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July 10, 2013
Want to keep Walmart out of your city? It seems passage of a so-called “living wage” law is pretty much all it takes to chase the 24-hour retailer out of town. Walmart officials have threatened to cancel plans to build several new stores in Washington D.C., should the city council pass a new law that would see the local minimum wage rise from $8.25 to $12.50. The vote passed an early vote last month 8 to 5, but proponents of the new legislation will need to convince at least one more council member to vote in favor of the bill to override an expected veto from Mayor Vincent Gray. (Photo via Walmart) source
Update: The bill has been approved, by the same 8-5 vote as before, though there’s been no response from Walmart or Mayor Vincent Gray at this time.

Want to keep Walmart out of your city? It seems passage of a so-called “living wage” law is pretty much all it takes to chase the 24-hour retailer out of town. Walmart officials have threatened to cancel plans to build several new stores in Washington D.C., should the city council pass a new law that would see the local minimum wage rise from $8.25 to $12.50. The vote passed an early vote last month 8 to 5, but proponents of the new legislation will need to convince at least one more council member to vote in favor of the bill to override an expected veto from Mayor Vincent Gray. (Photo via Walmart) source

Update: The bill has been approved, by the same 8-5 vote as before, though there’s been no response from Walmart or Mayor Vincent Gray at this time.

15:45 // 9 months ago
June 4, 2013
Artists often possess the skills and temperament that business leaders regularly say are in short supply: creativity, resiliency, flexibility, high tolerance for risk and ambiguity, as well as the courage to fail.

Why art school may be the new business school (via fastcompany)

Short supply indeed….

(via wingtipsandloafers)

Art majors, see yourself heading towards the business world?

(via wingtipsandloafers)

12:14 // 10 months ago
April 21, 2013
11:21 // 12 months ago
March 6, 2013

How Time Warner slowly but surely split into a bunch of little parts

  • Time-Life Not nearly as big as the other parts, but people recognize the name, right? The book and music marketing arm of the company, named after the two magazines which made Time Inc. famous, was spun off in 2003 and had to start running a disclaimer that said ”not affiliated with Time Warner Inc. or Time Inc.” Sounds about right.
  • Time Warner Cable The first big chunk to fall, the cable company was spun off partly because it was seen as having more potential to grow under a structure different from that of a pure content company. The split, which took place over a four year period, was finalized in March 2009. (Conversely, Comcast in recent years has taken the opposite approach, buying out NBC Universal from General Electric to become a top-down cable and entertainment empire.)
  • AOL The digital arm of Time Warner, which was once so massive that AOL bought Time Warner in 2000, ultimately became a drag on both companies after it became clear that there weren’t enough 70-year-olds to keep the legacy AOL service at a high level of profitability forever. In December 2009, the company, whose value had declined significantly in the period that Time Warner owned it, was spun off to its own space on the stock market. It eventually made a pure-content play, which has recently brought it success.
  • Time Inc. While the magazine industry came first, it would not remain the key part of Time’s empire, and after a failed merger of some of the magazines with the Better Homes and Gardens-owning magazine chain Meredith, Time Warner announced it was spinning off all of its magazines into a single company on Wednesday.
  • Time Warner So, here’s what’s now left—the cable channels (including HBO, TNT, TBS and CNN), the film studios (New Line Cinema, Warner Bros.), and the other entertainment arms. So, really, it’s just Warner and the remains of Ted Turner’s corporate empire. Synergy doesn’t last forever, right?
23:28 // 1 year ago
February 20, 2013
The New York Times Company purchased the Boston Globe for $1.1 billion back in 1993. It’s unknown why the Times is currently planning to offload the paper, which has been in circulation since 1872, though rumors that it would be sold have been circulating for some time now.

The New York Times Company purchased the Boston Globe for $1.1 billion back in 1993. It’s unknown why the Times is currently planning to offload the paper, which has been in circulation since 1872, though rumors that it would be sold have been circulating for some time now.

15:33 // 1 year ago
February 4, 2013

So apparently some Swedish guy’s video game did pretty well last year…

  • $232M in profits were generated by Minecraft last year, but Mojang’s founders aren’t looking to go public any time soon according to a new Reuters report. Apparently, despite Notch’s $100 million windfall, these guys want to keep doing what they love without having to answer to new bosses, a major publisher, or outside investors. You can officially consider us jealous.  source
18:41 // 1 year ago
December 19, 2012
16:55 // 1 year ago
December 7, 2012
breakingnews:

BREAKING: US economy adds 146,000 jobs in November
The U.S. economy added a solid 146,000 jobs in November and the unemployment rate fell to 7.7 percent, the lowest since December 2008. The government said Superstorm Sandy had only a minimal effect on the figures.AP reports:

Hiring remained steady during the storm and in the face of looming tax increases. But the government said employers added 49,000 fewer jobs in October and September than initially estimated. And the unemployment rate fell from 7.9 percent in October mostly because more people stopped looking for work and weren’t counted as unemployed.

Photo: A man walks past destroyed homes on the Rockaway Peninsula in the Queens borough of New York on Nov. 27, 2012. (Seth Wenig/AP Photo)

The good news: Things are improving. The better news: A tough month after Sandy didn’t crimp the improvement.

breakingnews:

BREAKING: US economy adds 146,000 jobs in November

The U.S. economy added a solid 146,000 jobs in November and the unemployment rate fell to 7.7 percent, the lowest since December 2008. The government said Superstorm Sandy had only a minimal effect on the figures.

AP reports:

Hiring remained steady during the storm and in the face of looming tax increases. But the government said employers added 49,000 fewer jobs in October and September than initially estimated. And the unemployment rate fell from 7.9 percent in October mostly because more people stopped looking for work and weren’t counted as unemployed.

Photo: A man walks past destroyed homes on the Rockaway Peninsula in the Queens borough of New York on Nov. 27, 2012. (Seth Wenig/AP Photo)

The good news: Things are improving. The better news: A tough month after Sandy didn’t crimp the improvement.

8:49 // 1 year ago
December 4, 2012
16:33 // 1 year ago
November 29, 2012

Likely brand sales won’t keep Hostess from screwing employees out of millions

  • $1.1M in monthly retiree benefits will not be paid by Hostess during the company’s liquidation process according to an attorney for the company.
  • $1.5M was collected by Hostess CEO Gregory Rayburn during fiscal 2012 — an average monthly salary of $125,000 — before bonuses or other incentives.
  • $1.8M has been set aside for the incentive bonuses of 19 Hostess executives, bonuses which the company argues are needed to retain the corporate officers and other high-level managers. Maybe it’s just us, but does this sound like, “Let us pay ourselves another $2 million, or we’ll quit too!” to anybody else?source
17:27 // 1 year ago