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March 28, 2014

Teenager does the responsible thing, Athens, Ga. edition

  • $31k the amount a Georgia teen had deposited into his account a couple of weeks ago. It was actually someone else’s money; it was deposited into his account in error.
  • $25k the amount that said Georgia teen managed to either spend or withdraw from his account in the 11 days before the oversight was caught. (He thought it was inheritance from a dead grandmother, or at least that’s what he said.) The bank wants the money back, and is threatening criminal charges. We say the bank has to pay—since it was their screw-up—and the teen gets to keep the money. source
9:18 // 3 months ago
February 12, 2014

Latest snowstorms leave hundreds of thousands without power

  • 200K+ people in the state of Georgia have lost power during the latest round of winter storms to batter the South during what has been (for many states) one of the coldest seasons on record. Similar, though smaller-scale, problems have also been reported in Alabama, Arkansas, Texas and a number of other southern states. Though Wednesday’s cold weather didn’t lead to the same gridlock and isolation as last month’s snowstorm, it does offer the latest example of the sorts of problems that even public notices can’t fix, and has already led President Obama to approve new federal relief funding for the state. source
15:14 // 5 months ago
February 10, 2014

Georgia is ready for the big snowstorm, this time

  • 45 the number of counties under a state of emergency in Georgia ahead of a snowstorm expected to hit the region soon. This is a big change from the prior snowstorm, when no state of emergency was called—and the state became a nationwide laughingstock. source
21:17 // 5 months ago
January 31, 2013
15:18 // 1 year ago
November 27, 2012
Everyone knows that Saxby meant he was happy to raise taxes. Now, under pressure back home, he is waffling. He covets his seat in Washington and is fearful of being primaries. Georgia has primary run-offs, whichs means he can be taken out. He cannot bring himself to say he wants to raise revenue through changing in the tax code that will cause taxes to go up, so he dances around. Behind the scenes, we all know he will work to structure a proposal that increases taxes on Americans, but he’ll cleverly make sure there are enough votes so he can vote against it.
CNN contributor and RedState.com editor Erick Erickson • Condemning his home-state senator, Saxby Chambliss of Georgia, in a lengthy missive posted today. The impetus for Erickson’s denunciation is clearly Chambliss’ public disparagement of the Americans for Tax Reform pledge, engineered by Grover Norquist, which he signed some twenty years ago. The bigger takeaway: on his radio show later in the day, Erickson said he’s been approached about running a primary challenge against Chambliss, and that he’s giving it some “prayerful consideration.” We’re all for people getting involved in politics, so we tip our hats to Erickson if he opts to jump in. Though, as could well be true for most bloggers and pundits, it wouldn’t be an easy road back to politics for the former Macon County councilman — his opposition research file practically writes itself. source
20:14 // 1 year ago
November 17, 2012
Shine on, moonshine: The town of Dawsonville, Georgia is now, to the best of anybody’s knowledge, the only place in America with a moonshine distillery operating out of City Hall. Dawson County was at one time a moonshine capitol, the illegal brews then being sent through nearby Georgia Highway 9, a route that would come to be known as “Thunder Road" for the roaring of bootleggers’ engines. City officials endorsed the new distillery, saying it preserves a way of life. source (Photo by TheDarkThing)

Shine on, moonshine: The town of Dawsonville, Georgia is now, to the best of anybody’s knowledge, the only place in America with a moonshine distillery operating out of City Hall. Dawson County was at one time a moonshine capitol, the illegal brews then being sent through nearby Georgia Highway 9, a route that would come to be known as “Thunder Road" for the roaring of bootleggers’ engines. City officials endorsed the new distillery, saying it preserves a way of life. source (Photo by TheDarkThing)

16:44 // 1 year ago
November 6, 2012
in light of the contentious nature of the upcoming election, and some of the rhetoric indicating possible civil unrest, I have decided to close the community gates 24/7.
Cottages of Woodstock, Ga. HOA president Bill Stanley • Saying in an e-mail to residents that they would lock the gates to the community out of fear of civil unrest. The community is made up of people 55 and over. Beyond this current situation, some have previously suggested civil unrest if Obama is elected again. These people are on crack.
9:42 // 1 year ago
July 8, 2012
The Voting Rights Act wasn’t designed to be enmeshed in partisan politics. And that’s what is happening now.
Nathaniel Persily, a professor at Columbia Law School • Discussing the sudden legal pressure the Voting Rights Act is facing in states like Texas. The act was introduced in the 1960s to protect African-American voters from disenfranchisement at the polls. But recent state laws have begun to test its legality. Earlier this year, the Obama administration blocked a Texas law that would require voters to show photo ID, saying it was “unfair to minority voters.” Texas says it wants to prevent voter fraud; Georgia and Indiana have passed similar measures. Now, the fight is starting to heat up — with a hearing on Monday in a federal district court on Texas’ law, a possible prelude to a Supreme Court decision. Is it a reflection of the political climate? “Actions and interpretations that previously would not have raised partisan eyebrows are now seen as outrages,” said Persily. source (viafollow)
15:49 // 2 years ago
June 14, 2012
The law is pretty clear you may not deny participation in a program like this – that is run by the state – based on the mission and the message of the organization. It’s a free speech issue.
ACLU of Georgia Executive Director Debbie Seagraves • In a statement, confirming that the local chapter of the ACLU was researching the facts behind the Ku Klux Klan’s recently denied attempt to adopt a highway in the northern part of the state. She went on to note that, based on comments made by authorities when the decision was announced, it seemed that “the decision makers of the state thought that this was OK: it’s viewpoint discrimination.” So, who is in the right on this one? source (viafollow)
16:03 // 2 years ago
June 13, 2012
The impact of erecting a sign naming an organization which has a long-rooted history of civil disturbance would cause a significant public concern. Impacts include safety of the traveling public, potential social unrest, driver distraction or interference with the flow of traffic.
Georgia Department of Transportation commissioner Keith Golden • In a letter to a Georgia DOT secretary citing why they chose not to allow a local KKK chapter to “adopt” a highway stretch in the northern part of the state. Oh, there were other reasons too — the area, with its 65mph speed limit, would’ve been an unsafe place to for KKK members to work. But here’s the kicker — the KKK chapter, which says they’re “not racists” and are doing this to “keep the mountains beautiful,” has said they plan to get legal help from the American Civil Liberties Union if their application was denied. Can you get more ironic?
11:04 // 2 years ago