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April 5, 2013
Now that [North Korea] has demonstrated its technical and scientific achievements, we remind her of her duties to the countries which have been her great friends, and it would be unjust to forget that such a war would particularly affect more than 70% of the population of the planet. If a conflict of that nature should break out there, the government of Barack Obama in his second mandate would be buried in a deluge of images which would present him as the most sinister character in the history of the United States. The duty of avoiding war is also his and that of the people of the United States.
Fidel Castro, writing in Cuban state media to advise its ally North Korea against starting a war. source
19:01 // 1 year ago
18:09 // 1 year ago
April 3, 2013
SFB says: Not a bad insight. North Korea never explicitly stated that Austin was a target; this assumption was pieced together by Westerners, who analyzed several blurry photographs released by North Korean state media (photographs that, it should be noted, the DPRK released primarily for domestic propagandistic purposes). That being said, Rick Perry would still like you to keep in mind that Austin is a burgeoning hub for businesses in the US. —Seth @ SFB

SFB says: Not a bad insight. North Korea never explicitly stated that Austin was a target; this assumption was pieced together by Westerners, who analyzed several blurry photographs released by North Korean state media (photographs that, it should be noted, the DPRK released primarily for domestic propagandistic purposes). That being said, Rick Perry would still like you to keep in mind that Austin is a burgeoning hub for businesses in the US. —Seth @ SFB

18:30 // 1 year ago
I think the individuals in North Korea understand that Austin, Texas, is now a very important city in America, as do corporate CEOs and other people who are moving here in record numbers.
Texas Governor Rick Perry, explaining his theory on why Kim Jong-un  listed Austin, TX as a possible target for a nuclear strike. source
17:35 // 1 year ago
April 2, 2013
The bottom line is simply that what Kim Jong Un is choosing to do is provocative. It is dangerous, reckless. The United States will not accept the DPRK (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) as a nuclear state. …the United States will do what is necessary to defend ourselves and defend our allies, Korea and Japan. We are fully prepared and capable of doing so, and I think the DPRK understands that.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry • Speaking sternly on a North Korean declaration to reopen its primary nuclear reactor complex in Yongbyon. North Korean state media reported that the reactors, as well as a uranium enrichment facility, were shut down and disabled as part of a 2007 agreement with the United States, which the government now plans to “readjust and restart.” This is not the first indication of a renewed international belligerence on the part of North Korea and its hereditary leader, Kim Jong-un — they also declared last week that they were entering a “state of war” with neighboring South Korea. source
19:14 // 1 year ago
May 10, 2012
Kim Jong-un demands the best for North Korean theme park guests
No free rides: North Korean president Kim Jong-un issued a rare public condemnation today of—wait for it—a North Korean amusement park. According to a South Korean report, Lil’ Kim visited the Mangyongdae Funfair recently, and was none too pleased with its upkeep. He called a path in front of a Viking ride “pathetic” and, upon spotting errant weeds growing in between pavement blocks, bent down and plucked them out himself (with “an irritated look” on his face, no less). He also showed his philosophical side, citing a proverb (“The darkest place is under the candlestick”) to illustrate the park’s poor condition. Analysts suspect it’s an attempt to portray Kim as a strong leader who cares for the good of his people, and we are 100% positive that this will work. (Photo: AP) source
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No free rides: North Korean president Kim Jong-un issued a rare public condemnation today of—wait for it—a North Korean amusement park. According to a South Korean report, Lil’ Kim visited the Mangyongdae Funfair recently, and was none too pleased with its upkeep. He called a path in front of a Viking ride “pathetic” and, upon spotting errant weeds growing in between pavement blocks, bent down and plucked them out himself (with “an irritated look” on his face, no less). He also showed his philosophical side, citing a proverb (“The darkest place is under the candlestick”) to illustrate the park’s poor condition. Analysts suspect it’s an attempt to portray Kim as a strong leader who cares for the good of his people, and we are 100% positive that this will work. (Photo: AP) source

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19:10 // 1 year ago
April 10, 2012
Is North Korea lying about its upcoming rocket launch?
An amateur satellite-watcher has accused North Korea of lying about its plans for an upcoming satellite launch. Ted Molczan crunched the numbers on the rocket’s planned flight path, according to a notice given to regional shipping and airline companies, and found they did not match up with claims from the DPRK’s government. Apparently he’s not the only one who thinks that things might not be what they seem. In an email to Wired, Air Force Space Command officer Brian Weeden expressed his own doubts about the honesty of the official story. “This is a country that has never successfully placed a satellite into orbit and doesn’t have a satellite industry,” said Weeden. “To try and put a fairly advanced satellite — remote sensing and weather, using UHF radio and X-band satellite communications — into a fairly precise orbit is quite the undertaking.” (photo by David Guttenfelder/AP)  source
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An amateur satellite-watcher has accused North Korea of lying about its plans for an upcoming satellite launch. Ted Molczan crunched the numbers on the rocket’s planned flight path, according to a notice given to regional shipping and airline companies, and found they did not match up with claims from the DPRK’s government. Apparently he’s not the only one who thinks that things might not be what they seem. In an email to Wired, Air Force Space Command officer Brian Weeden expressed his own doubts about the honesty of the official story. “This is a country that has never successfully placed a satellite into orbit and doesn’t have a satellite industry,” said Weeden. “To try and put a fairly advanced satellite — remote sensing and weather, using UHF radio and X-band satellite communications — into a fairly precise orbit is quite the undertaking.” (photo by David Guttenfelder/AP)  source

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20:21 // 2 years ago
December 19, 2011

And for the “unlucky” North Koreans: This is an interview with Dong Hyuk Shin, a 26-year-old North Korean who was born in—and escaped—one of the country’s concentration camps. In North Korea, if you’re accused of political dissent (which includes, for example, sitting on a picture of Kim Jong-Il), you and three generations of your family are thrown into a gulag. So if, like Shin, your mother is accused of opposing the regime, and she gets pregnant in the camp, you’ll be born there, and that’s where you’ll stay for your entire existence. Unless, like Shin, you manage to escape. This is a long video (Shin himself starts at about 21:00), but we guarantee your eyes will not be dry by the end. Oh, and here’s a New York Times article with more information on the DPRK’s prison camps, if you care to read more.

14:49 // 2 years ago