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June 19, 2013
brooklynmutt:

“Aaaaaaaand we’re done here @CNN.” - @Brandon_Borders

Broken news

brooklynmutt:

“Aaaaaaaand we’re done here @CNN.” - @Brandon_Borders

Broken news

10:26 // 10 months ago
May 28, 2013
0:43 // 10 months ago
May 14, 2013
18:07 // 11 months ago
May 7, 2013
kindofagiant:

shortformblog:

brooklynmutt:

CNN’s Nancy Grace and Ashleigh Banfield Hold Split-Screen Interview in Same Parking Lot
Check out the “same bus in both shots.”
More: The Atlantic Wire

CNN’s problems, in animated GIF form.

OH MY GOD WHAT A HORRENDOUS OCCURRENCE! Seriously? People are complaining about their live shots? Well, considering Nancy Grace had to make multiple appearances on multiple networks right after one another, this actually makes sense. Ashleigh can host her show from one place while Nancy does all her appearances without making either crew scramble and run around town.
I get that picking on CNN is in fashion with the Internet blogs right now, but I guess I’d like to see more substantive critiques rather than “Hey they’re both in the same place! What’s up with that?!” Maybe there’s a reason why they’re doing it like this? Maybe give them the benefit of the doubt that they know what they’re doing? Sounds crazy, I know. Just my 2 cents.

Sure, let’s try a substantive critique.  The woman on the left is talking to Nancy Grace, a major CNN Networks personality who once berated a woman on television just a few days before that woman committed suicide, then was forced to settle for $200,000 in a wrongful death suit. When asked if she felt sorry for what happened, she said of Melinda Duckett in the immediate wake of the news, “If anything, I would suggest that guilt made her commit suicide.” Despite this, Nancy Grace is still on the air seven years later, talking in the same parking lot as Ashleigh Banfield. If you had a job where you did that and had to settle over it, would you still be working there? Probably not. But Nancy Grace is still at HLN.
The problem with CNN is that they have lowered their standards significantly, thinking that a broad but unbiased approach will bring the ratings. (It hasn’t.) Moments like Howard Kurtz’s 15-minute mea culpa are so rare on the network these days that you have to cherish them as signs that a network that’s lost its way might find it again. It’s like they realized recently, hey, Twitter is faster than we are, and so maybe this breaking news thing isn’t quite as fun anymore. Let’s do another “lighter side of life” segment.
They don’t have a rudder anymore. For the first twenty years of their existence, they had a pretty good one: Covering news, being the first news outlet to report on a story, keeping the level of the conversation high. But sometime between 9/11 and now, something changed. They got sloppy. They blew two major stories within a year—first healthcare, then the Boston marathon suspect. For some reason, Fox News scared them a lot. And instead of deciding their mission was hard-hitting journalism, they decided they were more comfortable with “background visuals for airport terminals.” Their rudder could be BBC, American version. But instead it’s, The Weather Channel, but for news.
You may think that this is a stupid thing to make fun of, funny ha ha, oh they’re on split screens like this. But really, the reason this is coming up is because CNN has become so much about the spectacle—holograms, giant touch screens, never-ending cruise line sagas—that you can’t take them seriously, and moments like this bus moving by two anchors at the same time overshadow the news actually happening.
I snarked that this was “CNN’s problems, in animated GIF form,” and I stand by it. They were already seen as lightweight, but then they hired the fluffmeister himself. They’re so concerned with looking like a serious news outlet that they’d rather look the part by having split screens than actually focus on the kind of in-depth stuff that Al Jazeera English actually does. Do you think AJE’s producers are like “we must get our reporter on a split screen to make it look like we’re on the scene”? No. They’re at the big kids’ table, reporting the news.
That’s why this GIF represents CNN’s problems. Because while they were busy putting Nancy Grace on a split screen, they could have gotten someone other than Nancy Grace to talk about this story.

kindofagiant:

shortformblog:

brooklynmutt:

CNN’s Nancy Grace and Ashleigh Banfield Hold Split-Screen Interview in Same Parking Lot

Check out the “same bus in both shots.”

More: The Atlantic Wire

CNN’s problems, in animated GIF form.

OH MY GOD WHAT A HORRENDOUS OCCURRENCE! Seriously? People are complaining about their live shots? Well, considering Nancy Grace had to make multiple appearances on multiple networks right after one another, this actually makes sense. Ashleigh can host her show from one place while Nancy does all her appearances without making either crew scramble and run around town.

I get that picking on CNN is in fashion with the Internet blogs right now, but I guess I’d like to see more substantive critiques rather than “Hey they’re both in the same place! What’s up with that?!” Maybe there’s a reason why they’re doing it like this? Maybe give them the benefit of the doubt that they know what they’re doing? Sounds crazy, I know. Just my 2 cents.

Sure, let’s try a substantive critique.  The woman on the left is talking to Nancy Grace, a major CNN Networks personality who once berated a woman on television just a few days before that woman committed suicide, then was forced to settle for $200,000 in a wrongful death suit. When asked if she felt sorry for what happened, she said of Melinda Duckett in the immediate wake of the news, “If anything, I would suggest that guilt made her commit suicide.” Despite this, Nancy Grace is still on the air seven years later, talking in the same parking lot as Ashleigh Banfield. If you had a job where you did that and had to settle over it, would you still be working there? Probably not. But Nancy Grace is still at HLN.

