazing that Edwards not only was able to respond to the continued criticism of in vitro fertilization, but that he also remained so persistent and unperturbed in fulfilling his scientific vision,” wrote Nobel Prize committee member Christer Höög.

10:17 // 4 years ago