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February 23, 2011

Jury finds Shawna Forde guilty, sentences her to death

  • crime In 2009 Shawna Forde, the leader of Minutemen American Defense, committed a home invasion near the Arizona/Mexico border, hoping to find drugs to sell for the group’s finances. They ended up shooting and killing a Hispanic father and his daughter, aged 9, both U.S. citizens.
  • verdict A court sentenced Forde with the death penalty yesterday, finding her guilty of orchestrating the home invasion and subsequent killings of Raul and Brisenia Flores. The girl’s mother, who survived the shooting with injuries, said Brisenia was shot point-blank while begging for her life.
  • response Latino activists are upset by the lack of coverage this story received compared to the murder of Robert Krentz last year, which caused stridently anti-illegal immigration rhetoric and policy to flourish. Compared to the tepid response to this case? Yeah, it’s a starkly bad double standard. source

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14:54 // 3 years ago
January 23, 2011

There’s another infamous shooting of a nine-year-old girl that is making  headlines this week in Tucson. This time, we wonder if the rest of the  media will bother to cover it.
The little girl’s name was Brisenia Flores. She lived near the border  with her parents and sister outside the town of Arivaca, Arizona. On May  30 of 2009, a woman named Shawna Forde, who led an offshoot unit of Minutemen who ran armed border patrols for patriotic “fun”. Forde’s gang had decided to go “operational,”  which meant they concocted a scheme to raid drug smugglers and take  their money and drugs and use it to finance a border race war and “start a revolution against the government”.  They targeted the Flores home, which had neither money nor drugs, based  on dubious information. They convinced Flores to let them in by  claiming to be law-enforcement officers seeking fugitives, then shot him  point-blank in the head when he questioned them and wounded his wife,  Gina Gonzalez. And then, while she pleaded for her life, they shot  Brisenia in cold blood in the head. (Her sister, fortunately, was  sleeping over at a friend’s.)
(via CrooksandLiars)

This Daily Beast article is pretty informative, too. And the Wikipedia article is fairly detailed about what happened with a long reference list, suggesting it’s been heavily covered in the past, but never hit mainstream consciousness. A terrible, terrible story, no matter who or what was behind the chain of events.

There’s another infamous shooting of a nine-year-old girl that is making headlines this week in Tucson. This time, we wonder if the rest of the media will bother to cover it.

The little girl’s name was Brisenia Flores. She lived near the border with her parents and sister outside the town of Arivaca, Arizona. On May 30 of 2009, a woman named Shawna Forde, who led an offshoot unit of Minutemen who ran armed border patrols for patriotic “fun”. Forde’s gang had decided to go “operational,” which meant they concocted a scheme to raid drug smugglers and take their money and drugs and use it to finance a border race war and “start a revolution against the government”. They targeted the Flores home, which had neither money nor drugs, based on dubious information. They convinced Flores to let them in by claiming to be law-enforcement officers seeking fugitives, then shot him point-blank in the head when he questioned them and wounded his wife, Gina Gonzalez. And then, while she pleaded for her life, they shot Brisenia in cold blood in the head. (Her sister, fortunately, was sleeping over at a friend’s.)

(via CrooksandLiars)

This Daily Beast article is pretty informative, too. And the Wikipedia article is fairly detailed about what happened with a long reference list, suggesting it’s been heavily covered in the past, but never hit mainstream consciousness. A terrible, terrible story, no matter who or what was behind the chain of events.

(Source: onceuponanotsolongtimeago, via greenstate)

0:10 // 3 years ago