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September 7, 2011
Deserted scenes of Tokyo without a single man around came across my mind. It really was a spine-chilling thought.
Former Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan • Offering a truly harrowing vision of a post-Fukushima future for Tokyo. The vision for the 20-million-strong city helped push Kan towards encouraging renewable energy during his final months as Prime Minister, when he was dealing with the march earthquake. We’re with him. That’s a scary thought and it’s understandable why he changed his track as a result. source (viafollow)
11:05 // 2 years ago
August 29, 2011
Meet Yoshihiko Noda, Japan’s likely new Prime Minister: Now here’s a guy that shouldn’t get too comfortable. Noda will likely be Japan’s sixth Prime Minister in five years, and the track record for keeping this job isn’t great. Plus, Fukushima’s still an issue. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Meet Yoshihiko Noda, Japan’s likely new Prime Minister: Now here’s a guy that shouldn’t get too comfortable. Noda will likely be Japan’s sixth Prime Minister in five years, and the track record for keeping this job isn’t great. Plus, Fukushima’s still an issue. source

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11:10 // 3 years ago
August 26, 2011

The earthquake sealed his political fate. A mere 14 months after he began, Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan has just ensured that Japan will see its sixth prime minister in five years — and he outlasted most of them. However, his weak leadership during the earthquake — which should’ve proved an opportunity for him prove how his work as a self-made man ensured he was the right man for the job, after years of weak choices. Instead, he turned out to be a weak leader, too. “Mr. Kan is the outsider-turned-prime minister, who should have provided leadership,” noted close friend and adviser Takayoshi Igarashi. “The move to escape from nuclear power should have been his great chance to shine.” Not so much. source

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13:23 // 3 years ago
August 22, 2011
We were told that if things proceed as planned, the prime minister will express his (resignation) intention on August 26 … We were told to prepare to succeed to the next cabinet.
Japanese Finance Minister Yoshihiko Noda • Revealing that Naoto Kan is likely about to resign as Prime Minister. Kan, despite serving during one of the worst tragedies in Japanese history and having only served a year and three months, is the longest-serving prime-minister of the past five.
22:13 // 3 years ago
August 2, 2011
Fukushima radiation: What deadly radiation “hot spots” look like
See the red spots? You know, the ones surrounded by blue and green? Those represent 10 sieverts per hour of radiation. That is extremely high and could lead to death within seconds. And at the Fukushima site, that’s what they’re apparently still dealing with … mind you, five months after the fact. “Radiation leakage at the plant may have been contained or slowed but it has not been sealed off completely,” noted Osaka University professor and nuclear engineering expert Kenji Sumita. ”The utility is likely to continue finding these spots of high radiation.” To put this in perspective, add three zeros to the number 10, to make it 10,000 millisieverts per hour (mSv). Then, take a look at this graphic. Yeah. Scary as hell, right? We’ll say. source
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See the red spots? You know, the ones surrounded by blue and green? Those represent 10 sieverts per hour of radiation. That is extremely high and could lead to death within seconds. And at the Fukushima site, that’s what they’re apparently still dealing with … mind you, five months after the fact. “Radiation leakage at the plant may have been contained or slowed but it has not been sealed off completely,” noted Osaka University professor and nuclear engineering expert Kenji Sumita. ”The utility is likely to continue finding these spots of high radiation.” To put this in perspective, add three zeros to the number 10, to make it 10,000 millisieverts per hour (mSv). Then, take a look at this graphic. Yeah. Scary as hell, right? We’ll say. source

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10:18 // 3 years ago
July 9, 2011
Japan quake on Google Maps: As you can see, it’s off the coast of Sendai and Fukushima, much like the March 11th earthquake. 

Japan quake on Google Maps: As you can see, it’s off the coast of Sendai and Fukushima, much like the March 11th earthquake. 

21:34 // 3 years ago
June 20, 2011
Dear headline: We’d like to introduce you to the concept of “obvious.” It’s an obvious concept. Pretty much, if someone can reasonably deduct something based on readily-available information, such as the fact that the conditions at Fukushima right after the tsunami were probably chaotic, it’s obvious. Anyway, we’d like to introduce you all to our latest masterpiece, “Man Writes Quip About Article, Posts it on Tumblr.” It’s a classic.

Dear headline: We’d like to introduce you to the concept of “obvious.” It’s an obvious concept. Pretty much, if someone can reasonably deduct something based on readily-available information, such as the fact that the conditions at Fukushima right after the tsunami were probably chaotic, it’s obvious. Anyway, we’d like to introduce you all to our latest masterpiece, “Man Writes Quip About Article, Posts it on Tumblr.” It’s a classic.

1:28 // 3 years ago
June 19, 2011

Fukushima: Complications mar plant cleanup process

We’re at a point where merely opening a door can cause a radiation leak of some kind. That’s what plant operators had to deal with today, as they opened the doors to Fukushima’s No. 2 plant to cool things off and let some air inside. They hope to install a cooling system to prevent an explosion in the plant. Meanwhile, they hope to restart the cleanup process quickly, which was recently stalled. To give you an idea of what they need to clean up, let’s put it this way: 110,000 tons of highly-radioactive water, enough to fill 40 Olympic-sized swimming pools which absolutely nobody should swim in. Officials fear that things could get really bad — think water overflowing all over the place — if they don’t act soon to deal with the water. source

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11:35 // 3 years ago
June 16, 2011
Fukushima: Worse than was initially reported?
Is Fukushima worse than we think? That’s what this story from Al Jazeera suggests. One example they offer up: When seawater gets poured on the still-hot reactors, it produces radioactive steam that’s blown everywhere — even as far as the west coast of the U.S. One former nuclear industry executive, Arnold Gundersen, even put it as such: “Fukushima is the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind.” Is he right? Worth a read. (Photo via Flickr user Jun Teramoto) source
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Is Fukushima worse than we think? That’s what this story from Al Jazeera suggests. One example they offer up: When seawater gets poured on the still-hot reactors, it produces radioactive steam that’s blown everywhere — even as far as the west coast of the U.S. One former nuclear industry executive, Arnold Gundersen, even put it as such: “Fukushima is the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind.” Is he right? Worth a read. (Photo via Flickr user Jun Teramoto) source

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13:29 // 3 years ago
June 6, 2011
No one knows what will happen to Tepco in the future. We don’t even know whether the company will remain a private company or will the government take it over.
Fujimaki Japan’s Takeshi Fujimaki • Explaining why Tepco’s stock went down significantly today — at one point as far as 28 percent — after a financial report that suggested the company was in very bad shape. Simply put, many investors don’t think Tepco is long for this world as a private company and will need significant help from Japan to survive. The company could face $7 billion in losses for the current fiscal year — already on top of $15 billion lost in the prior fiscal year, which ended in March. That’s before any compensation costs are taken into account, by the way. Investors are betting on bankruptcy and/or public-sector takeover. source (viafollow)
8:30 // 3 years ago