The problem with CNN is that they have lowered their standards significantly, thinking that a broad but unbiased approach will bring the ratings. (It hasn’t.) Moments like Howard Kurtz’s 15-minute mea culpa are so rare on the network these days that you have to cherish them as signs that a network that’s lost its way might find it again. It’s like they realized recently, hey, Twitter is faster than we are, and so maybe this breaking news thing isn’t quite as fun anymore. Let’s do another “lighter side of life” segment.

They don’t have a rudder anymore. For the first twenty years of their existence, they had a pretty good one: Covering news, being the first news outlet to report on a story, keeping the level of the conversation high. But sometime between 9/11 and now, something changed. They got sloppy. They blew two major stories within a year—first healthcare, then the Boston marathon suspect. For some reason, Fox News scared them a lot. And instead of deciding their mission was hard-hitting journalism, they decided they were more comfortable with “background visuals for airport terminals.” Their rudder could be BBC, American version. But instead it’s, The Weather Channel, but for news.

You may think that this is a stupid thing to make fun of, funny ha ha, oh they’re on split screens like this. But really, the reason this is coming up is because CNN has become so much about the spectacle—holograms, giant touch screens, never-ending cruise line sagas—that you can’t take them seriously, and moments like this bus moving by two anchors at the same time overshadow the news actually happening.

I snarked that this was “CNN’s problems, in animated GIF form,” and I stand by it. They were already seen as lightweight, but then they hired the fluffmeister himself. They’re so concerned with looking like a serious news outlet that they’d rather look the part by having split screens than actually focus on the kind of in-depth stuff that Al Jazeera English actually does. Do you think AJE’s producers are like “we must get our reporter on a split screen to make it look like we’re on the scene”? No. They’re at the big kids’ table, reporting the news.

That’s why this GIF represents CNN’s problems. Because while they were busy putting Nancy Grace on a split screen, they could have gotten someone other than Nancy Grace to talk about this story.

19:34 // 11 months ago
May 5, 2013
This is not a ritual for me where you just come on camera and say you’re sorry and hope to move on. I’m truly sorry about what happened. I believe deeply in good journalism and fair journalism and I am determined to learn from this episode and minimize the chances of anything like this happening again.
CNN “Reliable Sources” host Howard Kurtz • Apologizing, at extreme length, for his erroneous reporting about the Jason Collins story as well as his sloppy overall reporting in recent years. Kurtz, who left his job at The Daily Beast last week, said that his departure from the publication was amicable and mutual, and already in the works before the Collins situation broke. Kurtz, who also faced conflict-of-interest questions over his ties to a small-scale site called The Daily Download, spent a full fifteen minutes atoning for his journalistic sins this morning, according to Politico.
12:41 // 11 months ago
April 28, 2013
I admire their commitment to cover all sides of the story just in case one of them happens to be accurate.

That’s what Obama said about CNN at last night’s White House Correspondents Association dinner.

Let me explain why that is such a great line. CNN sees itself as “in the middle” between left and right, MSNBC and Fox. Just recently, in fact, CNN president Jeff Zucker praised the middle as the place to be. But CNN also sees itself as a great newsgathering organization that is all about truthtelling rather than ideology. “Keeping them honest,” as Anderson Cooper, face of the brand, likes to say. 

Put them together and what do you have? Keep ‘em honest, but stay in the middle. Which doesn’t work. For what happens when one side is BS-ing us more than the other? What happens when independent and honest reporting shows that these people on this side are mostly right in what they’re saying, and those people on that side are distorting the case?

CNN wants to believe, tries to believe and I think does believe that this problem does not exist. Therefore we have to remind them about it, because it does exist. And that’s what Obama did: “cover all sides of the story just in case one of them happens to be accurate” is saying to CNN: Accuracy and truthtelling will be sacrificed to your ideology— the middle, no matter what it takes.

(via jayrosen)

The sad part is, they had all these problems before they hired Jeff Zucker. And then they hired Jeff Zucker, a man whose entire recent career has been built on tone-deaf failures to understand his network’s audience, whatever that network might have been.

(via notemily)

13:58 // 11 months ago
March 27, 2013
Anderson Cooper, “Today” show host? Nope, he shot the offer down.

Anderson Cooper, “Today” show host? Nope, he shot the offer down.

12:05 // 1 year ago

politicsbuzz:

Total minutes devoted to yesterday’s Prop 8 coverage on cable news. 

Simple, effective, shareable.

(via thedorseyshawexperience)

10:36 // 1 year ago
March 23, 2013
I covered the Clinton administration for seven years. I don’t remember ever seen details of how much it costs to spend a night or two in Paris or London or any other place for that matter.
CNN anchor Wolf Blizter • Discussing his surprise at a recent report detailing the costs of Vice President Joe Biden’s recent trip to Europe. The price tag was hefty — in Paris, for example, he spent nearly $500,000 on a single-night hotel stay. According to the State Department, the costs are actually normal, largely because, for security reasons, the administration often has to book out full hotels for the vice president to stay in. While the costs struck Bush Administration officials as high, they said they understood why they might fly so sky-high. source
22:32 // 1 year ago
March 18, 2013

Study: Cable news heavily opinionated, but not the way you’d think

  • 55% of Fox News’ programming relies on opinion-based broadcasts, as opposed to factual reporting, according to the latest Pew Research State of the Media report.
  • 85% of MSNBC programming is opinionated, leaving CNN as the least-opinionated name in news with only 45%, according to the research and polling organization. source
14:23 // 1 year ago