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February 14, 2011
To be honest, I always have that 5 percent of not being sure.
Susan Levy • Expressing doubts about the conviction of Ingmar Guandique – whether he was the dude who killed her daughter, Chandra Levy, a decade ago. This didn’t stop the elder Levy from calling Guandique ”lower than a cockroach” and a ”hideous creature” the other day, mind you. We understand Levy’s pain, and while we hope, for both their sakes, the right man was convicted, we can understand her doubts. This case has been a freaking mess ever since the name “Gary Condit” was tied to it all those years ago. source (viafollow)
10:23 // 3 years ago
February 11, 2011

Chandra Levy’s convicted killer sentenced, didn’t get life in prison

  • 60 years in prison for convicted killer Ingmar Guandique source
12:36 // 3 years ago
February 9, 2011
Did the TV guys win? How fast-flying TBD got its wings clipped
Above is a quick Compete.com chart comparing DC media outlets Wjla.com to TBD.com through December. See something notable here? Yeah, we do too. WJLA.com has slightly lower traffic than it did six months ago. But TBD has come out of nowhere to effectively triple the amount of traffic WJLA was getting. Which is pretty amazing, if you think about it – an effective rebranding greatly expanded Allbritton’s reach. (Both are effectively dwarfed by The Washington Post, but the Post has a national reach whereas the Allbritton-owned sites skew local.) And TBD’s editor Erik Wemple says January was the site’s best month ever. Despite this, though, WJLA effectively won the battle for media presence in Allbritton’s corporate structure. How did this happen?
HoW TBD BECAME TBD Allbritton, which also owns Politico, said it planned to launch a local news site last year. They brought on Jim Brady, a former Washington Post and AOL guy, who crafted a vision of a local news brand that worked across the board – in broadcast, on cable TV and online. It launched six months ago to much industry attention for its HuffPo-like approach to local news.
The visionary, out Unfortunately, corporate culture hurt the site right off the bat. Only a year after Brady started with Allbritton, he was out, a victim of a debate over aggregation (which TBD is really good at) vs. original reporting. “As we talked about the next phase of our growth, it seemed clear to Jim and I both that we had some stylistic differences,” wrote publisher Robert Allbritton. 
Did The TV Guys win? Now, just six months after TBD launched, it appears that the folks at WJLA control TBD’s destiny. The TBD TV component (on cable) is effectively going away. WJLA.com, the former site, is coming back alongside TBD. And WJLA’s general manager, Bill Lord, will be taking over as head of each of the local news entities. It appears the old-schoolers won. source
» Bloodletting on Twitter: Jim Brady, an active tweeter, has been ripping his old company over the last day or so over the decision to restructure. In his harshest tweet, he offered this sentiment: “At good companies, the people who resist necessary change are pushed aside. At bad companies, they are put in charge. RIP, the old TBD.” There is a degree of universal-ness to what he has to say, and many have been made their feelings known about the matter on Twitter today. While it’s certainly not the worst decision a company has made, TBD’s restructuring reflects a debate happening in newsrooms around the world: Is change needed? Or is the status quo more effective? Allbritton appears to have chosen the latter route, despite, you know, the chart above.
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Above is a quick Compete.com chart comparing DC media outlets Wjla.com to TBD.com through December. See something notable here? Yeah, we do too. WJLA.com has slightly lower traffic than it did six months ago. But TBD has come out of nowhere to effectively triple the amount of traffic WJLA was getting. Which is pretty amazing, if you think about it – an effective rebranding greatly expanded Allbritton’s reach. (Both are effectively dwarfed by The Washington Post, but the Post has a national reach whereas the Allbritton-owned sites skew local.) And TBD’s editor Erik Wemple says January was the site’s best month ever. Despite this, though, WJLA effectively won the battle for media presence in Allbritton’s corporate structure. How did this happen?

  • HoW TBD BECAME TBD Allbritton, which also owns Politico, said it planned to launch a local news site last year. They brought on Jim Brady, a former Washington Post and AOL guy, who crafted a vision of a local news brand that worked across the board – in broadcast, on cable TV and online. It launched six months ago to much industry attention for its HuffPo-like approach to local news.
  • The visionary, out Unfortunately, corporate culture hurt the site right off the bat. Only a year after Brady started with Allbritton, he was out, a victim of a debate over aggregation (which TBD is really good at) vs. original reporting. “As we talked about the next phase of our growth, it seemed clear to Jim and I both that we had some stylistic differences,” wrote publisher Robert Allbritton.
  • Did The TV Guys win? Now, just six months after TBD launched, it appears that the folks at WJLA control TBD’s destiny. The TBD TV component (on cable) is effectively going away. WJLA.com, the former site, is coming back alongside TBD. And WJLA’s general manager, Bill Lord, will be taking over as head of each of the local news entities. It appears the old-schoolers won. source

» Bloodletting on Twitter: Jim Brady, an active tweeter, has been ripping his old company over the last day or so over the decision to restructure. In his harshest tweet, he offered this sentiment: “At good companies, the people who resist necessary change are pushed aside. At bad companies, they are put in charge. RIP, the old TBD.” There is a degree of universal-ness to what he has to say, and many have been made their feelings known about the matter on Twitter today. While it’s certainly not the worst decision a company has made, TBD’s restructuring reflects a debate happening in newsrooms around the world: Is change needed? Or is the status quo more effective? Allbritton appears to have chosen the latter route, despite, you know, the chart above.

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21:14 // 3 years ago
February 3, 2011
After another losing season in which your recently acquired $78 million over-the-hill quarterback got benched and your corpulent $100 million defensive lineman simply refused to play, it is heartening to see you focusing your resources on trying to punish a newspaper. Yes, it may be a dreadfully arrogant and stupid thing to do. But the point is, you seem to want to do it. And believe me, what makes you happy makes me happy.
Washington Post columnist (and supergenius) Gene Weingarten • Writing about Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder’s decision to sue the Washington City Paper for publishing this article about him. The piece, a mostly-hilarious thing that suggests severe mismanagement of a beloved franchise, angered Snyder so much that he fought for the firing of the person who wrote the article about him. So… just to be clear, guys, Snyder just sued an alt-weekly for writing an article about him nobody outside of DC would’ve seen, or anyone inside of DC would have remembered, had he just taken it for what it was – an attempt to poke fun at an unpopular sports personality. Streisand effect, 1, Dan Snyder, 0.  source (viafollow)
22:11 // 3 years ago
January 27, 2011

By the way, New Yorkers, DC-area residents feel your pain, too

  • 422,000 without power (but not us) source

» We’re going to work today, but … many federal employees are going into work late, if at all in the wake of the wet, slushy mess which crimped our collective commutes home last night. We’d complain more, but we have power and were able to make it to Panera this morning.

10:32 // 3 years ago
January 17, 2011
The Washington Post agrees: The DC Metro makes free-jazz music
We’ve been saying for months that there is a great found-sounds album to be made from the incidental noises from the DC Metro’s escalators. Some of the escalators sound like they’re performing free-jazz. It appears the Washington Post agrees with us, because they wrote an article about it. Nobody steal our idea, OK guys? source
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We’ve been saying for months that there is a great found-sounds album to be made from the incidental noises from the DC Metro’s escalators. Some of the escalators sound like they’re performing free-jazz. It appears the Washington Post agrees with us, because they wrote an article about it. Nobody steal our idea, OK guys? source

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12:19 // 3 years ago
January 13, 2011

Road rage: Angry DC residents could rename Pennsylvania Ave.

  • cause Despite decades of fighting, D.C. is no closer to true representation in Congress than they were when 73-year-old delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton was born.
  • reaction City officials want to rename part of the city’s most famous street – Pennsylvania Ave. – to something really embarrassing. Too bad Congress has to approve it. source
20:26 // 3 years ago
January 7, 2011
Some jerk sending mail bombs in D.C., Maryland: The latest one, which never got to the intended recipient, Homeland Security secretary Janet Napolitano, exploded inside of a D.C. mail facility. Two others were sent yesterday in Maryland. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Some jerk sending mail bombs in D.C., Maryland: The latest one, which never got to the intended recipient, Homeland Security secretary Janet Napolitano, exploded inside of a D.C. mail facility. Two others were sent yesterday in Maryland. source

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20:31 // 3 years ago
January 1, 2011

DC’s “murder capital” status fades away, and then some

  • 131 number of homicides in DC in 2010, down nine percent from 2009 (from 141 killings)
  • seven of the last ten years have had fewer than 200 homicides; DC was once the U.S. “murder capital”
  • 1963 the last year the homicide total was so low in the nation’s capital source
19:31 // 3 years ago
November 13, 2010

This is how you get around gay-marriage laws. Mark Reed and Dante Walkup have long been in a committed relationship, and decided that they wanted to get married. Problem is, they live in Texas. So, here’s what they did: They had their ceremony in Dallas, but back in marriage-legal DC, they had marriage-equality activist Sheila Alexander-Reid officiate the wedding over Skype. (They got their marriage license ahead of time.) So they got married among friends, while still obeying local laws. Clever. Hopefully their union isn’t challenged. source

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11:53 // 3 years ago